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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976
Page 7
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976 - Page 7. May 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 9, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2571/show/2561.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2571/show/2561

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976 - Page 7, May 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 9, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2571/show/2561.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
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File Name femin_201109_517g.jpg
Transcript Child care reforms advocated by Gertrude Barnstone and Rhonda Griffin-Boone Child care comes easy for the family on television's "Little House on the Prairie." Both mother and father supervise the children and are available when needed. Now, though, most people have to leave home to work. And, as one of the foremost advocates of child care put it, "You can't work and take care of your kids at the same time." Marie Oser, director of Child Care '76, first became involved in the issue of child care through her work in the Headstart Program and later through the Child Development Council of America. Child Care '76 was a concept launched in 1973, with the idea of focusing the Bicentennial on the needs of families with children. The group acts not as a direct service, but as consultants, working to help people reorder their priorities to include child care at the top of the list. "Our purpose is to help local communities understand and be more articulate in the area of family and child services," Oser said. "We assist in program development and help expand services already available." The basic issue of child care concerns the kinds of policies the U.S. should have toward family and children; Oser said. Most emphasis has been on day care and poor people, but the issue itself is much broader. "On one hand you have the proposed food stamp bill requiring mothers to work," Oser pointed out. "But where is the child care enabling them to go to work. Then you have apartments in more affluent neighborhoods which won't rent to families because unsupervised children are a problem. But why are they unsupervised? "Society says the family members should be responsible for themselves and surely one way to do that is to work," Oser went on. "But you can't work and take care of your kids at the same time." Oser feels there are ways to handle this problem, if we decide that "families are important and rearing children is critical." She says that people are upset over a "drop in reading or test scores," but their only response is "to add another program or a little more money." The important thing, she says, is to reaffirm the importance of the family unit and to establish a sense of community. "People don't really watch out for each other now," Oser said. "In this country, and especially in Texas, we have a hang-up on the philosophy of the 'self-made person'. We promote the idea that you're on your own. "But nobody does anything alone, really. It doesn't matter where you live. You've got to have support systems." Oser feels that society's mobility has prevented people from establishing such support systems, and she's not sure it's any better in states outside Texas. She feels the university setting is the "most operative" because people within the university have a "real sense of community " and while Texas goes a "long way on the individual thing, there are strangely, some communities that really hang together politically; communities where the decision makers form a tight circle, but where most people are not included." una BQQNE sS5 CYCLES I" 33 3; sn Come in to see Joy Boone and Sarah Pappas Citing examples set by other countries in regard to child care, Oser pointed out that in Israel and China, children are everyone's responsibility. If a child in one of these countries goes to the grocery store, the storekeeper feels responsible and helps the child. "Educationally their schools are what we consider backward and grotesque," Oser said. "But there is a caring for the child. On the other hand, in Russia as in America, children are very often ridiculed by teachers and adults!' Stressing the need of such responsibility for children, Oser said day care facilities were essential. "Many children have died in fires while their mothers were out working," she said. "People say you are responsible for taking care of your children; that it's no one else's responsibility. "I differ. I feel we do have a responsibility to each other," she said. "Certainly our defense policy speaks to that. We have decided since our country began that it's important to defend each other. People go to war and die to look out for other people, but what is more fundamental than future generations?" Child support is "iffy," Oser pointed out. The average woman's income is $3600 and women have the responsibility for the children, so "there you have it. Women and children are at the bottom of the heap." Child Care '76 wants people to make the connection between elected politicians and children, Oser said. While most people feel the government's role is to provide the money, Oser said the government should be the planners, the catalyst - not the actual provider of services. In Austin, for example, the city uses its own funds as part of the matching money for federally funded programs. But in Houston the city government doesn't put up anything. "If the city did provide money, we would be eligible for three times as much," Oser said. "We put up federal funds for day care match on a three-to-one basis." In not contributing funds for expanded day care facilities, Oser said that the City of Houston's reasoning is "they don't want to start something they can't finish. "It's true that some programs have started and dropped by the wayside," she said. "But if it's good and you've got a service people really need, then you stay. If it's not good, you pass on to something else. Let the law of supply and demand operate in this area also." Oser feels it's important for interested individuals and groups to let Child Care '76 know their concerns in the field of child care. "We've found that one of the real impediments to the whole thing is that people feel very alone," she said. "Again, we've got no sense of community. People think 'It's my problem if I can't take care of my kids.' Also, a lot of people who have these problems are not used to looking to government to solve any of them. We really have a pretty mixed up idea of what 'government' is. "It goes back to the consent of the governed," Oser said. "People who have not really participated in the system don't understand that the government is theirs and it should be responsive to them. "At lot of people don't want the government in any way involved in their family life and that's a choice, a life style. "But government," she said, "is only what we let it be." Pousson wins bike race Rachel Pousson, of San Antonio, pedaled off with first place in the April Fools Stage Race last month in Houston's Memorial Park. Representing the San Antonio Bicycle Racing Club, Pousson, astride a Colnago bike, punched in a sharp 39.58 for the fifteen mile ride. Runners-up in this senior women's class event included Reba Costlow, Dallas Bicycle Club, placing second; Jan Mc- Clure, Austin Bicycle Club, showing third; and Isabel Zsohar, also from the San Antonio Bicycle Racing Club, coming in fourth. Pousson's win in the Houston event is particularly commendable, as she suffers from chondromalacia, a softening and wearing down of the cartilage at the kneecap, coupled with a chronic dislocation of the kneecap. The disease, which is common with runners, has not hampered her effort toward championship racing. She manages to ride up to 250 miles a week every week. Pousson bicycles to her job as a life model for art students. She is a health food enthusiast, adhering to a diet of fruits, nuts and vegetables. She also believes in the beneficial effects of fasting. Pousson's goal is to race with men. "It irks me that the guys in my club seem to think that if I win women's races, I shouldn't want for any more," she said She also m admits to deriving a "delicious pleasure winning over men." MARY-K WILSON BARBARA GREGORY