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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 11
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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 11. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/234.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/234

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 11, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/234.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_539ak.jpg
Transcript county judge race • At issue: Harris County autonomy By Kathleen Williamson "Many people assume that the county judge office is strictly a judicial job, but that is not the case/' commented Teague Cavness, campaign manager for former Justice of the Peace Mike Driscoll. Dris- coll is engaged in polite competition with fellow Democrats Joe Pentony, Shawn Casey and Wayne Heinze for the chance to defeat Republican incumbent John Lindsay in the November general election. Joe Pentony, Ph.D., head of the psychology department at the University of St. Thomas, elaborated, 'The county judge is the chief administrative officer in county government and the presiding officer of the county commissioner's court." The county, as established in the Texas constitution, is an agency for the administration of matters of state concern such as collection of taxes, promotion of education, construction and maintenance of public highways, administration of justice, and care of the poor. The Texas Research League has reported that county government is inflexible: "Lacking any essential legislative powers, the county is forced to rely on existing state rules and regulation which are necessarily drawn in consideration of the interests of the entire state and not with a view toward the particular needs or preferences of the local community. "* So closely controlled are county activities that in 1919 the Legislature felt it necessary to authorize each commissioner's court to maintain a women's rest- room in the courthouse. This act has been amended no less than four times-the latest in 1951. In a city, by ordinance, a food purveyor can be required to have a sanitation certificate issued by the city health department, can be held subject to perio- to grant ordinance-making power only to Harris County would be his first project if elected. Casey and Driscoll discounted the need for county legislative ability. Driscoll has stated publicly that he is "totally opposed to more levels of government." Casey, son of former County Judge Bob Casey, charges that the issue is raised by "weak county judges" to excuse their 4 'inef fectualness." Pentony counters, "The first ordinance to be enacted should be an ethics "...the people of Texas...have at all times the inalienable right to alter, reform or abolish their government in such manner as they think expedient." —The Texas Constitution die inspections, can have his certificate revoked for violation of the health code, and thus may be prevented from doing business. The county health officer must rely on enforcement of State Health Department regulations which call for a judicial proceeding to halt any violations. "The unincorporated areas of the county have the right to restrict the sale of firecrackers or require that dogs be leashed," said Pentony. Special legislation ordinance requiring full financial disclosure of county officials. If you're against ordinance power, you're against an ethics ordinance." For Casey, an attorney making his first bid for public office, reform means ending "petty squabbling between certain officials which detracts from the efficiency of the government" and stepping in to fill the current "vacuum of leadership." Driscoll, a graduate of the University of Houston Law School, plans to increase county effectiveness by tackling urban problems. "For years the county has operated from a rural perspective, ignoring the fact that the county has grown tremendously, that crime in previously undeveloped areas of the county is rapidly increasing, that land available- for park use is rapidly disappearing, that the need for mass transportation will soon extend to every mile of Harris County, that our courts system is clogged and growing more crowded each year." Heinze agreed that traffic poses a tough problem, but " you can't force people to carpool or ride buses." He believes that staggered work hours coupled with volunteer workers to monitor signals at congested intersections could expedite the flow of traffic. A teacher of government with H.I. S.D., Heinze ran twice for the office of county judge as a Republican, but without success. He has switched parties to escape "inner-party politics" but avows that his conservative attitudes remain the same. "Spending has increased 360 percent in the last five years but the monies are not getting to the general public." Casey, Driscoll and Pentony all express their support of women's issues. Driscoll has a woman campaign manager, Teague Cavness. Casey's wife Suggie runs his office, and Rose Stranahan is Pentony's chief staffer. The Harris County Women's Political Caucus made no endorsement in the race. Top contenders Driscoll and EARL FARMER YOUR FULL TIME COUNTY TREASURER Earl Farmer, a Democrat, and formerly an administrative assistant with the county, has entered the race for the office of Harris County Treasurer. Earl has a solid background in money management from his experience in banking, city financing, and county government. He plans to run the office with honesty, dignity, and integrity. Earl Farmer takes pride in the fact that he respects people as individuals, and judges them on ability alone., not sex, race, creed, or personal preference. CAMPAIGN HEADQUARTERS If you would like further information or just want to talk with us, please feel free to call our headquarters! 1816 Effie Pasadena, Texas 472-7981 Paid for by Earl Farmer, Sharon G. Miller, Treasurer ' *__B__HR_^ _ - __ wm »*--■ m * __^^ * % __^^ i__l \ ^m i DESMOND E. GAY JUDGE HARRIS COUNTY CRIMINAL COURT AT LAW NO. 6 • MEMBER STATE BAR OF TEXAS • PRACTICING ATTORNEY FOR 25 YEARS • TRIED CASES IN ALL STATE AND FEDERAL COURTS % ENDORSED BY NORTH HOUSTON LAWYERS ASSOCIATION PAID FOR BY COMMITTEE TO ELECT DESMOND E. CAY, |UDGE P. DOWNING, CHAIRMAN 10 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH APRIL 1978