Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 13
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 13. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/236.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 13. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/236

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 13, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/236.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_539am.jpg
Transcript Guess who's running for office? By Donna Adair The May 6 primary will bring at least 12 women's names to ballots throughout Houston-Harris County. In keeping with its policy of alerting Breakthrough readers to women in politics-though not endorsing anyone- Breakthrough invited these 12 candidates to a special interview session Sunday, April 9. This was not a screening session. The women were asked just to talk about the office, their race. This was an opportunity for them to have their say as women to voters. The women running for public office in the Democratic primary, in alphabetical order, are Incumbent Elizabeth Armstrong from Lake Jackson for Member, State Board of Education, District 22 (unexpired term); Incumbent Alice A. Bonner for Judge, County Criminal Court No. 6; Laurice Carswell/or County Treasurer; and Mary Woodall Creasy for State Representative, District 93. She's unopposed in the De m ocra tic primary. Nell H. Hollo way for Judge, 312th Family District Court; and Incumbent Joe Kegans for Judge, 230th Judicial District Court. She's unopposed in both the primary and general election. Anita Rode heaver/or Harris County Clerk and Ruby Kless Sondock for Judge, 234th Judicial District Court. She's also unopposed in both the primary and general election. Incumbent Senfronia Thompson for State Representative, District 89 and Norma Mims Watson for State Representative, District 88. Also on the Democratic primary ballot, for political rather than public office, is Anne Greene. She's running for the party's county chairperson slot. In the Republican primary Jean H. Chernowsky is the lone female on the ballot. She's running for County Clerk. Bonner, Creasy, Holloway, Rodeheaver and Greene were interviewed by Breakthrough. Sondock and Keagan, unopposed, were not interviewed at this time. Armstrong was out of town. The other candidates did not respond. large slots to balance the delegations from precincts. "He testified that he didn't think the 'down-trodden minorities' supported the Democratic party." "I don't think that a man that feels like that can be neutral and bring the party together," Greene says. "I think this party is divided;it's split;and I think you need somebody up there chairing it that's going to try to get all these different groups to work together again to elect Democrats. Greene has lived in Harris County for 13 years and has been a member of the Democratic party for 12 years. She's served on the executive committee for precinct 200 and prior to that was an alternate to the committee. In Harris County she co-chaired the "Elect Bob Bullock Controller" campaign in 1974 before Mayor Fred Hofheinz appointed her the first female municipal court judge. Greene left municipal court because she wanted to practice law, although she still serves as an associate judge in that court. She's been in private civil law practice for five years. The main reason she decided to enter the race was that the person she wanted to support decided not to run, and no one else was running whom she thought she could support. "No one stood for what I thought needed to be done with the party," says Greene. She's been a member of NOW and the' Women's Political Caucus. And, although a municipal court judge at the time, Greene supported Nikki Van Hightower's fight against City Council and "made sure every member of Council saw me. "I think it's about time the public realized it's the women who are the ones really getting the vote out. I think they need to get more recognition for that. I'd like to encourage qualified women to run for political office." Asked if she's looking at this office as a stepping stone to another one, Greene replies, "I'm not seeking another office at this time. (I'm running because) I've been one of those people who feels shut out. I feel in close contact with those people. I feel it's time somebody got in there and ran an open party." "I don't see why being liberal should keep me from being a neutral chairperson any more than the ultra-conservative that is now in office and who wants to kick the blacks and Chicanos out of the party." —Anne Greene Anne Greene thinks that the function of a judge is to be neutral, and she thinks the function of the Democratic Party Chairperson is to be neutral-within the confines of the party. Greene describes herself as a liberal, or progressive, Democrat. She says she doesn't see why being liberal should keep her from being a neutral chairperson any more than the ultra conservative that is now in office and who wants to kick the blacks and Chicanos out of the party. "That to me is disgraceful if it is accepted by the people in the Democratic party, when traditionally those are the people that consistently support the Democratic party." Greene cites the testimony that