Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 5
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 5. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/228.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/228

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 5, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/228.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_539ae.jpg
Transcript no new taxes, no new issues Election time is compromise time By Red Zenger He's no Sissy Farenthold. But then he's no Dolph Briscoe, either. John Hill may not be the progressive's dream, but at least he has made the 1978 governor's contest a real horse race. To be sure, election time is compromise time once again for liberals. But Hill has made one choice clear. The choice is between an activist and a caretaker governor. To refresh your memory, Hill is running against gentleman rancher Dolph Briscoe, the biggest landowner in the state, and his wife Janey. They have served together as governor six years, and if the Briscoe team completes another four-year term, Texas will have had Gov. Do Nothing in office longer than any other in the state's history. Hill has a fair shot at winning, but there are still an awful lot of Texans who view the best governor as the one they hear from least. Dolph certainly fills the bill. According to an Associated Press survey, Briscoe missed 68 full working days in 1977. The year before, the AP noted he had the dubious honor of having the fewest press conferences of all the nation's governors. Besides making his ubiquitous promise of no new taxes and appointing dead people to state commissions, the only official duty the conservative seems to have taken upon himself is to make sure an outrageous portion of the state's treasury continues to go for highways. "The governor's office is not the least bit interested in what the Legislature is doing," says Rep. Bill Sullivant, a third- term Democrat from Gainesville. "Dealing with Briscoe's office was like trying to deal with Howard Hughes," says Rep. John Hostenbach, the Odessa Democrat. Another peeved legislator, Wayne Peveto, Democrat of Orange, sums up Briscoe's tenure thusly: "The governor delivers his opening message in January, and we don't see him again until the last night of the session, in May, when he comes around and tells us what a great job we've all done." As an advocate in Washington, Briscoe has failed miserably, having virtually no impact on national energy and agriculture policies. The state coffers continue to bulge with a budget surplus-at least $700 million will be lying around next year. And from education to tax reform, the pressing issues of 1978 are the same as the pressing issues of 1972, when Briscoe was first elected. "Gov. Briscoe is the first candidate I can recall who advertises his failures in campaigning for re-election." Hill has said. mmm cBdb cEckhardt TEXAS' TOP CONGRESSMAN Bob Eckhardt Has Received Texas' Top Ratings From: ■» Texas Monthly (with Mahon) - AFL-CIO, For Job Protection • NAACP, For Racial Justice (with Jordan) ■ National Education Association ■» National Senior Citizens' Council Paid for by Bob Eckhardt Campaign Fund. J. Edwin Smith. Treasurer JANEY BRISCOE and GOV. DOLPH BRISCOE are greeted by Dr. John Coleman (to left of couple) at the opening of the Briscoe Campaign headquarters in Houston's Third Ward area. The building is owned by Dr. Coleman, The Texas A&M regent appointeed by Briscoe last year. But can progressives enthusiastically support Hill? The trouble with John Hill is that he has more in common with Dolph Briscoe than his liberal supporters would care to admit. When The Houston Chronicle asked their three top priorities, Hill and Briscoe gave almost identical lists, naming education, tax relief and crime. And Hill also vows no new taxes. Like Briscoe, Hill, 54, of Houston is a multi-millionaire Establishment Texan. On some issues he is actually more conservative than the incumbent. For example, Hill believes taxing intangible property, like stocks and bonds, is infeasible. Briscoe is willing to give it a try. Hill won't take an obvious back seat to Briscoe on highway spending. The challenger told the Chronicle, ''Allocation of highway funds must be based* on the needs of the citizens, meaning the needs of citizens to travel between cities as well as within them." Both candidates are graduates of "The University" and think it's just fine the state constitution makes special funding provisions for the University of Texas and Texas A&M University. And John Hill is quick to explain to business that he is not a liberal. Still, Hill has compiled a reasonably good record as attorney general since 1973 (he also served as secretary of state from 1966 to 1968). He hasn't shied from taking on Southwestern Bell over telephone rates. (He won.) Twice he was named the best statewide official by the Texas Consumer Association. He has been tough on pollution violators, winning a $150,000 judgment against Brown & Root for destroying oyster beds in Brazoria County. Hill has also brought the AG's office to "the people," opening five regional offices for his 165 assistants, who, by the way, include 43 women. But Hill has made mistakes. Perhaps not to rile the state's black establishment, he had his lawyers support the autocratic Texas Southern University administration when it tried to fire faculty troublemakers with tenure. (He lost.) And in Washington, his efforts have often been to protect the state from reform. He argued before the Supreme Court on behalf of Texas' death penalty. And at the Railroad Commission's re-' quest, he filed suit to block enforcement of tough, new federal strip mining regulations here. So progressives, as Texas liberals are hous'ov'kol'man n. 1. A woman-owned business specializing in quality graphics and printing. 2. A large red brick house in the heart of Montrose. - adj. Having many and varied features. - v. Producing design, illustration, camera work, printing and bindery. - adv. 1. To increase the client's business manifold. 2. To satisfy the client. House of Coleman 901 West Alabama -Houston 77006 -(713) 523-2521 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH APRIL 1978