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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976 - Page 5. May 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 9, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2571/show/2559.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2571/show/2559

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976 - Page 5, May 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 9, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2571/show/2559.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 5
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File Name femin_201109_517e.jpg
Transcript missionary. Since then she has raised a son, run a mission in San Antonio, worked as a nurse, taught nursery, kindergarten and Bible School, managed an orthopedic shoe store and founded the World Friendship House for international students in Austin. She came to Texas for a two- week vacation after college and she never left. "I traveled nearly 2000 miles alone from my Iowa hometown of 1200 people to Texas," she said. "I had never even seen a black or brown person before! "I have done all the things women want to be given a chance to do now. I support all the women's groups. I want them to have rights in the home, church community and business world," says Fridge, who sometimes attends NOW meetings and is a member of Women in Action (WIA) and a WIA senior citizens volunteer group called RSVP. She developed polio and was paralyzed for three years when she was in her late twenties with a young son. She was told she would be an invalid but "my work has always been with the public, relating to people" so she got up and has been active in public service ever since. "My family respected me for my abilities," explains Fridge, whose late husband studied to be a minister, and whose son is an assistant chaplain in California where he works with young adults and children. Fridge stands at the door of Rosary Hall, with the help of one metal crutch, to stress one more thing before I go. 'Anything to do with health, religion, communications or international people, I'm interested and ready to be involved." N MARSHA RECKNAGLE PAM SAKOWITZ AND ROBY Adopted mother CONNIE REID AND LAURIE Working mother Connie Reid is an incredibly busy woman with her job in advertising promotions and public relations on the Houston Chronicle Add to this her position on the Houston Advertisers Board of Directors and her interest in community activities, and you've got someone who's on the go most of the time. Reid loves it though. It gives her more time with her daughter. Laurie, 6, is practically a constant companion on her mother's ventures. "Laurie may be the only child in her class who at "Show and Tell" can tell that she voted for someone at a Houston Advertisers meeting," Reid said. A typical schedule for the two may entail Reid picking up her daughter from St. Luke's Day School, hamburgers for dinner on the freeway, and a meeting in which both mother and daughter cast their votes. "Laurie raises her hand and votes yes or no with the rest of us," she said. "People ask her what she thinks, and she tells them." Laurie plays an even more direct role in her mother's personal activities. If Reid considers taking on more time-consuming activities, she explains what it all means to Laurie and together, the two decide how to approach it. "When I go out of town or on dates, or just need some time to myself, I give Laurie a choice in who she'd like to say with," Reid explained. "I never force her. If there are choices, I want her to have them." Reid herself, however, might not have so many choices. One problem that arises with raising her daughter alone (she was divorced three years ago) is the adjustment she has to make when Laurie is ill or injured. Recently, for example, she was heavily involved in selling Grand Prix tickets through her work at the Chronicle. When Laurie got the flu, Reid set up an office in her home and sold tickets from there so she could be both nurse and salesperson. But when she can't be there, Reid said she was lucky to have friends and family in town who can stay in the house with Laurie. Reid likes her single parenthood. "With only one parent around, Laurie doesn't have to see any conflicts between two" she says. "There's only one way," she said. "Right or wrong, I can relate to Laurie on a one-to-one basis instead of a two-to-one, and it's a lot easier." She says her financial security has been a big help in allowing her the * easy-going relationship she has with Laurie. "I have ample child support and a good job," Reid said. "The only thing is, it drains my time. But it's okay because Laurie goes everywhere with me, and she doesn't mind the "busyness." "As she told me once, 'Mommy, the more jobs you work, the more money you make. And the more money you make, the more ponies I get to ride." RHONDA GRIFFIN-BOONE g "One day the telephone rings - g and you give birth." g That is how Pam Sakowtiz describes the "moment of birth" of her adopted son Roby, now two years old. "Actually, Bob (her husband) got the call, so I guess he gave birth before I did," she says, explaining