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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 28
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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 28. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 1, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/251.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 28. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/251

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 28, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 1, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/251.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 28
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_539bb.jpg
Transcript Who deserves to win? (continued from page 3) ANTHONY HALL However, the Observer concluded that "He had gotten to the nitty gritty of the problem faced by many liberal legislators. He had made a choice between a progressive candidate (Farenthold) and practical politics (Briscoe)." Because Briscoe courts the support of the business community and the middle- class and has a dismal record on progressive issues, Hall's "Briscoe image" hurts him with liberals. "Sure. The black community has gotten only crumbs in return. But conservative crumbs are like liberal crumbs. Crumbs are crumbs." However, he did not vote for the conservative West Texan, Billy Clayton, for Speaker of the House as did some liberals, including Mickey Leland. Another black observer of the political scene agrees the "Briscoe image" is the most serious detraction about Hall, but he adds, "Sure. The black community has gotten only crumbs in return, [noting Briscoe's handful of black appointments to state agencies]. But conservative crumbs are like liberal crumbs. Crumbs are crumbs. "But," this same person says, "Anthony has the least negatives. He is keeping his nose clean and everyone loves his wife. He does everything right. He's the successful, straight American who joins all the right clubs. This makes you pure and clean." Hall's father-in-law is an active union member. He has been called "Hall's meal ticket into organized labor." (continued from page 3) MICKEY LELAND Leland's detractors say that he lacks effectiveness, that he has accomplished little as a state legislator. However, black women leaders with the National Women's Political Caucus in Washington are reported to be really interested in this political race and in Leland. They believe that he has shown the leadership ability vitally needed by the Congressional Black Caucus and that he could add some spark to the leadership on Capitol Hill. An article in the Texas Observer, July 2, 1976, reported that at the June Democratic State Convention, Leland was the choice of the Black Caucus for a seat on the Democratic National Committee. He was running against Hall, who was Briscoe's choice for the position. The Observer quotes Linda McGowan, a black from Austin, who explained the caucus' reasoning: "If we're gonna have a black on the DNC, we want one whose main interest is blacks. Barbara Jordan was too busy and Anthony Hall's main interest would be labor. So we voted for Mickey." He says his constituency has expressed the greatest interest in the issues of unemployment, housing, transportation, inner-city development, and education. He perceives these as the issues of the campaign, but he says other canditates are campaigning on personality differences. Leland has been criticized for treating women too familiarly, "He is terribly attracted to women. He puts his hands on them and they are really offended," say several feminists who worked in Austin during the last legislative session. In response Leland says, "I am the kind of person who touches, but I am suppressing this because I have become conscious that women perceive this as treating them as sex objects." A liberal State Representative from Houston said recently, "Mickey has grown up in the last two years and become much more serious about his work. And I trust his heart." (continued from page 3) JUDSON ROBINSON, JR. community-that of being the "most de-. spised among men." This story broke on the front pages of the Houston Chronicle. After only eight weeks on the city council, Robinson, in a few words, "negated the source of black concern for the past eight years," a March 4, 1972 For-, ward Times editorial charged. "It appears that Robinson was either insenitive, ignorant or easily misled." "Judson Robinson got elected because he wouldn't disturb the status quo." Robinson's campaign slogan is "Making Headway, Not Headlines." His critics suggest he makes no headlines because he does nothing newsworthy. One feminist characterizes him as lukewarm on women's issues and says, "He's not aggressive. It's my personal reaction he doesn't stand for anything. When pushed in a corner hell vote right." In November, 1976, a number of individuals and organizations brought suit against Mayor Fred Hofheinz and the city council members to implement single-member district elections and representation on city council. One of the witnesses for the plaintiffs was Moses LeRoy. He is president of the Citizen's Participation Committee of the Community Development Program. The court transcript of the suit records the following: M.L.: He (Robinson) got elected because Judson Robinson wouldn't disturb the status quo. Q.: . . . Isn't it true that in 1971 Mr. Judson Robinson ran at-large against an incumbent and defeated that incumbent? M.L.; Yes, he did, by 18 votes . . . Q.: In a city wide . . . M.L..... Judson Robinson did win. In all respect to Judson Robinson, I have nothing against him as an individual, but he won by about 18 votes. The rationale there was that, Judson, you go. We're not even going to count these votes. Mr. Welch told (incumbent) Curly Miller, "Go about your business. I'll take care of you. " They wanted Robinson on there because they knew Robinson wasn't going to rock the boat. (continued on page 29) THE ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN ATTORNEYS has endorsed JUDGE WELLS STEWART for the 308th District Court We as women attorneys have personal experience of his fairness and ability: Mary E. Bacon Zinetta Burney Joann Doughtie Bonnie Fitch Jo Ann Gerhardt Gladys Goffney Haroldeen Hartsfield Carolyn Hopson Juanita Keen Bettye Lambert Bernice Davis Leavitt Phoebe Lester Bette Pesikoff Iris Hefter Robinson Ann Morgan Zimmerer If you have any questions about his record of fairness and ability, call any one of us listed above. Political advertisement paid for by friends of Judge Wells Stewart. APRIL 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 27