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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, December 1976
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, December 1976 - Page 3. December 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2540/show/2521.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, December 1976 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2540/show/2521

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, December 1976 - Page 3, December 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2540/show/2521.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, December 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date December 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_523c.jpg
Transcript w m snAscH Smut is smut, but... Smut is rampart in Houston. The range, degree and availability of degenerate materials and performances here rival that of New York's Times Square and Baltimore's The Block There is no doubt that pornography exploits women "Our bodies are being stripped, exposed and contorted,'' Susan Brownmiller has written, 'for the purpose of ridicule to bolster that 'masculine esteem' which gets its kick and sense of power from viewing females as anonymous playthings, adult toys, dehumanized objects to be used, abused and discarded. "Pornography is the undiluted essence of anti-female propaganda," she wrote in Against Our Will. But the pornographer is an unwitting propagandist. His or her aim is not to promote perversion but to exploit it. Sales of the junk are symptoms of a sickness in our society but not the cause of it. Unlike offensive political propaganda, smut would vanish overnight if people didn't buy it. The moves here and across the nation against pornography are both encouraging and frightening. Condemnation of filth demonstrates we are disgusted and tired of the attitudes which support it. But the path toward legally restricting pornography is laden with pitfalls which could destory our freedom —and still not change the attitudes. There is a difference between being assaulted by pornography and having it available. Few will deny a community's right to legally restrict billboards, window displays and children's access to pornography Unfortunately, Geneva Kirk Brooks and her small, militant band of Citizens Against Pornography (CAP) have already sought more. Their efforts before City Council smack of McCarthyism and witch (or warlock) hunts. They want dossiers on professors. They claim some schoolbooks are obscene. They say they want to ban smut, but will they stop before they get to James Joyce and Shere Hite? "Drawing the line" will inevitably offend the artistic sensibilities of some and have a chilling effect on all forms of expression. Censorship is the preditor of every original idea Besides, censorship won't work. The pristine newsstands and theatres of Franco's Spain did not change degrading attitudes and behavior toward women. And censorship would divert overtaxed law enforcement and judicial resources from serious crime—like rape. Breakthrough has consistently criticized obnoxious, sexist material —and will continue to do so. But we have not asked that the government smash presses —and we never will. Much can be done without changing the law. Pressure groups have changed attitudes about violence and racism. Houston newsstands have become more discriminating in displaying sexual literature in the wake of CAP's protests. Anti-pornography crusaders, learn to play by the rules, do not try to change them. Write angry letters, complain to merchants, walk picket lines. These are your consitutional rights. But beware that freedom-loving Houstonians will fight to the end your efforts to "protect" us with the force of law from words and pictures, r or censorship is the ultimate obscenity. Breakthrough Houston £a Where Women Are News STAFF - THIS ISSUE Art— Charley Kubricht-Fore, Elizabeth Holtzman, Prairie Jackson, Gertrude Barnstone, Mark Stinson Advertising— Gertrude Barnstone, Barbara Brown, Ailene English, Ann Harris, Mary-k Wilson Circulation— Elliot Clem, Nancy Kern, Cathy Snygg, Olga Soliz Production— Karen Barrett, Janice Blue, John Carter, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Barbara Hugetz, Wade Roberts Editors-Writers— Sam E.J. Akers, Karen Barrett, Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Barbara Hugetz Wade Roberts Office— Janice Blue, Barbara Hugetz, Glenda Sherry Photography— Amos Barrow, Doug Cox, Nancy Landau, Marilyn Mock Typesetting— Barbara Hugetz, Mary-k Wilson EDITORIAL BOARD Gertrude Barnstone, Janice Blue Gabrielle Cosgriff, Barbara Hugetz Vol. 1, No. 10, December 1976. Houston Breakthrough is publisheo monthly (with the exception of the June-July and the August- September issues) by the Breakthrough Publishing Company, 1708 Rosewood, Houston, Texas 77004, P.O. Box 88072, Houston, Texas 77004. Telephone (713) 526-6686. Subscriptions $5.00 a year. Newsstand 50 cents per copy. This publication is on file at the International Women's History Archive in the Special Collections Library, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60201. JHOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH - DECEMBER 1976 PAGE 2 ^50^R>y HOMEY... rOO^L-TOO ^0RT TO BE i\ Cop; letters to breakthrough I just received your November issue, and want to say thank you for your editorial on Karen Silkwood. Karen died two years ago while trying to get her important health and safety message to the public through the media It is a beautiful tribute to Silkwood for Breakthrough to continue to carry on with that message The role played by the media will, I'm sure, be critical to learning the truth about the Silkwood case. Again, thank you for your part in the public educational effort. For peace, equality and justice. DONNA WARNOCK National Coordinator Supporters of Silkwood Washington, DC. Editor's note: Readers wanting more information on the Silkwood case may write to S.O.S., III! Florida Ave. N.W., Washington, DC. 2(XH)8. As a grandmother I am totally pro-feminist. I lived the experience of earning a living for myself and my child in the great Depression My ex-husband did not contribute any financial help. I had no money to obtain a lawyer and secure that aid granted by law. Equal rights? I was aware that men doing the same work I was doing received double the income I was paid . . . We all know, as women and mothers, what is expected of us. In or out of wedlock, we are the ones responsible for 'our' offspring. They are the woman's problem. She is solely accountable. Men can ignore and escape all responsibility and still be considered moral, good men It appears men are accepted as being in some never- never land, uncounted and unaccountable. Now, the government and politicians are using the abortion issue like a football game. The church is involved in the pro and con of this issue The presidential election had two men who refused to come out for abortion When will the ones who are really involved be considered in this question? Again, as in ages past, it appears women are not included in such important decisions. Are we losers again? j.LAMONT Palacios, TX I was very happy going to Dr. (name withheld). I didn't have to wait long and he helped me feel good about myself. But recently my husband and I talked to him about the birth of our first child . . When we said we were thinking about home birth, he became very defensive and said, "I am against it and I will not deliver at home!'' Two weeks later, we received a letter refusing his services to us saying "I feel that it will be impossible to establish a close patient-doctor relationship with you and your husband." He gave me 10 days to find another physician. Therefore, I am 4-months pregnant and must find another doctor, as his letter was very final in its refusal. [Name Withheld] Editor's note: Midwife Martha Frosh says, "This is a typical, reoccur ring problem." Frosh is with HOME, Houston Organization for Midwife Education and says her group knows of only one doctor in the city who will give both pre-natal care and medical back-up in home birth deliveries. Judy Kier of AC AH, Association for Childbirth at Home, concurs with Frosh's findings. If you [or our readers] wish to contact either group about home births, you may call HOME [668-9934] or ACAH [661-9994]. I saw Jo Anne Gerfciardt's interesting article on women at the Alamo. Professor Rose Marie Cutting and I are working on a book on Texas women from a variety of perspectives. (We are) curious if the essay (in the November Breakthrough) is a part of a larger research effort . . If so, we would like to include it in our edited book on Texas women. Should you know of others involved in research on Texas women, I would appreciate knowing of them and their research interests. BONNIE COOK FREEMAN UT-Austin,TX Editor's note: Yes, Gerhardts article is part of a larger research effort. Any other reader involved in research on Texas women may write Dr. Freeman at the College of Education, Education Bldg. 528 UT-Austin, Austin, Tx. 78712. Or Professor Rose Marie Cutting, Dept. of English, Calhoun 15, UT-Austin, Austin, Tx. 78712.