that in the process of birth by adoption there is a more equal partnership between the husband and wife. "It's 50-50," Sakowitz said, "whereas in a natural birth, it's 100 percent, the woman. She does it — alone!" The adoption agency the Sakowitz' chose will not even take on parent clients unless a child can be "delivered" in a year's time. They try to keep the gestation period as natural as possible. "Both parents really get nervous around the eighth or ninth month, "PamSakowitz said. "Unlike a natural pregnancy you try not to think about it until you are called, and when the baby does come into your life, you are at your full-strength. No afterbirth problems or blues. It's just fun!" Sakowitz described her feelings upon seeing her new eight-day old son for the first time. "I thought he was the most incredibly beautiful baby I had ever seen. And, I was scared to death to touch him!" "It's absurd to think caring for a baby comes naturally," she said. "Natural instinct doesn't show you how to hold, how to burp, or how to prepare a formula. You need the help of a professional nurse for at least a week." During the waiting period, Sakowitz read many books on infant care. The best by far was "Right of Infants" written by Margaret Ribble in the '30s, she said. The book defines infant needs in order that parents may understand the trauma of the infant stage. "Old fogeys always say 'it's good for babies to cry.' Well, babies never cry for no reason," Sakowitz said. "Crying is a plea for help. If you ignore a plea for aid, then you are stifling their communicative ability. The cry and the pick-up are basic. "Even though I've used the books for guidelines I'm not the perfect mother," she says. What is a 'perfect mother?' "Some one that sublimates her needs and interests to the child," Sakowitz replied. "I wish I could do that. But I can't because of my conflicting schedules, need for privacy and private time." Roby has always had a live-in nurse, but Pam Sakowitz makes a strong point of saying "If I could not afford someone to share in the care of Roby I would still go out and get a job so that my salary would pay for his care. "Child care is absolutely essential for a mother," she says. "It's so deflating to a * woman's ego to have a husband be the sole link to the outside world." The Sakowitz' have a heavy travel schedule for their stores, but they've taken Roby to New York at least six times in two years. Never yet on European buying trips, though. "Roby's part of our life and our life style," Pam Sakowitz said. "When you adopt at an early age, you never think of your infant as 'adopted'. He's just yours.,, JANICE BLUE Grandmother MILDRED HAWKS j There is nothing about Mildred Hawks to indicate that she is a grandmother of 17 years, at least not in the traditional image conjured up by most of us. She does! not have a blue rinse on a conventionally teased hairdo. Seersucker shirtwaist dresses or polyester pantsuits are not part of her wardrobe. Instead, she allows her natural wavy brown hair to fall onto her shoulders and wears a blue workshirt and a comfortable pair of jeans, j The traditional image of grandchild-on-lap is also replaced by one of a porta-pack on her back, as Hawks goes out with her cameraman, Dale Brooks, to videotape interviews for her weekly Bellaire cable station program, '^Bellaire By- Line." By taking advantage of her art studies, Hawks landed her first job as a draftswoman during World War II. As she explains, "I know the only reason I became a draftswoman was because of the war. The oil companies would never have hired a draftswoman. But during the war, they didn't have any choice." This type of work has seen her through two marriages; six children and one grandchild who "calls me Granny to teas^ me. But I do not like to be categorized like that... I have other interests ... I need to get out arid do things." And she does. A resident of Bellaire since 1938, Hawks has been involved in community activities for over 20- years-ranging from the Bellaire Women's Civic Club ("My husband felt that was safe") to writing a weekly people and activities column, the "Bellaire Trolley Line" in the Bellaire Texan. Hawks refers to herself as a "history buff" but is actually a serious collector of rare books, having amassed some 2,000 books and memorabilia of Texas history alone since the age of 14. Upon joining the Bellaire Women's Civic Club, Hawks proposed their sponsoring a history of Bellaire, to be written by her, but "it died for lack of a second." Twenty years later, when the club decided to mimeograph copies of some of the residents' recipes, she found the opportunity to "slip in" her Bellaire history idea, which took nine months of research. "I remember that because it was like having a baby-and I've done- that so many times!" What was originally planned to be a capsule history beneath each recipe, filled the first half of a hardback publication entitled, History Cookbook." Plans for the future? "I would like to do a documentary on the Czech people in Texas," Hawks comments. "But there are seven major ethnic groups in Texas, so why just stop at the Czechs, why not go on?" BARBARA HUGETZ