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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 14
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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 14. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/237.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 14. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/237

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 14, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/237.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_539an.jpg
Transcript "I'm damned if I do and damned if I don't," seems to be the frustration of Anita Rodeheaver, candidate for Harris County Clerk. As Executive Assistant to County Clerk R. E. "Bob" Turrentine for 17 years, she's cast by some as being the same as the incumbent. But she says she's ready to make changes, primarily in personnel. When she has sought to rectify inequities for her women employees, Rodeheaver says, she's been told that's not her job. So, with several top positions in the Clerk's office soon to be vacated by retirement, she's as ready to clean house as her opponent, though she's also loyal to her current boss. This puts Rodeheaver in a position reminiscent of recent vice presidents who became candidates for president. Rodeheaver is little known in political circles outside the County Clerk's office. She says that's because Turrentine would not let his staff be involved in any campaign except his own. As a life-long registered Democrat, she says she's middle of the road, or moderate. She's very vocal about emphasizing that the County Clerk's office is a nonpo- litical one and feels it should be kept that way. The function of this office is to protect records, clerk for certain courts, and run elections. "We can't be politically involved," Rodeheaver says. On women's issues she is in favor of the Equal Rights Amendment, "or I wouldn't be where I am today," says Rodeheaver. "If someone is qualified and wants to do something, then she ought to do it and I think she ought to be paid the same money that a man is paid when he's doing the same job." "I've not only devoted so much time to the office, but to the county per se. I've chaired the County Employees Insurance Committee, going from a very poor insurance coverage to what we presently "I'm running a risk in running for this office...but I feel I owe something to the people in the office." —Anita Rodeheaver feel like is real, real good hospitalization. And we are continually working to make it better. "I'm running a risk in running for this office as far as the county is concerned... and the 17 years I've been with the county. But I feel I owe something to the people in the office. There are no safeguards for me as far as tenure is concerned. Asked what she wants to get across specifically to the readers of Breakthrough, she responded: "I feel all women should take a real hard look at the statistics, qualifications and what this office is. It's not a political office, but a really important one, with over $5 million a year in fees coming into the office. "I feel there's no way a person with minimal knowledge of the operations could come in and take over the office. "I've seen this office change from a bad situation to the most modern records keeping system in the state, if not the nation. I know it first hand." "You're better off if you just walked out of jail than if you didn't pay Foley's for five months." —Mary Woodall Creasy "When I got ready to run for state representative, Harris County Democratic Chairman George Buch told me my district votes Republican three-to-one and that I still had time to move to an area I could win in," says Mary Woodall Creasy who's running unopposed in the Democratic primary for the District 93 slot in the state house. Creasy was born into a political family. Her father served in the state House from Marshall while he was still in college. Some of her earlier political memories go back to Marshall when her father led Democrats for Eisenhower in 11 East Texas Counties. Her dad, Judge Ben Woodall, won 10 of those 11 counties for Ike, but he later lost his own race for county attorney, so at the urging of a friend he came to Houston to work as an assistant district attorney. Her father's leadership plus her own problems with divorce have perhaps helped crystallize some of Creasy's thoughts on social issues, particularly those considered by many to be women's issues. However, she admits she hasn't been actively involved in politics-formal or informal-in many years and she's never been active in "women's politics." She's particularly sympathetic to divorced women, displaced homemakers. "My heart goes out to women who have been married for 30 years when the man goes out on her, though more and more courts are awarding divorced women their husband's pensions." She's also disturbed that local credit bureaus can tag a person for seven years. This seems to become particularly critical in divorce cases. Though a federal law allows this tagging, she feels something could be done at the state level. "You're better off if you've just walked out of jail than if you didn't pay Foley's for five months." "One day, when I was sitting in my townhome in Alief, I received some literature from Milton Fox, published at state expense," which said he was especially pleased that in the past session of the legislature two of the four bills he introduced were passed. One of them banned bomb rockets in Harris County and the other put a tax on the common grounds of townhouses. She says that now means that people with townhouses are double taxed. "They're taxed on the value of the town- house and now, as a result of Milton Fox's bill, they get a separate tax bill from the school system on their swimming pools, their common grounds. "I was very unhappy about that and thought, 'gee, this is dumb,' and felt maybe I'd like to begin (my political career) as a state representative." SUPPORT STATE REPRESENTATIVE RON WATERS CHECK HIS VOTING RECORD. IT'S 100% FOR THE PEOPLE! RON WATERS HAS RECEIVED THE ENDORSEMENT OF EVERY POLITICALLY PROGRESSIVE ORGANIZATION IN THE STATE OF TEXAS! TEXAS WOMEN'S POLITICAL CAUCUS (TWPC) HARRIS COUNTY WOMEN'S POLITICAL CAUCUS (HCWPC) HARRIS COUNTY DEMOCRATS (HCD) 15th SENATORIAL DISTRICT DEMOCRATIC COALITION MONTROSE/ FOURTH WARD DEMOCRATS POLITICAL ALLIANCE OF SPANISH-SPEAKING ORGANIZATION (PASO) HARRIS COUNTY COUNCIL OF ORGANIZATIONS (HCCO) BAPTIST MINISTERS ASSOCIATION GAY POLITICAL CAUCUS (GPC) TEXAS STATE TEACHERS ASSOCIATION (TSTA) HOUSTON TEACHERS ASSOCIATION (HTA) AFL-CIO COMMITTEE ON POLITICAL EDUCATION (COPE) UNITED STEELWORKERS POLITICAL LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE FIREFIGHTERS LOCAL 341 TEXAS LEAGUE OF CONSERVATION VOTERS Political advertisement paid for by Ron Waters Re-election Committee James T. Evans, Treasurer; 205 E. 11th St., Houston, TX 77008 Joe Pentony DEMOCRAT FOR COUNTY JUDGE Chief Administrative and Legislative Office of the County Joe Pentony has an impressive record in public office. As a state representative in 1973 and 1975, Joe Pentony • Supported national and state ERA and opposed efforts to rescind. •Opposed introduction of legislation which would circumvent the 1973 Supreme Court ruling on abortion. •Supported increased funding for day care centers. •Supported Texas rape legislation. •Hired a woman or a minority person as his top aide. As County Judge, Joe Pentony will support •A county women's advocate. •Women for managerial positions in county government. In private life Joe Pentony is a plantiff in the suit to divide Houston into single-member City Council districts. He chairs the psychology department at the University of St. Thomas and holds a Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. Political advertisement paid for by Joe Pentony Campaign Committee Joe Pentony, Chairman; 3819 Fannin, Houston, TX 77004 APRIL 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 13