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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 22
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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 22. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/245.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 22. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/245

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 22, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/245.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 22
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_539av.jpg
Transcript on the bench their own name; saying it would be bad for the child to have a name that is different from the mother's. They will take a woman's child if she is living with another man while waiting for her divorce, but ignore the fact that the husband is living with another woman during the same period. They hand down decisions that do not follow the letter of the law, and there is not a damn thing we can do about it." Judges have an unlimited amount of power. "Just an unlimited discretion, especially in family court," stated a 20-year veteran in family and tax law. "You just cannot afford to alienate a judge in these courts." A tradition of mid-term retirements allows the governor to appoint virtually all of our judges, and since less than 20% of us vote in judicial races, voter disinterest But another attorney asked "Why pick on the only Mexican-American judge we have? Sure he says a lot of patronizing things but so do others, and he makes better decisions." "We do have a few good judges," remarked an attorney who added, "unfortunately some of them are running against each other. I have great respect for and support Salazar, his decisions are equitable. He concentrates on the issues before him, spends time on them, listens. I also have great respect for Nell Hollo- x way and I would support her in any other district." Three of the incumbents in this election are women. Ruby Sondock and Joe Kegans are unopposed, but County Criminal Court Judge Alice Bonner has drawn six opponents. "She is young, black, female and newly appointed," said one at- "They are just up there playing God, moralizing...they hand down decisions that do not follow the letter of the law and there is not a damn thing we can do about it." practically guarantees a lifelong seat on the bench. "This responsibility for judicial appointments is what makes our choice of governor so important," emphasized one attorney. It also explains the absence of Republican judges. "How long has it been since we've had a Republican governor?" The overwhelming odds against winning make Republican and Democratic attorneys alike hard-pressed to raise the 75 to 100 thousand dollars it takes to run a countywide judicial race. And there is more at stake than the opportunity to be judge. The law practice that is an attorney's livelihood may suffer serious repercussions. "How would you like to go, with your client's life in your hands, before a judge whom you had tried to unseat in the previous election?" asked one attorney. The only woman among the judicial challengers is Nell Holloway, who is running in a Family District Court against recently appointed Felix Salazar. One of her supporters explained Holloway's fat torney, "they consider her an easy target." "Judges are closer to the electorate than any other elected official," another attorney pointed out. "Even if you never enter a courtroom, never are party to a divorce or a suit for damages in an accident, or a child custody hearing or a rape trial, your life is nevertheless affected in countless crucial ways by the decisions handed down by our judges." The legislature makes the law, but the judges interpret it/ "State judges determine the reasonableness of legislative classifications, decide whether a state regulation of business is arbitrary, rule whether the city council has exceeded its authority, decide whether the governor has the power to remove a local district attorney, all vital roles in determining who gets what, and when, where and how they get it." What makes a person want to be a judge, to sit in judgment of other people and have the responsibility for their lives and destinies? "Ego. It's an ego trip." an- "Courts are presumably run to expedite cases, but they are really run for the convenience of the judge." ure to win an endorsement by the Association of Women Attorneys. "There were just barely enough women there who had not been put down by Salazar." She went on to note that "the vote was split down the middle, so there were just as many women attorneys there who felt they wanted to risk not supporting Salazar in order to express their position against his attitude toward women." swered several attorneys flatly. One attorney added, "sometimes an attorney will want to run to knock out a bad judge, and I respect that, we need more of that; but generally, it's a real super ego trip. It's a hell of a job, why else would anyone want to be there? It's like why would anyone want to be President of the United States? Ego." See Court Structure, next page X Learn Self-Sufficiency In a Wilderness Environment Mountain, River, or Desert OUTBACK EXPEDITIONS P.O. Box 444 Austin, Texas 78767 (512) 442-8036 T The Texas Democratic Party Brings You "ACCESS TO GOVERNMENT DAY" After you vote in the Democratic Primary May 6 to choose candidates for office, you have another chance to influence government decisions. ATTEND YOUR PRECINCT CONVENTION AT 7:15 PM AT YOUR POLLING PLACE. Here's what will happen at your precinct convention: 1. Call to order. 2. Make list of qualified participants—anyone in the precinct who voted in the May 6 Democratic Primary. 3. Elect chair and secretary by majority vote. 4. Caucus or subdivide by support of issues or candidates. 5. Select delegates to Senatorial District Convention (May 13). Each caucus representing at least 15% of the participants elects its proportional share of delegates and alternates. 6. Delegation must reflect political and ethnic makeup of precinct. Only 2/3's of delegation can be of same sex. These delegates may go on to the State and National Conventions. 7. The Convention ratifies caucus selections, conducts any other business and adjourns. 8. Secretary files minutes of convention with County Clerk. Any Questions? Call 455-0381 or 522-0784 Paid for by Harris County State Democratic Executive Committee members. Leadership NOW for tomorrow's Harris County JUDGE Mike DRISCOLL —county judge— PROFESSIONAL • EXPERIENCED • QUALIFIED 9 years legal, business and county government experience* degrees in business administration, law • Harris Co. Justice of the Peace • Director, Clear Lake Chamber of Commerce, Co-Chair, Transportation Committee • Judicial Representative, Houston-Galveston Council on Law Enforcement • Director, Riverside General Hospital • Director, Bay Area Drug Abuse Committee • Harris Co. Precinct Judge, Democratic Executive Committee • Harris Co. District Attorney's Office, U.S. Senate Intern Programs DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY SATURDAY, MAY 6 Headquarters; 2917 San Jacinto, 522-5816 Paid by Judge Mike Driscoll ( ampaign, 2917 San Jacinto, Houston, Texas 77004, Red Adair, Chair, Charles L. Whynot, Treasurer APRIL 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 21