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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976 - Page 2. May 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2571/show/2556.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976 - Page 2. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2571/show/2556

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976 - Page 2, May 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2571/show/2556.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_517b.jpg
Transcript Editorials Look at the record It's common for anti-feminists to view--and to perpetuate their view- - that all feminists are anti-homemakers. They charge that feminists devalue the work and worth of the homemaker and they mak traditional homemakers defend their work and worth where feminists have never questioned it. Listening to them during anti-ERA debates one would think that feminists rather than Madison Avenue admen created the image of "Mrs. Dummy: the housewife" who feeds her dog cereal rather than meat and who to this day has not found the right detergent to Wisk- away the "ring around her husband's collar"-caused by his dirty neck, incidentally. While anti-feminists have spent their time attacking feminists-the great majority of whom are full-time or part-time homemakers- feminists have been working on legislation of direct benefit to homemakers. For example: 1. Displaced homemaker legislation for women who have fulfilled a role as a homemaker and find themselves "displaced"-through divorce, widowhood or loss of family income. Feminists want to see the creation of multi-purpose service centers where job training and placement will match the special skills of former homemakers with the social needs of the community. 2. Guaranteed social security coverage for homemakers, including accounts in their own name that will not be affected by divorce or death of spouse. 3. Joint management of community property for spouse's <*n 4. Concern for the women victimized by household violence and provisions for sheltering them and their children plus changing the vvay law enforcement personnel deal with cases of household violence. 5. Child care deductions as well as a campaign for provision of facilities in the community and at places of work. 6. Safety of birth control methods and new understanding of our bodies during pregnancy and menopause. 7. Women-oriented rather than physician-oriented conditions of child birth. 8. The right to choose abortion as an alternative. 9. New credit laws that permit married women to establish their own credit history in their own names, which will preserve their credit standing through widowhood or divorce. 10. The concept of responsible divorce- Feminists have been unfairly blamed for the new no-fault divorce laws, though we did not press for them because we knew women did not have economic equality, especially after a lifetime as homemakers, but we have pushed for divorce settlements that provide for the support of the dependent spouse. This is only part of the feminist record of direct benefit to homemakers over the past ten years. Now, let us call for the record from the opposition. In the meantime, Happy Mother's or Homemaker's Day. We really appreciate and value your and our work and worth! HAPPY MOTHER'S DA Y from the mothers and daughters at Breakthrough Breakthrough STAFF Art - Charley Kubricht-Fore Advertising - Rita Highsmith, Nancy Landau Business - Jack Keller, Oiga Soliz Circulation - Leigh Hollyer, Leslie Larson, Lucy Moyer, Mary-k Wilson Copy--Gay Cosgriff, Barbara Hugetz Editors - Writers - Gertrude Barnstone, Janice Blue, Rhonda Griffin-Boone, Gay Cosgriff, Charley Kubricht-Fore Feature Writers-Jan Cunningham,Patti O'Kane, Wendy Haskell Me^er, Adelaide"Moorman Photography - Lily Barnstone, Marilyn Jones Production - Rhonda Griffin-Boone EDITORIAL BOARD Gertrude Barnstone, Janice Blue, Rhonda Griffin-Boone, Gay Cosgriff, Charley Kubricht-Fore Vol. 1, No. 5, May 1876 Breakthrough is published monthly by the Breakthrough Publishing Company, 1708 Rosewood Street, Houston, Texas 77004, P. 0. Box 8346, Houston, Tex. 77004. Telephone 526-6686. Subscriptions $5.00 a year. Newsstand 50 cents per copy. This publication is on file at the International Women's History Archive, 2325 Oak Street, Berkeley, Calif.. 94708. - l_ '* (Photo identifications on page 16) letters to the editor As a student of the now defunct UT System School of Nursing, I would like to express my appreciation for your article entitled "UT Regents Scalpel Nurses" (April 1976) I am extremely concerned with this decision. I feel that the precipitous action of the Board of Regents will directly affect the nursing care and nursing education offered in Texas. The UT System School of Nursing is devoted to preparing well- educated hospital bedside nurses, as well as nursing specialists with master's and doctoral preparation. Both UT regent Joseph Nelson, past president of the AMA's Political Action Caucus, and Dr. Charles Berry, President of the UT Health Science Center in Houston, have stated that they feel nurses are over-educated. How can a professional, responsible for human lives be over-educated? Even more important, how can nursing education be determined by people expressing such views? MS. PEGGY HANNIGAN Student Body President UT School of Nursing In am writing this letter to convey to your readers some of the reasons Texas nurses are concerned about the implications of such an action for the consumer of health care. Dr. Charles Berry, President of the UT Health Science Center at Houston, made the following statement on March 5, 1976 at a Search Committee Meeting for a Dean — "I do not believe in higher education for nurses. It only makes the health care delivery system more expensive and just takes money away from the professionals already in the system" (i.e. physicians). After reading this statement, you can begin to understand why the nursing and consumer community of Houston are worried about the future of undergraduate and graduate nursing education programs in Texas. However, I would like to add that not all physicians share Dr. Berry's attitude toward your need for quality nursing care. The whole issue centers on who will make decisions about the profession of nursing for you, the health care consumer. Will this administrator be a Nurse or a Non-Nurse? What will happen to quality nursing care if it is controlled by an antagonist of nursing education? I submit that you, the citizens of Texas, will lose- you will lose quality nursing care rendered to you in a compassionate manner to meet your individual needs. DR. EVELYN A. REDDING The rallying effort of nurses and concerned citizens throughout the state of Texas to form the Save Our School (SOS) Organization has been enormous. It confirms the assertion that the Regent's decision to dissolve the UT System School of Nursing was made without adequate input from those who will feel its effects. Money talks! The major movement of SOS is to raise the $300,000 which regents claim will be saved. The money will be offered so that the UT System School of Nursing's operations can be evaluated before it is dissolved... SOS desperately needs financial contributions. The citizens of Texas can protect the rights of our patients and future patients by mailing contributions to 7803 Lawnwood, Houston, Texas 77038. Call SOS Headquarters for further information: 621-7743. KATHLEEN STEVENS, RN Thank you very much for your article (April 1976) on our Planned Parenthood Center. The women of Harris County have shown us they want and need our services. In 1975, we served 18,000 patients for contraceptive services and supplies and approximately 31,000 patients for total services. The article you ran on the services available to the women of this county is of great service to the community. CAROL FLAHERTY Director of Education SHARON E. GARLAND Director of Resources