Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, December 1976
Page 4
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, December 1976 - Page 4. December 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2540/show/2522.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, December 1976 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2540/show/2522

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, December 1976 - Page 4, December 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2540/show/2522.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, December 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date December 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_523d.jpg
Transcript Coming soon! another 'height report'. Meanwhile. Will women wear 'the badge that cares'? By Wade Roberts The badge that means you care doesn't necessarily care about you —especially if you are a woman. The Houston Police Department's new minority recruiting campaign —couples with agility and height requirements —virtually eliminates women, of any race, from police cadet classes. Th^ newest cadet class provides an illustrative example: of the class's 75 cadets, 36 are white and 39 are minority. Police Chief B.G. "Pappy" Bond has made considerable hubbub over the racial breakdown, citing it as proof that the department has made a concerted effort to end the days of the white-dominated police force in Houston. Those recruiting efforts, however, fall somewhere short of successful when one considers that the 75-person class numbers only three women among the potential officers. The problem is two-fold: the new, slick recruiting campaign does not include women among the groups the department is trying to attract; and, once attracted, most women re eliminated by physical requirements for entering the police academy. The two police officers in charge of recruiting, Capt. L.L. Wunsche and Sgt. E.R. Williams, deny that the recruiting campaign excludes women. "That's just not the intent of the program at all," said Williams. "The camaign is geared to minorities —and that certainly includes women." "I'd like to think that it is directed toward women," said Wunsche. "The recruiting program was designed specifically to attract minorities —but we didn't exclude women." But city women's advocate Nikki Van Hightower thinks differently. "The recruiting program now is directed exclusively toward black males," Van Hightower said. "It just hasn't touched upon women. "They just aren't interested in women," she continues. Van Hightower said she's glad to see the department doing something to attract minority members to careers as law enforcement officers. She's not, however, completely satisfied by the department's efforts. "The police department has a real race problem —and minorities have been discriminated against in the past," Van Hightower said, "I guess the only way to reverse that is to launch a heavy recruiting campaign designed to attract the minorities. "But women have been discriminated against, too," Van Hightower maintains, "and they deserve a chance." Ed Norton, an advertising agent who handles the police department's recruiting campaign, verifies Van Hightower's assessment of the campaign's thrust. In a conversatin with Breakthrough, Norton said "Sweetie, I don't want to argue with you. You can't change the thrust of this campaign because it's aimed at Blacks." Although Norton's agency, Goodwin, Dannenbaum, Litt- man and Wingfield, is advertising heavily in minority pub- ani/fi Housing Discri initiation Is Illegal lications, Norton refused even to consider buying advertising space in Breakthrough in an attempt to reach women. "You can butt your head against the wall as much as you want," he told Breakthrough, "but I'm telling you that the campaign is programmed for Blacks." Van Hightower said, while she finds the advertising campaign offensive, she would rather concentrate her efforts on changing the department's physical requirements. "There's no point in bringing women down and recruiting them when the requirements are so tough that almost all women are automatically excluded," Van Hightower said. "There's no point in making a fuss over the recruiting campaign alone," she said. Wunsche and Williams agree with Van Hightower that most women applicants find it impossible to pass the agility and height requirements. "If applicants can pass all the requirements, then we let them in, regardless of their sex or race," Williams said. "And we have quite a few women applicants coming in who just don't meet the physical requirements —because they were written for men," he admitted. Williams said the tests are designed to gauge upper-torso strength —which most men, but not women, naturally possess. He also said the tests are not a true measure of agility and that an agility test could be written „ so women would pass and men would fail. While the recruiting program fails to encourage women to apply for admission to the department, the physical requirements are what actively exclude women. A total of 2,253 persons applied for the current cadet class, and 77 were accepted, said Wunsche. Or the 1,301 white maJes who applied, 36 were admitted. Of the 709 Black ICall: 222-5411 City of Houston Fair Housing Divisionj Jjcj^x /^jrcmr-x U^a^pA/^ New HPD Cadet Class males, 21 were admitted. Of the 241 Mexican-American males, 15 were admitted. Of the 120 Black women, three were admitted. Of the 85 White women and seven Mexican-American women, none were admitted. Wunsche agrees that the low admission rate of women applicants is because of the strict physical requirements. "I'm personally disappointed that we have not recruited and hired more women," Wunsche said, "but we certainly aren't going to improve on the record as long as the physical requirements remain as strict as they are " Those standards, Wunsche said, may change soon. He said the department has hired a consulting firm to study all of the department's admission standards. The firm will issue a report later this month, he said, that may recommend changes in re quirements found to be not job- related. Mayor F red Hofheinz, during a press conference held after opening ceremonies* for the new cadet class last month, hinted that change of the physical standards may very well follow the report's release Just in case, however, d Houston chapter of NOW has filed a federal suit challenging the constitutionality of the physical standards. If the department is not quick to change them, the matter could be decided in court. "I think they have a very valid case," Van Hightower said, "and a good chance of winning it unless the requirements are changed following the consulting report "Then, after that's out of the way," she continued, "we can do something about that offensive ad campaign." proudly presents two new albums fiefie'RJfeche dnncenble latin, j;i//, tliythm and bluer; WHERE WOULD 1 BE WITHOUT YOU an album of poetry by Pal Parker and Judy Grahn and distributing two new albums Casse Culver: Three Gypsies Berkeley Women's Music Collective Also available: Me<j Christian: I Know You Know Cri:; Williamson. I he Chnnqer and Hie Ghan(|ed Kay Gardner: Mooncircles Albums available al Caclus Records, I Ik; Pookslore. and the Record \UhM Or contact Olivia distributor Pokey Anderson. 52G 7HM. Also available by mail ($'» SO plus .55 mailinu each) from Olivia Ho<:owlr;, Dept PIP , P0 Pox 70237, l.os Anqele-; OA ')()()/() HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH - DECEMBER 1976 PAGE 3 ?-»?<-;?, in . 1 \ i ' = , t %