Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 3
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 3. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/226.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/226

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 3, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/226.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_539ac.jpg
Transcript nikki van hightower CLOUT By all indications, women have broken a new barrier. They are now recognized as a voting bloc by political aspirants. Such recognition has important implications. It means that women are being regarded as having group identity and interests. It means they are now seen as having enough "clout" to make their support worth pursuing. The bottom line is that women's rights issues are being incorporated into candidates' platforms. The American electoral process emphasizes winning. It de- emphasizes ideology. Politicians do not typically incorporate issues of interest groups into their platforms without expecting payoffs in either votes or money. Until women organized effectively on their own behalf, politicians were reluctant to be identified with their interests. There were some powerful myths and stereotypes to overcome before women could receive political recognition. The strongest and most insidious was that all women vote like their husbands. In other words, there were only men's interests. It was also assumed that fewer women voted than men and that they were not as interested in politics. In the political beehive, men were the "queen bees" and women the "drones." During this election, the support of women's rights groups and activists has been openly sought by candidates for all major statewide and local offices. Attorney general candidates Price Daniel, Jr. and Mark White have active women:s support and fund raising groups. Gubernatorial aspirant John Hill has his Women on the Hill Side. And even the incumbent has his Briscoe Ladies. The natural reaction in this election is to devote time and energy to the more visible offices. However, I offer a word of caution. Women cannot afford to ignore the less visible offices, particularly the judgeships. These are the people that women have to face in divorce trials, rape cases and child custody hearings. Judges are not, and probably never have been, dispassionate appliers of the law. Their backgrounds, personalities, attitudes and beliefs enter into each decision. Women must be familiar with these individual characteristics. This is no easy task. Because it is so difficult for all citizens, there has long been debate over whether judges should be appointed or elected. The case for appointment is that merit qualifications could be established, and only the most qualified selected. But who would make the appointments? The governor? The Texas Bar Association? An "impartial" commission? Who would select the commission members? None of the alternatives bode well for women because there is little chance of their having a voice in the selection process. Imperfect as it may be, I still opt for battling it out at the polls. The Harris County Women's Political Caucus screens all candidates. Anyone is welcome to join the Caucus, participate in screening and making endorsements of candidates. For all people concerned with women's rights, those endorsements can serve as guidelines for making electoral decisions. It looks as if women have reached the walking stage in politics. That is, women have gained recognition as a viable political interest group. Stage two is learning to run. Breakthrough readers are voters. The fact that 94% of you voted in the last election* did not go unnoticed by candidates running for public office. (Notice the campaign advertising in this expanded issue). Clearly, candidates want your vote. At Breakthrough we felt the need to provide you with solid news stories-informing not endorsing. A team of writers worked on the major races. Intrepid Red Zenger is back reporting with slings and ar rows on the 1978 Texas Governor's race. Journalist Barbara Karkabi recently interviewed Jehan Sadat, the prime minister of Lebanon, and other notables in the Middle East, so we turned her loose on the 18 candidates for the U.S. Senate and Congressional races. She placed hundreds of phone calls. Everyone but Joe Archer responded-even Dr. Ron Paul,who ended his interview with a sigh of resignation and a "I don't know what good this will do me." Maxine McCall Atlas took on the District 18 race for Barba ra Jordan's House seat, while Judith McClary looked at the At torney General race where both candidates in the Democratic primary are openly courting the women's vote. Kathleen Williamson researched the role of the county in Texas government for her story on the county judge race. Art editor Anita Davidson canvassed women lawyers on their views of judges—and why incumbents serve life terms-or so it seems. Attorney Jerry McAffee devised a quick civics course on the structure of the Harris County Courts. To explore grass roots politics, Emilie Farenthold researched the ACORN story for writer Gary Allison Morey. And Rice sociology professor, Chandler Davidson had an assignment he couldn't refuse-an interview with the Godmother of Texas liberals, Billie Carr. We all learned a lot about Texas politics and politicians. We hope you'll find some of it useful on May 6. *from the first readership survey September 19 77 to which 25% of our subscribers responded. BIPT*_f_B writers C8> stories Chandler Davidson 1 Nikki Van Hightower 2 Maxine McCall Atlas 3 Red Zenger 4 Barbara Karkabi 6 Judith McClary 8 Kathleen Williamson 10 Donna Adair 12 Gary Allison Morey 14 Anita Davidson 15 Carolyn Cosgriff 16 Cheryl Knott Kathleen Williamson 17 Pokey Anderson 18 Anita Davidson 20 Jerry McAfee 22 Marilyn Marshall Jones Brad Morris Barbara Karkabi 24 Deborah Diamond Hicks 28 Q: is this an important election year, Billie? A: Every year is an important election year Guest editorial: Clout The Barbara Jordan seat: Who deserves to win? Governor's race: Election time is compromise time Feminist vote split on U.S. Senate race Attorney General's race: Courting the women's vote County judge race: County autonomy Guess who's running for office? ACORN to City: Clean up your act! Artist Roberta Harris. "It's all about sharing . . ." Book review: Ballots and Bloomers Book Review: The Managerial Woman Book Review: Capitalist Patriarchy and the Case for Socialist Feminism Bye, bye, Clydes: "Hello Hooray" Bar rules on the bench County Courts The Congressional races Seminar planned: On Women and Change staff box Advertising Ailene English Art Charley Kubricht, Gary Allison Morey, Loretta Standard Business Jody Blazek, Deborah Diamond Hicks Circulation Maxine Atlas, Deborah Diamond Hicks, Nancy Landau, Sharman Petri Copy Editors Donna Adair, Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Deborah Diamond Hicks, Catherine Johns, Marilyn Marshall Jones, Marianne Warfield Kostakis, Gary Allison Morey, Brad Miller Editorial Board Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Marilyn Marshall Jones, Victoria Hodge Lightman, Kathleen Williamson Feature Editors Art-Anita Davidson; Books-Marianne Warfield Kostakis; Film-Victoria Hodge Lightman; Health-Dr. Marrie Richards; Pats & Pans-Gabrielle Cosgriff; Poetry -Joannie Whitebird Office Maxine Atlas, Janice Blue, Sharman Petri Photographers Janice Blue, Marilyn Marshall Jones, Nancy Landau, Brad Miller, Gary Allison Morey, Sharman Petri, Janice Rubin, Totsie, Jim Youngmeier Production Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Victoria Hodge Lightman, Marilyn Marshall Jones, Gary Allison Morey, Loretta Standard, Kathleen Williamson Proofreading Gabrielle Cosgriff, Marilyn Marshall Jones Typesetting Rachel Burke, Cheryl Knott, Victoria Hodge Lightman, Gary Allison Morey, Lynne Mutchler Second-class postage paid at Houston, Texas. Houston Breakthrough is published monthly (except for the bi-monthly issues of July-August and December- January) by the Breakthrough Publishing Company, 1708 Rosewood, Houston, TX 77004; P.O. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004; Tel. 713/526-6686. Subscriptions are $5 per year, newsstand 50 cents per copy. This publication is on file at the International Women's History Archive in the Special Collections Library, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 6020L . HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH APRIL 1978