Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 10
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 10. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/233.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/233

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 10, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/233.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_539aj.jpg
Transcript "I'm going to go out knocking on doors for them." - Mark White White, 38, practiced law in Houston after graduation from Baylor law school in 1965. He then served a three-year term as assistant attorney general in the insurance, banking, and securities division. In 1969, he returned to private practice. Governor Dolph Briscoe appointed him secretary of state in 1973. He resigned that position in October, 1977 to campaign for attorney general. "This campaign boils down to one question, 'Can you trust the candidate?" White said in our interview. ''Price's word is not worth blowing up." Rapid-fire lists of Daniel's alleged lies follow, some going back to the emotion- packed finale of the 1974 Texas Constitutional Convention, over which Daniel presided. White quotes from a 1975 Texas Monthly which reports Rep. Craig Washington saying about Daniel, "I can't trust him." "I won't deny I said that, but you have to remember the temper of the times," said Washington. "Price and I are very good friends now. I'm Co-chairman of his Harris County Committee. Even if I didn't trust Price today, and I'm suppor- ing him in the campaign, where does that put Mark?" Washington also gives his viewpoint of another "lie." White asserts that if Daniel really were interested in the passage of a civil rights bill or human rights commission, he would have helped Senate Bill 558 pass the House when he was speaker. "Instead," White says, "the bill died in the House. Price didn't do anything to help it pass. He didn't do anything for women when he had a chance." "Not so," says Washington. "Price tried to convince me to help pass S.B. 558. He tried to convince me it was better to pass something than nothing. But I think you need something meaningful. S.B. 558 was a toothless dragon." White claims not to understand why the women's groups chose to support Daniel instead of him. He says he was never contacted. Mimi Purnell, state TWPC chair, has a slightly different story. She says she called White's office "quite frequently" to get the TWPC question - naire returned and to speak with the candidate before the screening. She never spoke with him. The questionnaire was returned unanswered with a half-page typed letter, unsigned. In that note, White stated that he had never been for the ERA publicly, but in private he was for it. Daniel, 36, is the son of Price Daniel Sr., a former House speaker, state attorney general, U.S. senator, governor (1957-63), now a Texas Supreme Court judge planning to retire at the end of 1978. The younger Daniel received his law degree from Baylor in 1966. He was elected to the House three terms and was elected speaker during his last term, 1973-75. He has practiced law in Liberty and taught it at several Houston schools. Houstonian James Baker III, unopposed on the Republican ticket, acknowledges he's the "underdog" in the race, but he has avoided a direct attack on either Democratic candidate. "He says it's time for voters to elect a Republican to the office traditionally held by the Democrats who dominate state government" says Jim Sicconi, Baker's issues coordinator and research director. "Independence of political power structures is his key campaign issue." "Also, he has vowed to oppose any federal controls on the price of intrastate gas in Texas and fight any attempts to allocate Texas' own state-owned royalty oil 'and gas," Sicconi says. PRICE DANIEL, JR FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL ATTORNEY GENERAL JIM BAKER FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL OF TEXAS Political commentators are saying that a Republican attorney general is a possibility this year - the first time in 102 years. Several factors make this possibility "realistic." There is no incumbent. Neither Democrat has run statewide before. The Democratic winner may be scarred by the divisiveness of the primary. John Tower, a proven vote getter, is at the top of a strong Replubican congressional ticket — and his race against either Christie or Krueger might draw a lot of interest. In an "off-year" (non-presidential) election, the party out of power traditionally does well. If the race is Baker against Daniel, there will be a slight ideological gap. Jimmy Carter's popularity on November 7 might be a burden to Democrats. The Texas electorate is changing, especially in Houston, with the great influx of people of which many are not committed to one-party politics. —J. MeC. On women's issues particularly, Baker "supports equal rights for women and will work to see that the present law guaranteeing those rights is enforced. He feels that the present law is adequate to protect those rights without the necessity of amending the constitution of the United States. And he points out that the National Organization of Women (sic) has acknowledged that the effect of an equal rights amendment would be mainly symbolic, that there would be just a minimal practical effect. He questions whether the symbolic effect merits an amendment to the Constitution," Sicconi explains. No matter which candidate wins the May 6 primary, there promises to be a real contest in November between the Democratic winner and well-financed Baker. Furthermore, Baker is a strong candidate with unified Republican backing. A fourth-generation Texan and fourth-generation lawyer, he is a graduate of Princeton, with a law degree from the University of Texas. He has 18 years experience in a large Houston law firm, seven of those as managing partner helping to administer an office of 100 lawyers. Baker bills himself as a non-political lawyer, but he has impressive political experience. He spent nine months as U.S. Commerce Undersecretary (1975-76) before he took over then-President Ford's 1976 delegate hunt and, later, the entire Ford campaign. Fred Moore Reynolds, an Independent from Pasadena, may also appear on the November ballot. He has not officially qualified as yet but he's still gathering signatures. A lawyer in Houston since 1963, he previously served in the army and the counter-intelligence corps. He believes that the ERA, "if enforced, would tear up our whole society. Once you grant someone special rights you deprive another group their rights. You start setting up quotas. No one should have preferential treatment by law. We have the ERA here in Texas, but the courts have a- voided the interpretation of it. They have skirted around the issues. I don't believe the courts will ever interpret it." The attorney general's race has been called the "real sleeper" in this year's elections. "The job is important because, as the state's chief lawyer, the attorney general interprets the laws that the state passes, enforces laws already on the books," says Judith Guthrie. "The concerns of the attorney general have important consequences for women." t>i&# i*1$ && POL. AD. PAID FOR BY THE DICK JENKINS CAMPAIGN FUND. '2821 EASTGROVE LANE 77027. GEORGE MOODY, TREAS. Endorsed by Harris County Women's Political Caucus fl*** Louis Moore 263rd District Judge Evaluated as "Qualified" to serve as Judge By Judicial Evaluation Committee of the Houston Bar Association — 1975 First, Second or Third Choice for Judge By Houston Bar Association, Harris County Suburban Lawyers Association and Houston Lawyers Association — 1972 26 years legal experience — Good reputation Respected hard working trial and appellate lawyer Member.- American Bar Association, Texas Bar Association, Houston Bar Association, Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, Association of Trial Lawyers of America and Houston Trial Lawyers Association. Served on HBA Judiciary Committee, Bylaws Committee, Bar Candidate Committee and Lawyer Referral Service Committee — Recent award for exceptional service in 1977. Outstanding record for community service. Former board member Houston Association of Children with Learning Disabilities — Greater Houston Chapter, National Society of Autistic Children — Legal advisor and Board Member of Planned Parenthood of Houston (1971-73) recipient of the Margaret Sanger Certificate of Appreciation, Planned Parenthood Federation of America in 1972 — Inspector of Elections for Harris County. 56 years old — married — 4 children — active in church work and Scouting. Navy Fighter Pilot, World War II Competent, Conscientious, Concerned, Fair, Dedicated. Pol. Adv. paid for by Dorthy Curlee on behalf of Louis Moore, 400 Houston Bar Center Bldg., Houston, Tx. 77002, Bertrand Moser, Campaign Treasurer. APRIL 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH