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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 4
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Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 4. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/227.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/227

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 4, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/227.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_539ad.jpg
Transcript The Barbara Jordan seat Who deserves to win? Barbara Jordan rose to national prominence as the representative from Texas' 18th Congressional District. She is not running for reelection and interest in the race to be her successor extends to the national level. The seven candidates aspiring to Jordan's place in Congress are Anthony Hall, Mickey Leland, Jack Linville Jr, Judson Robinson Jr, Harrel Tillman, Al Vera and Nathaniel West. -By Maxine McCall Atlas- A recent comment by a local liberal state representative seems appropriate to this campaign. "In this political system, unless we start completely over, politicians accomplish their goals through wheeling and dealing. Our government runs on a buddy system. The thing one must decide is whether a politician is stepping too far over the line in their dealing when it comes to human needs versus political needs. " -M.M. A. Why did this man coddle up to Dolph Briscoe? ANTHONY HALL "My voting record," says Anthony Hall, "shows I am in support of equality and justice. My public positions can't be criticized. I am asking people to judge who has been effective and productive." Hall is serving his third two-year term as state representative for southeast Houston's District 85, and is basing his campaign on a record of achievement. "Abortion should be a personal issue for all women," says Hall. He believes public funding should be available, just as it should for all health care. Hall says it was unfortunate that the Houston Women's Advocate position was abolished. "It had become symbolic to the question of women's rights and it was a mistake to eliminate it, but a Women's Advocate is not the only way to achieve women's rights. "My history is adequate testimonial to my stand on women's issues," claims Hall. "Because there are many single-parent families in the 18th Congressional District," Hall says, "it is especially crucial, an economic necessity and a question of survival, that we provide adequate child care facilities for everyone. It should be the joint function of federal and local governments." "The federal government should assume a greater share of the financial responsibility of assisting in the educational process," says Hall. "Houston has dealt miserably with educational desegregation, which is the key to quality education. With a diverse student body there is a greater concern of everybody for quality. This is the key to making better housing and transportation equally available to everyone." Hall skirts the question of why he did not support Sissy Farenthold in her last campaign for the Democratic nomination for governor. "When I first went to Austin in 1972 73, a prime black concern was black political appointments in the state. It had been an issue in the campaign. I went there intending to get some input with whomever was governor in order to get more black appointments. I have worked with the governor's office in order to achieve this kind of input, and pledge to continue to do so. I have done the same for black women," says Hall. "Hall is seen as one who coddles the establishment," says one political observer. An article in the May 24, 1974, issue of the Texas Observer reported that Hall told the Black Professional and Business men's Organization that he realized all of his pet legislation had to be signed by Briscoe. "That makes it an extra special plea sure that I stand up here, because I've got some bills I want passed and I want signed. It's as simple as that." (continued on page 27) MICKEY LELAND The question Mickey Leland says he would like his opponents in this campaign to answer honestly is "How really devoted are you to humanity?" Leland has represented State Legislative District 88 since 1972. "I am strongly in favor of the women's movement," says Leland. "It has detracted somewhat from the drama of the civil rights movement, but people have the right to raise the level of their education and become activists in the pursuit of their own rights. Many blacks were somewhat insulted by the rise of the feminist movement and became reserved about their own movement. When there is no longer a visible concern on the part of the media, some activists withdraw," he says, but the civil rights movement is not over." During Sissy Farenthold's last campaign against Briscoe for the Democratic nomination for governor, Leland joined Craig Washington as Farenthold's Harris County campaign coordinators. A local feminist-activist says, "Support or non-support of Sissy Farenthold in '72 and '74 shows where they (the candidates) come from. Some put a lot on the line to support Sissy, and Mickey did." She rates Leland as, "the very best on women's issues." Another knowledgeable source says, "Mickey has sought out what women are concerned about." Would Leland work for extension of the deadline for ratification of ERA? "Sure," he says. "I've been fighting the Pink Ladies for years." One of Leland's critics says, "Last session Mickey Leland followed Billy Clayton wherever he went. Why is he sidling up to Clayton, who voted against ERA?" In the last race for Speaker of the Texas House, Billy Clayton, a conservative from west Texas, won because some liberals were so offended by the abrasive personality of his liberal opponent, Carl Parker. Leland was one of them. Sources say a plane load of liberal legislators flew to Springlake, Texas (Clayton's home) where they "cut some kind of a deal with Clayton." They were apparently rewarded for their support with appointments to chair house committees. Mickey was given the Appropriations Committee, Ben Reyes a seat on the Rules Committee, and Craig Washington chair of the Jurisprudence Committee. But Clayton stacked the key committees with rural conservatives, making it impossible for the liberals to pass any progressive bills in their own committees. (continued on page 27) Why did this man sidle up to Billy Clayton? Why did this man praise Herman Short? JUDSON ROBINSON, JR. "Persons who are leading tnis country are going to have to be persons who have had some basic experience," says Judson Robinson Jr. He regards himself as a "brick and mortar" person and sees his strong business background as an important qualification for his candidacy. Robinson is president of Judson Robinson and Sons Real Estate, Mortgage and Insurance Co, owns a Burger King franchise, and is part owner of KCOH radio in Houston. He is in his fourth term and seventh year on the Houston City Council. He was the first black elected to the council. Robinson surveyed the district and found the primary concerns of the voters to be upward mobility; safety in the streetsand home; the lack of energy and its spiralling cost; adequate, safe and cheap transportation; educational opportunities; and upgrading neighborhoods. "These are the things people talk to me about," Robinson says. Robinson, whose family is one of the wealthiest in Houston's black community, says "As a minority person who had to struggle for the rights of our people, I wholeheartedly endorse the rights of all people, including the predominantly middle-class, white women of the feminist movement. We are all talking basically about the same things-all rights of all people. I see feminism as another added tool to tear down the walls of segregation and inequality." Robinson voted to keep the Women's Advocate position in Houston. "It finally dawned on me, he says, "that the ladies in the audience were talking about the same things we in minority groups were talking about for years." However, he also voted to reduce the salary of the Wo men's Advocate to one dollar a year. Robinson cites intense pressure from the Catholic community, stemming from Nikki Van Hightower's support of abortion, as the primary reason for that vote. On abortion Robinson says, "As a Catholic, it is part of my religion that I personally would not want my wife to have an abortion; but as an elected official, I believe in the right of every woman to make that her decision." He favors providing funds for those who need it and would support legislation guaranteeing these funds for those persons needing it the most. In 1972, two months after he was elected to the city council for the first time,' Robinson outraged the black community when he told reporters that Police Chief Herman Short was a "sincere and dedicated" man who probably does not deserve the image he has in the black (continued on page 27) APRIL 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH