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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 17
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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 17. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/240.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 17. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/240

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 17, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/240.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 17
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_539aq.jpg
Transcript >%*js7*w0a&>70' Bloomers and Ballots by Mary S. Clarke Viking Press, 1972 220 pages. $6.50. By Carolyn Cosgriff Elizabeth Cady Stanton grew up and lived in New York during the 1800's, a time when women were deprived of the right to their own property, their own wages, their own children, and even their own persons. It was a time when women could not do anything about it, if a man wanted to give their children away to some drunk to pay off a gambling debt. When Elizabeth was a child, sitting in her father's law office, she was infuriated when women came in beaten and crying and Mr. Cady had to tell them that there was nothing he could do because men had the right to do almost anything they wanted to their wives. When Elizabeth got older her brother Eleazer died. He was her father's pride and joy. Elizabeth, seeing this, decided to be just like a son to her father. She took up horseback riding (side saddle) and got her father to put her in a Greek class which was only for boys. After she got out of high school, she wanted to go to college but no college would admit a woman. The following summer Elizabeth went to stay at her cousin Gerrit's house who was a strong abolitionist. He was always having abolitionist guests over and that is how Elizabeth met Henry Stanton, her future husband. 1. She organized the first Women's Rights Convention. 2. She helped draft the Declaration of Sentiments which dramatized the legal grievances of women. 3. She introduced a resolution advocating suffrage for wo men-the first public demand by women for the vote. Elizabeth said on June 1, 1860, "My life has been one long struggle to do and say what I know to be right and true. I would not take back one brave word or "My only regret is that I have not been braver and bolder and truer in uttering the honest conviction of my soul." —Elizabeth Cady Stanton After their marriage, Elizabeth met Susan B. Anthony. No two people could be more devoted to their cause than Elizabeth and Susan, after they got together. They spoke all over the country. They told people the only way for women to have equal rights was through the vote. Elizabeth continued working, dedicated as ever, until she was eighty-seven. On her eightieth birthday, Elizabeth saw in the paper that it was declared Stanton Day in New York. Susan had prepared a big celebration for the event. Elizabeth was very suprised for she wasn't used to such praise since she had spent most of her life hurling thunderbolts at . the lawmakers.of the country. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was an outstanding figure in the history of Women's Rights. Some of her many contributions are: deed. My only regret is that I have not been braver and bolder and truer in uttering the honest conviction of my soul." I enjoyed this book very much. There were no pictures in the book, but at the end of each page there was a picture in my mind. The author went into much detail about the conditions of life at that time which made me realize how important this person was to have changed these conditions. Carolyn Cosgriff, age 12, is a freelance writer. She is in the sixth grade at West Memorial Junior High, Katy ISD. The Managerial Woman by Margaret Hennig and Anne Jardim Anchor Press/Doubleday, 1977. ' 221 pages. $7.95. By Cheryl Knott Every woman who thinks she wants a career in management should read The Managerial Woman by Margaret Hennig and Anne Jardim. This book explores some important differences between the conditioning of women and men, examines the backgrounds of 25 women who made it to the top, and counsels the reader on how she can succeed in management—if she is willing to pay the price. The price is high, as Hennig and Jardim are careful to point out. To make it in management the single woman must be willing to sacrifice her social life and the married woman must have an extremely understanding husband. Generally, the managerial woman must postpone marriage during her beginning years in the corporate world while she works long hours, takes continuing education courses and brings paperwork home in the evening. She should be prepared to prove in every new situation that she is capable, intelligent and unemotional, and that she has learned the business skills of gamesmanship, task accomplishment and risk-taking-skills that most boys learn in the process of growing up. The Managerial Woman looks at the differences in the way boys and girls are raised and at how those differences affect the woman who wants to succeed in the "man's world" of executive-level management. For instance, men grow up knowing they will have to work. Women, on the other hand, traditionally make career decisions in their late twenties and early thirties, a decade after the foundation of a management career is usually established. In pursuing the idea that men's and women's dissimilar upbringings create problems for career women, the authors asked some corporate executives: "If you had known on the day that your daughter was born, that starting at the age of 20 she would have to work continuously to survive, would you have done anything different?" One senior vice-president lowered his head, then looked up, staring but not speaking. After prompting, he finally responded, "I don't think, I feel sick to my stomach. If she has to work, then I've done it all wrong." As executives, these women felt more comfortable as the queen bee in a group of men, and they found other women boring or silly. 16 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH APRIL 1978