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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 27
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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 27. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/250.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 27. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/250

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 27, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/250.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 27
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_539ba.jpg
Transcript (continued from page 25) been attacked by Archer. Eckhard received top ratings in 1977 from the League of Women Voters (94%), the League of Conservation Voters (92%) and the National Farmers Union (92%) among others. Lower says Eckhardt believes this indicates approval by the , oters and he will continue with similar legislation in the next Congress. Although Archer is spending $200,000 on his primary campaign, twice as much as Eckhardt has budgeted, Eckhardt staffers remember the $300,000 campaign effort in 1976 by Nick Gearhart, which netted only 40% of'the vote. A former television announcer, Gearhart, like Archer, opposes Eckhardt's liberal stance. "I feel a Congressman should represent-not just legislate, want to bring government back to the people," Gearhart says. He proposes to divide the huge L-shaped district into three sub-district offices: one in the north, one in the central and one in the southern portion of the district, and he intends to be in each office once a month. His opponent, Wynn Norris, an employee of ARCO Chemical Company, and an ex-Naval officer, calls himself "the people's candidate." "I believe I can best represent the district because I was born and raised here," says Norris. "I was here before the district's problems even existed, whereas my opponent lives in River Oaks." According to Norris, the country's two burning issues are the balance of payments deficit and inflation. He feels the problems can only be solved through increased oil production. He would also like to pass legislation limiting the terms of Congress and trimming the federal budget over the next three years. Gearhart would like to reduce the tax burden, end deficit spending and intro duce legislation that will enable individuals to choose private retirement over social security. Although both candidates feel they can beat Eckhardt, Norris says, "I have an edge over my opponent, because I know a lot of people in the district. In the end, the only way to beat Eckhardt is through personal contact." District 9 In the Democratic primary, Alan Verret is running against incumbent Congressman Jack Brooks in District 9, which includes Jefferson County (Beaumont, Port Arthur, etc.) all of Chambers and Galveston Counties and Northeast Houston. In the Republican primary Ed Falk will be facing Randy Evans. 'There is no response from Brooks on a personal basis," says opponent Alan Verret. "He makes no effort to meet people. I would keep in constant touch with my constituency through personal appearances and letters." Verret, an employee of Texaco and a newcomer to politics, is running against Congressman Jack Brooks, representative of the District for 25 years. He calls himself a conservative Democrat who would like to see government reform itself. "I want to restore honesty and integrity to the office and restore people's beliefs. If I ever use the office for personal gain, I will get out." Although Congressman Brooks did not respond to Breakthrough's questionnaire, his administrative assistant, Sharon Matta, confirmed that he had voted for the ERA. Verret, Evans and Falk, on the other hand are all against the ERA and the bill to extend the time limit for its ratification. "We have enough laws granting rights," says Verret and Evans. Falk adds, "I used to be in favor of the amendment, but you lost me when it started to talk about gay rights." Republican candidates Evans and Falk are in favor of revising the laws on rape, while Verret is opposed, though he feels it is time to change the law on homosexuality. Evans and Falk disagree with that stand and Falk adds, "I would not want them teaching my kids." While Verret supports federal control of quality child-care centers, Evans and Falk do not. Evans feels it is a "bureaucratic intervention" and Falk says " the government cannot solve every problem." "I am opposed to abortion, unless the life of the mother is in danger, but I would not vote it illegal," says Evans. "I do not, however, support federal funding of abortions." Verret would, because "I do not believe in legislating morals. If a woman wants abortion it is her right, and it should be available for rich and poor." Falk is totally opposed to abortion, adding, "if it's wrong for the rich, it's wrong for the poor." Falk adds that he does feel pregnancy is a temporary illness and should be treated as such. Verret does not. Both Republicans agree that women have been discriminated against in the areas of credit, housing, salary and job opportunity. Verret disagrees with that assumption. "The morals and opinions of women run this country. We can't reverse the roles, a woman is always going to be a woman. I feel the entire country is suffering from a family breakdown and this is one thing I would like to help change in Congress." All the candidates have women on their staff. Evans notes, "I am not in favor of a quota system, if you're qualified OK, if not,too bad." "I have practiced and preached equal opportunity for women for years," Falk says. He believes strongly that women are capable of doing any job. Evans feels heavy jobs are more suited to men, as does Verret though he says, "a person should be allowed to apply for anything they feel they can handle." Implementation of Title IX is opposed by Evans, but supported by Falk and Verret. Although Falk felt the National Women's Conference was well-conducted, "I just didn't agree with all the issues. You have let a minority group (lesbians) gain control of the movement. I just don't want my tax money spent that way." Falk terms himself a basically conservative, laissez-faire economist who believes in free trade and "America first." He was the economic adviser in the mid-60's to New York's conservative party and has written a book about his economic beliefs. "We must stop printing more money and balance the budget," he says. Evans, his opponent, also calls himself a conservative Republican who is concerned about the growing tax burden and inflation. He has been an employee of the Monsanto Company for 25 years and ran unsuccessfully for State Legislature in 1972. If elected Xo Congress, Verret would "like to limit terms of office;ease family tax burdens, protect the individual's rights by punishing criminals and stop the 10 percent inflation." Falk would "stop subsidies of the tobacco industry; vote for complete coverage of Congress by the networks and abolish all tax shelters and education incentives." Evans calls for "tax exemptions for elderly pensioners and an individual tax system in which a flat percentage is paid." What Mark White has done: While ASSISTANT ATTORNEY GENERAL for 3 years, Mark White recovered over 7 million dollars for Texas homeowners who had been defrauded. As SECRETARY OF STATE, Mark White didn't just talk about economy in government ... he practiced it by returning over 4 million dollars to the Texas Treasury. This money was appropriated by the legislature to run his office ... he could have spent it . . . but he didn't because he didn't need to. Mark White also cut through government red tape by installing a toll- free 24-hour telephone system in the Secretary of State's Office so you could get answers to questions about government. It was Mark White who made state agencies publish their new and proposed regulations so you would know what was happening in state government. MARK WHITE FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL Performance NOT Promises White established an extensive recruiting program in which listings of available jobs were sent to a large variety of groups and organizations. This resulted in a significant increase of Anglo, Black and Spanish sur- named females in the Office of Secretary of State. White employed: • the first woman director of the Enforcement Division • the first woman supervisor in the Enforcement Division • the first woman supervisor in the Extradition area • the first three women Administrative Assistants in the Executive Division • three, women lawyers in the Elections Division • the first woman deputy director of the Corporation Division • the first woman deputy director of the Uniform Commercial Code Division • the first woman deputy director of the Elections Division Daniel, as Speaker of the House of Representatives, hired no women, no black or Mexican-American men or women in decision-making positions in his office. Daniel failed to pass the State Civil Rights Act which would have guaranteed the protection of women's and racial minorities' rights. S.B. 558 by Brooks passed the Senate, was endorsed by the Governor and failed in the House...with Daniels in the all powerful Speakers Chair. What Mark White Will Do.. Mark White will establish a special division in the Attorney General's office to represent consumers on this and other issues. Mark White does not believe the states of Wyoming and Montana should get by with charging us a 30% excise tax on coal after we have already signed long term contracts with those states. As Attorney General, Mark White will go to court on your behalf to stop these practices that are causing Texans to pay the highest utility rates in the nation. Mark White opposes the new federal energy plan that would allow the federal government to control the price of natural gas sold within Texas and to force us to send natural gas to other states during "emergencies" at regulated prices. Mark White believes that our' first obligation is to protect Texas' natural resources for Texans. 26 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH APRIL 1978