the current chairperson, George Buch, made to the Winograd Commission, a commission of the National Democratic Party regarding party rules. "He didn't think it was fair that women should have 50% of a delegation, blacks one-third, and Chicanos 17%. He said he thought it was ridiculous to try to do that. "He didn't want to use delegate-at- Although six men are running against her, Alice Bonner has received all but one group's endorsement for the position of Judge, County Criminal Court No. 6. One of her opponents is a member of the lone non-endorsing group. She assumes so many men are running against her because "I seem most vulnerable. I'm black and female and this is a county-wide race. I couldn't raise the kind of money I need. That makes sense. One of them waited until the very last minute to file. My money is coming from the grass roots community." She feels she's the only one in the race with the necessary judicial experience. She's had more experience as a lawyer than three of her opponents and less than the other three. But she's been on the bench in her current position since appointment by the County Commissioners Court in June 1977. Prior to that she was a municipal court judge for 3V_ years. As she puts it, the municipal courts in Harris County are more than a "kangaroo court," so that experience should be considered. They're courts of record. She considers both the municipal court and the county criminal court to be "peoples courts" like the justice of the peace courts. "Many come there without counsel. They can't afford counsel so there are many opportunities for the judge to be of service. "I don't look at the people in this criminal court as 'criminals.' The type of cases that come in are such that it's their first brush with the law and usually the last." In response to critics who say she uses probation too much, Bonner says probation is a good tool for getting people back "I assume all these men are running against me because I seem most vulnerable—I'm black and female and this is a county-wide race." —Alice B. Bonner on the right track. "You can have a lot of stipulations in a probation. And you can help people." She gives the example of a woman who had about $8,000 to $10,000 in checks out. She'd been in jail for six months, was more than six months pregnant, had eight children, no husband, was on welfare and had no resources. "I insisted something be done. I placed her on probation with the condition that after the baby was born she enroll in a training program. I felt that someone smart enough to get by with all those checks should be smart enough to get a job and pull herself up, get back into the mainstream of life." She did. Nell Holloway is one woman who did have a female role model—back in the 1940's. At age 13 Holloway worked for a woman lawyer through a Business and Professional Women's program in her native Ada, Oklahoma. At that time it was work-for-free for the opportunity to work alongside a professional woman. After graduation from college at age 18 in 1949 she began working for the same woman. This time for pay and for a judge. Marriage and family postponed career goals a few years but Holloway always promised her daughter that she was going to law school as soon as her child was grown. That's what brought her to Texas in 1966. She heard she could go to South "No woman's ever won in Harris County yet. No incumbent's been defeated in 20 years, so 111 have a first if I do it. A real strong first." —Nell Holloway Texas Law School evenings. So, although she's been a practicing lawyer only since April 1972, Holloway, candidate for Family District Court No. 312, has been working in law for almost 30 years. In her brief career as a lawyer she's already in the process of making history with the Sims v. State Department of Public Welfare case which has prompted a three-judge federal court to rule that several provisions of the state's child abuse laws are unconstitutional. She donated 18 months of her time and $50,000 to working on this case. Holloway has been criticized for running against Judge Felix Salazar, the only minority member now in the family courts. She responds that she's running for an office for which there is a vacancy. "Whenever other women achieve, I say I'm so glad. I think there's a place for me, Alice (Bonner), Ruby (Kless Sondock), anybody else who wants to file. I think the day has come when the voter and the public are willing to accept a woman in the judiciary and we need them wherever." Concerning "Pro choice," Holloway has "religious convictions that may be different, but as to your right to control your own body function, I would defend it. Whether or not I could exercise that same right is beside the point." "I think the governor made a mistake when he made the last appointments, that there was not one woman. I was told by a judge before I filed that where women need to turn the screws is in the governor's office. I thought, 'No, not necessarily. What's wrong with filing and running?' "Of course, you understand, no woman's ever filed and won in Harris County yet. No incumbent's been defeated in 20 years, either, so I'll have a first if I do it. A real strong first." 12 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH APRIL 1978