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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 6
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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 6. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/229.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/229

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 6, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/229.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 6
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_539af.jpg
Transcript JOHN HILL brings his campaign to Cluny Homes near Texas Southern University's Campus. Hill recently spent a day touring shopping centers and housing projects to talk with voters. equal rights and equal opportunity." But the best Hill could manage before the state's AFL-CiO was a draw-"praise" for Hill and a "recommendation" for Briscoe. And in Houston, the blacks, too, are split. The Harris County Council of Organizations and the Black Organization for Leadership Development went for Hill, two black ministers' groups for Briscoe. A wild-card factor is what Texas Monthly has called the race's "mini- scandal." The Governor's Office of Migrant Affairs is being investigated for massive inefficiency by the Travis County district attorney, with the help of Hill's assistants. It has spent $3.9 million but found jobs for only 384 workers. Briscoe has retaliated with an audit of Hill's organized crime task force, which technically is also part of the governor's office. It has infuriated Hill since it forced him to withdraw his top investigator from the GOM A task force. Hill has reached that political plateau of "cautious optimism," but in a state where Pappy O'Daniel and Ma Ferguson can win, anything can happen. Which brings us to the weirdo candidates in the Democratic primary. Preston Smith of Lubbock, an arch-conservative whose governorship (1969-73) one would have thought would make even Briscoe's act look good, is trying to see how many Texans are foolish enough to want to return him to office-possibly enough for a runoff. Then there's Ray Allen Mayo, a transplanted New Yorker who is on a hunger strike to dramatize his beef that Hill and Briscoe are advocating "too much socialism." Finally, we have Donald R. Beagle of Nederland, a leader in Men's Equality Now International, a group interested in child custody for divorced men. There is another game in Texas. It's called the Republican primary. It pits state party chairman Ray Hutchison of Dallas against Bill Clements, a Dallas industrialist who is spending oodles of money on the battle. Despite Hutchison's friction with national GOP leaders, for such things as boycotting a Houston fundraiser key- noted by Panama Canal "give-away" supporter Sen. Howard Baker of Tennessee, and despite his ill-fated 1976 support of Gerald Ford over Ronald Reagan, Hutchison knows and has many friends among party regulars. As Texas Monthly's Paul Burka points out, Clements, Ford's deputy defense secretary, is in no position to capitalize on the Jerry-Ronnie point. A third and unknown Republican, Clarence Thompson of Fort Worth, is believed to have no bearing on the race. There is one thing about Texas' Republicans worth liberals' consideration; it's an argument that comes up nearly every election. It runs like this: Texas is decidedly a one-party state, Democrat, and as a result, liberals don't have as much power as they might. Libs may run in the primaries, but they nearly always lose to conservative Democrats. So, the devious liberal says, let's teach those backward pols a lesson and vote even more reactionary, namely Republican, and hope they win. That way, the theory goes, the conservatives will see a party more to their ideological liking has a chance. But that scheme, aimed at encouraging switches by the Democrats' most right- wing members to give the liberals a better chance at nominating one of their own next time, is best considered in November. sometimes wont to call themselves, are a- gain in a quandry. As The Texas Observer points out, "The prospect (of Hill as governor) bothers some progressives, who fear that Hill is, at bottom, a smart, aggressive conservative, potentially far more dangerous than the bumbling, witless Dolph Briscoe." But if Hill is not a bona fide progressive, he is at least open to innovation. And, importantly, Hill is a "viable" candidate. The polls, of which there have been many, some tainted by pollsters' support of Hill, show Hill ahead or neck and neck. Hill is an adept politician and has been able to whittle down his opponent's support in some key areas. A trip to Washington to talk to striking Texas farmers did much toward neutralizing one of the governor's strongest blocs. Hill has won support-and money— from some mainly conservative sources, too. Two big Houston law firms political action committees, those of Baker & Botts and Vinson & Elkins(John Connal- ly's firm), have given about evenly to Briscoe and Hill. But Dolph was able to raise with one ranch gathering as much as Hill's entire war chest-$1 million. And Briscoe got the big bucks from such outfits as the Texas Real Estate Political Action Committee and the Texas Medical Political Action Committee. For Hill to win, he will have to carry handily the liberals and the big city vote, most experts agree. That could be a problem. Hill has won the endorsements of the Texas State Teachers Association (for support of pay equal to the national average) and the Texas Women's Political Caucus. Hill's women's support group is considerably more potent than the Briscoe Ladies. And the Caucus' vice chairperson, Anita Lang, said "Hill has shown over and over again his commitment to ELECT ji^i-__k Nell H. j^****n HOLLOWAY w JUDGE 312th Family District Court m \ Endorsed by Harris County AFL-CIO Practicing Lawyer * Mother * Grandmother 29 Years Full-Time Work Experience Only Woman Candidate for Judge Of Our 12 Family Courts m I WE NEED A WOMAN JUDGE ON OUR FAMILY COURTS! Political Advertising paid tor by Campaign to Elect Nell H Holloway tor Judge 3t?th Family District Court Robert W Cook Treasurer 1133 Bayiand Houston Texas 77009 a lawyer, a judge, an experienced Democratic leader. Endorsed by: Women's Political Caucus Harris County Democrats PASO Women's Lawyers Association Montrose/Fourth Ward Democrats Gay Political Caucus Senate Dist. 15 Democratic Coalition 2500 West Loop South, Suite 480 Houston, TX 77027 713/966-0251 APRIL 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH