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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976
Page 11
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976 - Page 11. May 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 10, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2571/show/2565.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2571/show/2565

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976 - Page 11, May 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 10, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2571/show/2565.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_517k.jpg
Transcript Arts and Reviews Dan cers perform The Martha Graham Dance Company presented a fantastic performance on April 27, and won a well-deserved standing ovation from the Houston audience. The first dance presented was Seraphic Dialogue, which is the story of Joan of Arc, after her death, recalling various periods of her life as a maid, a warrior, and a martyr. The set, designed by Isamu Noguchi, included a prop used by the dancers which is at once a cross and a sword. Takako Asakawa, who danced the role of Joan after death, is an amazing performer. She is small and quick and agile. After the first intermission, Lamentation and Diversion of Angels were performed. Lamentation, "a dance of sorrows," is a very brief solo piece. The dancer, Peggy Lyman, is dressed in a mauve tube-like costume whose upper opening encloses her head and arms. She writhes and struggles with herself inside the costume, then finally sinks limply in defeat. It is a concise, beautiful, and convincing portrayal of sorrow. Diversion of Angels, "a lyric ballet," is an abstract expression of joy and love. Janet Eilber and Daniel Maloney are featured as the couple in white, with a colorful chorus of .women and men. Eilber is tall and elegant, and Takako Asakawa makes several appearances, dashing quickly across the stage in her red costume as an expression of gaiety and humor. Martha Graham has ingeniously cast and costumed the dancers in their best roles. These two dances, expressions of sorrow and of joy, were outstanding. I was disappointed with Appalachian Spring, Graham's collaboration with Aaron Copland. I found the Revivalist preacher with his entourage of groupies annoying, and the Hus - band seemed to be costumed for a cigarette commercial. The dance approached being a narrative, but the story was indiscernable. This last dance was a disappointing ending to an otherwise wonderful evening. ADELAIDE MOORMAN * The Society for the Performing Arts wilf brine the City Center Joffrey Ballet of NewYork to Jones Hall to present three programs.pf "All-American Choreography" June 14-16. The programs, to begin at 8:30 each night, are as follows: Monday, June 14: Face Dancers by Margo Sappington, Remembrances, by Robert Joffrey, and Trinity, by Gerald.Arpino. Tuesday, June 15: Kettentanz, Secret Places, and The Relativity of Icarus, three dances by Arpino, plus Duece Coupe II, by Twyla Tharp(vwith music by the Beach Boys); Wednesday, June 16: Viva Vivmldi and Drums, Dreams and Banjos by Arpino and Weewis by Margo Sappington. Rape film rapped MARGAUX HEMINGWAY As the maiden film to launch Margaux Hemingway's career » Lipstick may sink before leaving the dock. The film is a first in dealing with rape as a serious crime to be tried and punished. In other films, sexual violence is treated not as a crime, but as a matter of course in American life. Hollywood is capitalizing on the recent publicity of Inez Garcia and Joanne Little, rape victims who avenged their rapists. In Lipstick, instead of a Mexican-American woman, or a Black prisoner, the rape victim has been glamorized into a cosmetic model, and she is not motivated to shoot the rapist until he also violates her little sister. While the rape of the protagonist, the model played by Hemingway, is believable in terms of the defendant's insecurity and angry feelings of inferiority, the consequential rape of the model's younger sister is less convincing. That portion of the plot seemed to be a contrivance to provide Hemingway a motive to use her rifle, in the old family tradition. Both victim's responses were appropriate for the emotions that rape victims experience. The younger sister's hesitancy to take immediate action regarding her sister's rape realistically reflects the confusion, tear, and denial so commonly experienced with this crime. LINDA CRYER Administrator, Rape Treatment Detection Prevention Program City of Houston JANET EILBER Meg Christian sings May 13 Meg Christian is coming to town! Her album, I Know You Know, is the first to come out under the label of Olivia Records, the first national women's recording company. It has been enthusiastically received. As Amanda wrote in Pointblank Times: "She sings of women loving, leaving, and living with other women, of lovers, mothers and gym teachers, and of 'nightmares that mock our revolution.'" Meg Christian successfully combines her considerable music talents (she was a classical guitar teacher) with a strong commitment to music that speaks realistically to us as women about our lives~a combination all too rare. And best of all, she has a wonderful way with an audience. In a homecoming concert in Washington, D.C, her music carried the crowd with her wherever she ventured, from quiet musing to rollicking humor. She completely brought down the house talking about Miss Berger, the eighth-grade gym teacher she had a crush on. Meg and her manager, Ginny Berson, are driving from their home base in Los Angeles to visit San Antonio (May 7), Austin (May 8), Houston (May 13), Dallas (May 16), Albuquerque, and Denver. Houston's concert will be sponsored by Pointblank Times, a local monthly serving the lesbian-feminist community. The concert will be held Thursday, May 13, at 8 p.m. in the First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin. Tickets are a $3 donation and are available in advance from Pointblank Times staffers or from Abraxas, "Just" Marion MEG CHRISTIAN & Lynn's, Lamp Post, Odd's Place, University Boulevard Bookstore, or Ursula's. Or, to get your tickets by mail, send 25 cents plus $3 per ticket to PBT, P.O. Box 14643, Houston, TX 77021 no later than May 7. Child care will be provided at the concert. As a bonus, Meg will be conducting an informal workshop with Houston women the day before her concert here. She is eager to meet with active Houston women, and to discuss the politics of women's music or, knowing Meg, probably most anything. The workshop will be Wednesday, May 12, 7:30 p.m. at Abraxas, 1200 W. Alabama. POKEY ANDERSON