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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 15
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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 15. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/238.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 15. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/238

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 15, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/238.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 15
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_539ao.jpg
Transcript ACORN to City: Clean up your act! By Gary Allison Morey "Anyone of us could go down there to city hall and talk to them till we was blue in the face, and you know what they would do? Nothing. But when we go down there as a group, and they hear ACORN's coming, those politicians sit up and take notice." Lucille Martin got involved with the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) last summer when the City of Houston wanted to charge her $600 for a paving project that she and her neighbors did not want. They fought the project and won. Irene Tanner went to her first ACORN meeting in January. By February, she was leading ACORN's fight to increase the exemption on school taxes for senior citizens. Martin and Tanner worked together on that project, and won. "How would she and I have ever got together to work for the same cause without ACORN?" Martin asks. "She lives in South Park, I live in the Heights. Out in the Heights, we don't know what the problems are in South Park. If we didn't have an organization, how would we know we had the same problems?" ACORN is a league of 21 neighborhood organizations in low and moderate income communities throughout the Houston area that is fast becoming one of the city's most controversial and successful grassroots organizations. Issues range from op position to Southwestern Bell's rate hike (resulting in a decrease in phone rates last year) to installation of traffic signals at dangerous intersections. The membership of 2,000 families ranges from senior citizens in Acres Homes to young teachers and truck drivers in the East End. Eight of the 21 executive board members are women. Five of the 10 ACORN organizers are women, including the head organizer, Madeline Talbott. "Rich people have power in their poc- ketbooks. Poor and middle income people have power in numbers, when they're organized," Talbott says. "But first they have to believe in themselves." Eva Mick el from the Heights says that believing that she could lead a community group was not easy for her. "I've never held an office in any organization before," she explains. "When I had to go in front of city council to fight the tax increases, I was scared, and when I had to lead a news conference I nearly backed out. But I really wanted to get something done." ACORN members say they manage to win the involvement of many people like Eva Mickel who have never been active before. In some cases, that involvement brings a new awareness of how the political system works. "It's exciting," says Irene Tanner, co- chair of the South Park ACORN group. "I've been the spokesperson on senior ELECT Ben G. Levy JUDGE 247th DISTRICT FAMILY COURT : 25 years of experience practicing law — more than both his opponents COMBINED. Member of the Bar of United States Supreme Court United States Court of Military Appeals United States Court of Claims United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit United States District Court for Southern District of Texas Supreme Court of Texas and all other State courts Organizer and former Chairperson of Houston Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union. Veteran, United States Navy, World War II; and former Chairperson, Houston Committee to End the War in Viet Nam. ENDORSED BY Harris County Women's Political Caucus Harris County Democrats Political Alliance of Spanish-speaking Organization (PASO) Montrose Democrats Gay Political Caucus TEMPER JUSTICE WITH LEVY! Political advertisement paid for by Ben G. Levy Campaign Fund Steve Glaser, Chairman; Martin Elfant, Treasurer 2244 W. Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 ACORN menders EVA MICKEL, EMILY ROBERTSON and LUCILLE TANNER (1 to r) took Jack MeDaniel, (not shown) director of the City of Houston's Solid Waste Department, on a recent tour of trash-lined streets in the Third Ward. citizens' taxes, and ever since then, I read the papers more closely. Before I started working with ACORN, my husband used to complain about me not reading the paper. Now I pay attention to news so I'll know what I'm doing. I pay attention to every candidate that opens his mouth." If ACORN members are watching local officials more closely, those officials are also watching ACORN. And they don't always like what they see. In early April, a group of ACORN members took Jack MeDaniel, director of Houston's Solid Waste Department, on a tour of the trash-lined streets in the Third Ward. ACORN invited the news media. MeDaniel was furious. He thought he would be touring the East End with only one ACORN member. Trucks had been out in that section all week picking up the trash, according to ACORN members. But trash piles that had been sitting in the Third Ward for weeks were still there when the tour bus rolled by. MeDaniel cried foul play, claiming that he had been "suckered" into the tour. ACORN members argued that the only foul play was in the city's neglect of their inner city neighborhoods, and demanded improvements. They won some immediate funds for the leasing of additional trash and garbage trucks, as well as a commitment to publish pick-up schedules and rules in Spanish as well as English. But they say they are still working for their major goal, a regular monthly heavy trash pick-up in all neighborhoods. Direct confrontation with local officials is a common tactic for ACORN groups. It often nets some dramatic results, and it changes some members' views about issues and political candidates. "The city council got up and walked out on us," remembers Eva Mickel. "We were protesting the 300 percent increases in our property taxes. When Pearl Ford from Meadowbrook ACORN got up to ask for a reduction at the council meeting, all of the other 80 members stood up, too. Pearl didn't get to finish; the council wouldn't let her. So we all started singing Which Side Are You On and the council walked out. But they came back later and lowered our taxes even more than some of us had asked for." Lucille Martin explains that she has learned a lot about politicians from events like the tax protest. "When they walked out, that did it for me," she says. "I try to pick the candidates that's for the underdogs, the ones that's for the working class of people, since I've always had to work. But I never knew what these officials were really like until we started fighting the taxes. The River Oaks Country Club deal was a big factor for me. If it wasn't for getting in with ACORN, I wouldn't have known that when they was going up on my property tax more than double, they went down a million dollars on River Oaks' evaluation. We're out there in the Heights struggling with them just to get a traffic signal put up, but they can go out there and cut a million dollars off their taxes at the country club, and not even blink. Personally, I'd like to see every one of them get beat at the next election." ACORN takes partial credit for beginning to change some voting patterns in inner city neighborhoods. "It used to be, the candidates could play on racial feelings to get us to vote for them," says Emily Robertson, one of the ACORN board members. "They could take two lower income neighborhoods with the same interests, and have them voting against each other because one was white and the other black." According to Robertson, politicians still do that, but it doesn't always work as well as it used to. She points to the precincts in the largely white Heights that for the first time in many years voted the same way as those in black neighborhoods like South Park and Third Ward in the last mayoral run-off. ACORN had organizations in all three areas. "The people are not what they used to be," Robertson says. "We're organized and we're for real. Used to be, politicians could say one thing and do something else. Those days aren't gone, but with ACORN, they're going fast." JERRY mcafee ljyoJUDGE COUNTY CRIMINAL COURT NO. 8 14 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH APRIL 1978