Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Page 2
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 2. April 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/225.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1978). Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 2. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/225

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978 - Page 2, April 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/257/show/225.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough Special Election Issue, Vol. 3, No. 4, April 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_539ab.jpg
Transcript Houston Breakthrough Is this an important election year, Billie? There is no such thing as an unimportant election year. By Chandler Davidson Harris County Democrats, Houston's liberal organization, celebrated its 25th anniversary in March. Billie Carr, one of Texas' 11 Democratic National Committe members and a local institution in her own right, has been involved in the club 's activities almost from the start. There is something of the quintessential Irish pol in Billie, whose maiden name is McClain. Jovial, witty, up .to her ears in the details of precinct minutiae, she is also fully informed on the latest developments in state and national party affairs. The nickname her friends gave her the Godmother nicely suggests the blend of beneficence and clout that might result from a cross between the Cinderella fairy and il Padrone. In spite of her influence, Billie is not the boss of a machine. Houston has no patronage system. She got where she is today largely because of her personality, brains and indefatigability and of course the volunteer efforts of labor unionists, blacks, chicanos, middle-class activists and women of every background, who have constituted the core of the Harris County Democrats. Following the organization's candidate endorsement meetings in early April, Billie, who is on the screening committee, agreed to an interview with Chandler Davidson for Breakthrough, in which she discussed the upcoming primary elections and their special significance for women. Q: Is this an important election year, Billie? A: There's no such thing as an unimportant election year. Q: Why is this one in particular important? A: 1 must say that 1 have less enthusiasm for some of the statewide races than in times past. I think the No. 1 race in the state of Texas is the Bob Eckhardt Congressional race, even though it's not statewide. "As a progressive, as a woman, I think the re-election of Hckhardt is crucial, because he is the one Congressperson we can depend on to vote for the interests of the people, no matter how much pressure is applied from any special interest group. Q: Has he been especially good on women's issues? A: Yes. His top aide in his office is a woman. He's been very fair in employing women in top positions. He's the only Texan of the 24 in Congress, by the way, who voted against the neutron bomb. That's significant to me, as a person who's fought for peace and has been concerned about those sorts of issues. Q: What other races are important? A: Mickey Leland's race for Barbara Jordan's Congressional seat is important. Ron Waters' race for re-election to the legislature. Both men have a very good record so far as progressives and women are concerned. Bill Williams for county clerk. And certainly Anne Greene, who is running for chair of the Harris County Democratic Party. The incumbent, George Q. Buch, has gone on record against affirmative action rules in the selection of delegates to the presidential nominating con- I'm beginning to think that we liberals have got sort of complacent and lazy, and it's time we started taking some unpopular stands again, if we're going to continue our role as a conscience of a state or an era. vention in 1980. Anne is a very effective person, a lawyer and municipal judge with 1 2 years of experience in party politics.* Q: What about the governor's race? Harris County Democrats has given its support to John Hill. A while back you were not enthusiastic about Hill. Why have you decided to support him? A: Many people have been upset with me because I didn't jump on the John Hill bandwagon from the beginning. Anybody with any intelligence knows that we have a governor who is lacking in just that-in- telligence. And I am in no way a supporter of Dolph Briscoe's. However, 1 didn't want to pass Hill off as someone who was going to shake this state up. I've known Hill for, I guess, the 25 years I've been involved in politics, and 1 have watched him go from reactionary to conservative to moderate, and I think that's where he is today-a moderate. I don't want anybody to come to me when John Hill doesn't fight the battles that we as progressives expect to fight and say, "You passed him off as a progressive." 1 think he'll be better than Briscoe on education. (Almost anyone would.) I think he'll be better on consumer issues. He's already proven that. I think that his staff and the people he has working with him are top-notch people. 1 think he's come a long way on women's issues and has no problem with them. So lean support John Hill, and vote for him. And the same goes for Price Daniel, Jr., whom we endorsed for attorney general. Q: You say that Hill's come a long way on women's issues. What do you mean by that? A: Affirmative action. I think that he's followed that in his office as attorney general. Q: This is only the second time since 1962 in which the governor's race was not between a clearly-defined liberal and conservative. Some observers believe that the era of liberal-conservative politics is over in Texas—that we're entering another era in which different sorts of issues are more important. Do you agree? A: We're certainly entering an era where different issues are going to be important. One thing that I'm working with right now at both the national and state levels is to redefine the issues for those of us who have called ourselves liberals and now use the term progressive. At the national level, as the co-chair of the New Democratic Coalition, we have taken on the project of developing an agenda for America that's an alternative to Carter's programs-many parts of them-which we hope to present at the mid-term conference. In Texas, one of the reasons we don't have liberal candidates running in some of these races is that we need to work on developing issues. So we're trying to have some issues workshops, and I hope that after the primaries we can heat those up a littre. We're going to present an agenda for Texas at the September state convention -get it passed either through the platform or resolutions committee. Then we're going to ask some of our friendly state legislators and senators to introduce it as legislation in the next session of the legislature, so that we can start people thinking about what are the people-oriented issues. Q: Do you have some idea of what the issues will be? A: They've actually been voted on by a statewide meeting of liberals, fundamental human rights and immigration. Employment and welfare. Urban growth, planning. Recreation and parks. Health and aging. Women. Education. And several others. We're having these meetings all around the state between now and the September convention. Q: That leads to another question. In the past, the motive for attending Democratic precinct conventions on primary election day has been to participate in the struggle for control of the Texas party machinery—the State Democratic Executive Committee. And in presidential years, of course, the aim is also to help elect your kind of delegates to the national nominating convention. My question is, why take the trouble to attend precinct conventions this year? A: It's very important. In off-years, like this one, we don't caucus around presidential candidates, but around a petition. Anybody can get up and present a petition when it comes time to select delegates to the senatorial district convention. The liberal-progressives will present petitions to caucus around. The moderates and liberals control the SDEC currently, and we'd like to see it kept that way. The people that we beat in 1976 in order to control it—the conservatives who have pretty much controlled it the past 40 years- they don't like to see all these proportional-representation reform rules because it lets in the "riffraff." Everybody gets a piece of the action under the present system. So they have formed what they're calling the "mod- cons," the moderate conservatives, and I loved it when they announced that was going to be their name, because we started calling ourselves the mod-pros, the moderate progressives, and we thought it was pretty typical of what we stand for. They're the cons-against reform and against progress-we're for the Democratic party, and "for" things. The cons, we say, are really Republicans who try to trick you into believing they're Democrats. We've had some fun with that. So I urge people to go to their precinct conventions, get themselves elected to senatorial district conventions, and on to the September state convention. We have in my office information on how to be a delegate that's available to anyone who wants to drop by and pick it up. The reason that it's important to get elected a delegate is because under the reform rules, we have the senatorial districts electing a man and a woman each, who they want to represent them on the SDEC. Now that we have a broad-based SDEC I want you to know that they passed a motion, with only one vote out of 62 against, that a woman has a right to do what she will with her own body. And the one dissenting vote was from a liberal from San Antonio, a Catholic, who said, "I just couldn't go back and tell my priest (continued on page 31) APRIL 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH