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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 9
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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 9. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/232.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 9. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/232

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 9, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/232.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 9
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File Name femin_201109_539ai.jpg
Transcript attorney general's race Courting the women's vote By Judith McClary The candidates in the attorney general's race, more than any other primary contenders, are speaking directly to women. Price Daniel Jr. and Mark White Jr., the two Democratic frontrunners, are courting the women's vote. Calling your opponent a "weak sister," however, is not going to win votes from the sisterhood. Mark White slipped this gaffe into an interview reported in the April 16, 1978, Houston Post: "All he [Price] has got so far is his daddy's name and Billie Carr [a liberal Democratic leader] . He's a weak sister." Perhaps he should stick to lines like the one in his Breakthrough interview, "When tense times came, he [Price] hid like a little rat," which might keep his offensive- ness to four-legged mousy types. Despite the occasional slips, both men have influential women supporters. Dr. Hortense Dixon, former executive assistant to Fred Hofheinz, supports Mark White. Price Daniel, Jr. has the backing of a 75-member group, Women Across Texas (WAT), which includes such political pros as Ann Richards and Helen Copitka. On April 4, WAT representatives and other Daniel supporters forming the ad- hoc Women's Political Action Coalition (WPAC) met with the candidate to begin the dialogue about women's issues. The agenda was a six point summary of the most vital of these issues. Attorney Judith Guthrie questioned Daniel about possible conflicts of interest between his support of women's issues and his representation of state agencies being sued by women. Representing state agencies has been stated by Daniel to be one of the most important functions of the attorney general's office. A primary concern of the group was that the attorney general uses his influence to keep state agencies out of the courts and complying with the laws, preparing affirmative action programs, following hiring policies consistent with EEOC guidelines. "We're being screwed on both ends." said Helen Copitka. "We can't get in the door, and then our taxes are paying to keep the door closed." "I want your views," Daniel said. "I want you to help me be a good attorney general. I need you to help me get elect ed. I need your advice, your consent, and your encouragement—and 111 probably need your prodding from time to time." The group recommended training programs, instituted through the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration, that would deal with civil rights, rape, family crisis intervention, battered women, and child abuse. "We would like to see you use your position as attorney general to institute programs that would address these issues, establish guidelines for agencies so they are not hauled into court," Copitka said. On the issue of jobs, Daniel said, "As attorney general, we open doors for women." He said that he advocates the setting up of a Human Relations Commission. Nikki Van Hightower responded, "It has to be something with teeth in it or it just becomes another stumbling block." Both Daniel and the coalition agreed that teeth are also needed for an effective Open Meetings Act, a piece of legislation passed during Daniel's reform-era term as House speaker. "You should be aware of my strong stance on openness," said Daniel. "I think the statute is well drawn, but it has problems of enforcement. It needs amendment, penalty provisions." WPAC spokesperson Copitka said after the meeting, "We support Daniel for several reasons. Mainly, our endorsement is based on his past record." While serving in the Texas House, Daniel voted for the passage of the state and federal ERA; he opposed recission efforts; he appointed women and minority House members to serve on committees; he established the House EEOC office and appointed a woman as the first EEOC officer (this office was abolished when his successor Billy Clayton took office); he employed women in key legislative committee staff positions and on his campaign staff. "I've always worked for women's rights," Daniel said in a recent interview with Breakthrough. "Women know my continuing commitment and what we've done. I believe in equal opportunity and will go on fighting for it. Before (his term as House speaker), if you were a woman or a black, a Mexican American, a Republican, you could just forget it as far as getting an important committee or staff assignment." "Fortunately for me-1 mean the state," said Daniel in our recent interview, "the citizenry became aware of the Dirty 30 (at the time of the Sharpstown scandal, Texas' Watergate) and I ran and won the speakership on a platform for permanent reform-to open the system up. This happened with the ethics and financial disclosure act; the campaign finance disclosure act; the open meetings act; the open records act; and the lobby registration and control act. Also, I ran the House as a deliberative body. I ran for only one term and retired voluntarily." The Texas Women's Political Caucus (TWPC) has endorsed Daniel. Harris County WPC Chair, Joyce Cragg says, "Price has always kept his word. He's very concerned with and sympathetic to women's issues and will do something about them. I believe in the man." Mark White launched a mail campaign to 10,000 women across Texas to solicit the women's vote. In this letter, signed by six women lawyers, educators and professionals, he asserts that he had an outstanding record of equal employment practices as secretary of state, especially in placing women in supervisory roles. Then he lists 13 women who worked in his office, primarily as a result of his extensive recruiting and upward mobility programs. Terry Goodman, director of the Enforcement Division in the Secretary of State's office since April, 1973, and the first woman to hold that job, says, "I took this position because it gave me a chance for more responsibility, higher salary and better title. I'd been working in another government office for eight years. White's payroll is a matter of pub- he record. He gave women an opportunity to have positions of authority and responsibility. As an office holder, he had an outstanding record for wo men-and I'm an example. He treated me always just like other division directors. I was in the job because I was an attorney. I never felt like a token." She added that she's been interested in the women's movement for a long time. "No other candidate for attorney general can point to this kind of equal employment record," White's letter continues. In person, the candidate is more specific, saying, "I've practiced equal opportunity, while Price has only given it lip service. I have a record; he doesn't. He never hired a woman above clerk-typist for his personal House staff. "Daniel says he'll have an 'open-door' policy for women. Well, I'm going to go out knocking on doors for them," White added. "I'll have an open door policy for women." —Price Daniel, Jr. The other important point White makes to his women constituency is his reputation for integrity, honesty and fair dealing. The letter reads, "We know that if Mark White pledges to advance the role of women in Texas, he will keep his word as attorney general, just as he did while serving as secretary of state." As Texas' chief elections officer, former Secretary of State White says he promoted numerous revisions of election laws and established what he calls a "reasonable and enforceable" campaign finance and financial disclosure system. He says he was responsible for creating the Texas Register, a publication to inform citizens of new and proposed state agency regulations, including the telephone number and address of the official to whom protests and complaints should be addressed. This procedure has been adopted by the Federal Register. White claims that his office returned some $4 million of its approximately $20 million budget back to the general revenue fund, even though a new division was created. His supporters point out that this efficiency saved money which could then be used for child care and other concerns vital to women. In his Breakthrough interview, White said, "I took the (secretary of state) job because I thought it was a chance to help cure some of the things I'd always complained about, like government wastefulness and inefficiency. I've never felt like a politician. KEEP JUDGE SALAZAR 312th District Court Proven Public Service • Judge, 312th District Court Judge, Court of Domestic Relations Municipal Court Judge Assistant Probate Court Judge Assistant County Attorney Assistant Attorney General of Texas, heading the District Office in Houston Practicing Attorney, Harris County, 24years POLITICAL ADVERTISING PAID FOR BY JAY W. BURNETT CAMPAIGN TREASURER. 609 FANNIN. HOUSTON, TEXAS. MIKE NOBLET DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 79 Paid for by Mike Noblet Campaign Fund, Dennis Sucec, Treasurer, Houston, Texas 77006 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH APRIL 1978