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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 31
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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 31. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 1, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/254.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 31. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/254

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 31, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 1, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/254.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 31
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File Name femin_201109_539be.jpg
Transcript I^ts.pajis&cleadpans The National Review, brainchild of ultra- conservative Bill Buckley, is probably not on the reading list of many feminists. Maybe it should be, if for no other reason than to illustrate the drivel that passes for journalism in some quarters. The story by James Kilpatrick (see photo) on the National Women's Conference begins, "The four-day hen session known as the National Women's Conference cost the taxpayers $5 million. It brought thirty thousand females to Houston, about equally divided between the libbers of Bella Abzug and-for their own unsubsidized meeting-the anti-libbers of Phyllis Schlafly. , . . This was the first such conference since the Women's Rights Convention. . . in 1848. That was 129 years ago, about the proper interval." And so on. A recent article, objectively titled "The Vixens of HEW," by Russell Kirk, concerns the women in HEW and other agencies who are working to eliminate sexism and racism in textbooks, "...these female zealots aspire to censorship of all school textbooks . . . this Monstrous Regiment of Women . . . dogmatic feminists . . this pack of vixens." There is no documentation of sexist content in textbooks, no challenge to the methods used to define sexism, only an emotional reaction. Another brilliantly-honed piece, "Ladies in Foxholes?" addresses the "awful consequences of the masculinization of the woman" now that women are being incorporated into fighting units. "And now, by all reports, they will be piloting fighter planes, jumping out of airplanes with explosives to mine bridges, and otherwise gamboling about the shores of Tripoli, no doubt led by the fierce cries of General Abzug. Really, the feminists have gone too far." It seems we still have a long way to go to rival the excesses of the National Review and its PANdits. (Thanks to Twiss Butler for this material.) "How much is your wife like the new Mrs. America? Compare when the new Mrs. America visits Good Morning America tomorrow . . ."—a recent promotion from the American Broadcasting Com- PANy. Just thought we'd warn you, so you can shape up accordingly. You know those chatty, mimeographed Christmas letters you get where the whole family is doing just great and everybody is leading exciting, productive lives? Well, you don't have to wait for Christmas. Mayor Jim McConn sends one out every week to the press, keeping us up to date with what's happening down at City Hall. Talking about his recent hospitalization, McConn says, "the work never really stops . . . the only time I really had off was the day immediately following surgery and even that didn't stop the phone calls which my wife, Margie, dutifully took and recorded for me." About two of his assistants, he says, "These two men were with my wife and I through the whole thing." More coy than LBJ about his operation, he thanked the press for not leaking the details of his surgery "which, while minor, was of a personal nature. The exact details of the operation remain private, but I will say that a certain radio personality was WRONG when he said 'Now we know why the Mayor no longer needs a women's advocate.' " No contest. Mayor McConn is the sole recipient of our bedPAN-of-the-month award. Baldwin-Lively centers in Houston have been advertizing a "super sale" on TV. A man and a woman are featured in the ad. The man gives a straight spiel on the sale. The woman continues, in an abysmal imitation of Saturday Night Live's Baba Wawa character, breathless and giggling. She ends by turning coyly to the man and lisping, "Hawold, have you got an organ?" This rotten organic matter is the creation of Yudell Communications, Inc. of Houston (formerly Media Graphics). PANissimo. OIL PAN Participating dealers will offer t-shirts and other items at reduced prices for proof of purchase of Amalie Dispos-Oil-Jug. Miriam Korshak, a PATicularly discerning individual, sent us two clippings, both from section one of the Houston Chronicle, April 5. (The two headlines read "Alleged rapist discovers woman swings mean iron" and "Schoolgirl wins city council race.") The "woman" in the headline defended her mother from an alleged rapist with a golf club. The "schoolgirl" won a seat on her city council (and intends to run for governor one day.) Both the "woman" and the "girl" are 18 years old. "It's interesting," says Miriam, "that the 18-year-old female who defended her mother against a rapist is described as a 'woman' and the 18-year-old female who won a political post and expresses the desire to pursue politics is described as a 'girl.' Can it be that women interested in politics aren't taken seriously? Can it be that you can't argue with a golf club? Just wondering." The U.S. Supreme Court last month ruled that judges are virtually immune from damage suits claiming that their judicial acts have wrongly harmed someone. Voting five to three, the court said an Indiana judge who approved a mother's request that her 15-year-old daughter be sterilized was not subject to damages. The young woman was sterilized, without her knowledge, at the same time her appendix was removed. Some years later, after her marriage, she discovered what had been done and sued the judge, her mother, her mother's lawyer and the doctors for damages. Justices White, Burger, Blackmun, Rehnquist and Stevens were the majority PANel. Dissenting were Justices Stewart, Marshall and Powell. Stewart, invoking a rarely-used privilege, read the minority's opinion from the bench. "A judge is not free, like a loose cannon," said Stewart, "to inflict indiscriminate damage whenever he announces that he is acting in his judicial capacity." The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has come up with a PATently faster, more efficient way of handling job discrimination claims. They hope it will put an end to a 130,000-case backlog and allow the commission to deal with a broader range of problems. EEOC chair Eleanor Holmes Norton said the new procedures for handling complaints of women, blacks and other minorities had been tested for five months in Chicago, Baltimore and Dallas and would be effective nationally by September. The procedure utilizes professional counselors, rather than clerks to take complaints. There are also face-to-face fact-finding conferences "instead of the usual paper- shuffling" and more emphasis on negotiating settlements. Norton said 1,545 cases were handled during the test and 73 percent of those cases were resolved with almost half resulting in negotiated settlements. Editor, Gabrielle Cosgriff The Texas Education Agency had an opening for "a full-time staff member to work in the area of eliminating sex bias and stereotyping in vocational education." The notice, sent to one of our readers, was dated March 27, was received by her on March 31st and the deadline for applications was 5 pm, April 7. That 5pm is important, when you get such short notice. Dash off a PAN to TEA, quick, before the deadline. Thelma Stovall, Lt. Governor of Kentucky, relinquished her chair March 17 rather than preside over the general assembly's vote to rescind the ERA. She challenged the "maze of dubious parliamentary procedures" that led to the vote, saying "My conscience and my conviction freezes my hand. I cannot sign this legislation which in my heart I know is wrong." On March 20, as acting Governor, she availed herself of the power of the office and vetoed the recission. Within hours, anti-ERA forces announced they would take her to court. Stovall admitted there would doubtless be repercussions from her action-she had not discussed it with Governor Carroll beforehand. Ratify a PAT to the courageous Stovall. For the most sexist, cliche-ridden show on television, the Ted Knight Show (7:30 pm Saturdays, CBS), takes the cake- make that PANcake. Knight runs a female escort service. The women call him "Daddy," he calls them his "girls." The women run the gamut of sexual stereotypes, from the dumb blond to the older woman pathetically trying to look young, to the timid basket-case afraid of a mouse. The premier episode had the "girls" working on Knight for a salary increase. One tried tears, one tried seduction, another . . . well, you get the idea. Don't send your dog out on a Knight like this. 30 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH APRIL 1978