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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 18
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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 18. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/241.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 18. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/241

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 18, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/241.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 18
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File Name femin_201109_539ar.jpg
Transcript Twenty-five fathers who did all right- producing the 25 daughters who later became top management executives- were interviewed by Hennig and Jardim. Their case histories show that their fathers influenced them in their early years, and their (male) bosses helped them climb the success ladder later. In the women's own estimation, their mothers were simply passive creatures who allowed the fathers great freedom in the upbringing of their daughters. "Mother was mother as far as I can recall," one woman says. "As I think back, Father was really something special ...I was Daddy's special girl. There were always special times set aside for him and me to be alone. He was a very active man and I was always expected to be active with him." This feeling of being special had far- reaching effects in the later careers of the 25 women. As executives, they felt more comfortable as the queen bee in a group of men, and they found other women boring or silly. Because these 25 were considered special and actually identified themselves with men rather than with other women, their rise to the top did not pave the way for today's woman who wants a career in management. With their attitudes about themselves and other women, these women do not provide the aspiring managerial woman with the models she needs. To fill this gap, the authors offer some guidelines for the woman whose goal is a successful management career: 1. Develop a task-accomplishment orientation by deriving a sense of security not from ability to do every aspect of the task yourself, but from establishment of a clear and effective structure of goals, tasks, responsibilities and relationships, and an equally clear definition of performance standards. The authors explain that too many women in supervisory- level positions concentrate on being able to do the work and never develop a manager's sense of long-term planning or the ability to delegate authority to others. 2. In work relationships with men, always concentrate on the job to be done. If a male co-worker persists in treating you as a subordinate woman, do not respond. Eventually it will become clear that he is the problem, not you. And if you are a victim of sexual harassment, the authors advise you to keep records of every remark, gesture or threat and report them in writing. 3. Learn to manage your emotions. Expect that you will be challenged by male co-workers who will test your breaking point. Preparing in advance for such a challenge helps you to remain calm in the face of it. 4. On the subject of home work conflicts for the married career women, the authors write, "If both of you are pursuing demanding careers, a realistic discussion of the demands on each of you can lead only to the conclusion that household responsibilities have to be shared and, if it doesn't, you're going to need to reassess you own priorities entirely." 5. Rather than competing with other women, develop an old girls network. The authors explain: "As outsiders to the men's informal system, women need sources of support, advice and information beyond that system, and one of the most viable means of achieving this is a support group made up of other women." Hennig and Jardim have written an insightful and informative book that can be used as a manual by women who want successful management careers. This realistic look at the obstacles which beset the woman on her way to the top should provide women contemplating a move into management with answers to many of their questions and perhaps with the motivation to take that first step. Capitalist Patriarchy and the Case for Socialist Feminism Charley Kubricht Edited by Zillah R. Eisenstein, Ph.D. Monthly Review Press, 1978. 394 pages. $16.50. By Kathleen Williamson "Many socialist feminists were radical feminists first. They felt their oppression as women and then, as they came to understand the role of capitalism in this system of oppression, they became committed to socialism as well." -Zillah R. Eisenstein, Ph.D. A recent Time "special report" termed socialism "the dominant ideology of the 20th century," but went on to catalogue the failures of its many manifestations from Soviet Communism to Third World Marxism to the social democracies of northern Europe. Pragmatic Americans view socialism with mingled suspicion and longing: it seems a noble blueprint for egalitarianism that, once constructed, becomes a maze of totalitarian restrictions. Socialist feminism, however, as presented in the seventeen essays which comprise Capitalist Patriarchy and the Case for Socialist Feminism, owes less to Marxist theory than to a new feminist analysis of the daily struggles of women in production, reproduction and consumption. In a capitalist economy, a fraction of the population controls a majority of the wealth, profiting from the labor of others, and controlling what is produced and under what conditions. Patriarchy strictly divides labor and power into sexual spheres, thereby freeing men from a whole realm of work while denying women equal access to the labor force. . Socialist feminist philosophy has grown from formulating an alternative to these systems. Editor Eisenstein, Ph.D., an instructor of political philosophy at Ithaca College^, clarified the goals of the book's contributors at a recent seminar held in Houston: "...we realize that both the system of wage labor organized around the profit motive of a few which ghettoizes women's labor into the lowest paying work, and the sexual division of society which assigns women the work of the home for no pay are understood as part of the system of oppression. It is not a question of merely changing the laws for equal pay "It is not a question of merely changing the laws for equal pay or demanding wages for housework. We first need equal jobs." or demanding wages for housework. We first need equal jobs. We need to reject the household as our sphere of responsibility if we want. What we really need are jobs we want. And we need a system that will train us and which will also organize work so that it will be interesting and fulfilling, not merely cost effective." The essays differ in their emphasis and include such topics as: developing revolutionary strategy; the struggle for reproductive freedom; historical feminist socialism; and reports on the ongoing organization of socialist feminist groups in America. All are works of impeccable scholarship, without jargon or pedantry, but they presuppose some knowledge of political and economic theory. Though the lay reader may have to consult some basic political science texts for background, the effort will be rewarded. Nancy Hartsock, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Johns Hopkins Univers- sity, writing on "Feminist Theory and the Development of Revolutionary Strategy" stresses that: "Feminists argue that the role of theory is to take seriously the idea that all of us are theorists. The role of theory, then, is to articulate for us what we know from our practical activity, to bring out and make conscious the philosophy embedded in our lives." Reading these analyses of the unsatisfactory conditions of women in our society encourages all women to imagine alternatives for themselves in the home and in the labor market. The authors believe that further evaluations from many more women are needed before concrete plans for a new social and economic structure can be drawn up. The writings of these thoughtful women are intended as a basis for discussion and expansion among feminists everywhere. Eisenstein sets forth their ambition: "A strategy to reach all women has never been tried. That its implementation will be difficult goes without saying. But a beginning is already in process as women try to take some control over their lives." APRIL 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 17