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Broadside, Vol. 9, No. 3, March 1978
Page 5
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Broadside, Vol. 9, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 5. March 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2393/show/2389.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1978). Broadside, Vol. 9, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2393/show/2389

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside, Vol. 9, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 5, March 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2393/show/2389.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Broadside, Vol. 9, No. 3, March 1978
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date March 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1439 .H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 5
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File Name femin_201109_029e.jpg
Transcript Holroyd and Annette M. Brodsky and reported in the October 1977 AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGIST. They found that 80 percent of the respondents who said they had intercourse said they had done so with more than one patient. Also, respondents claimed the number of times they had intercourse ranged from one to 200, with an average of 29 times. "Erotic contact and intercourse are almost always between male therapists and female clients," noted Holroyd and Brodsky. Their study was designed to elicit psychotherapists' beliefs about the benefits of physical contact with clients as well as frequencies of both erotic and nonerotic contacts. Behavior modification and rational-cognitive therapists are more likely to engage in erotic kissing and holding and to a greater extent than practitioners in other schools of psychology, the survey revealed. Nonerotic contact—which includes friendly hugginq, kissing, and affectionate touching-- was practiced occasionally by 27 percent of the psychologists, and frequently or always by 7 percent. Those respondents who thought erotic contact might be beneficial cited various reasons, including patients' feelings of inferiority, severe doubts of sexual identity, and ignorance of the mechanics of sexual intercourse. The vast majority of comments were against sexual contact. One psychologist wrote: ". . . it is unethical at best and devastating at worst—it reflects pathological needs on the part of the therapist." Whether the incidence of erotic contact and intercourse among psychologists and their patients "should be considered frighteningly high or comfortingly low depends on one's interpretation of harm done by such practices," comment Holroyd and Brodsky. Previously, reviews of case histories involving such contact indicate the negative effects, for both the patient and the therapist, outweigh the positive. Feminist psychologists and an American Psychological Association Task Force on Sex Bias and Sex Role Stereotyping have voiced concern that erotic contact with patients is based on the therapists' needs for power or sexual gratification. The A.P.A. has formally decreed that "Sexual intimacies are unethical. . . . Psychologists (must) avoid exploiting their (the clients') trust and dependency." On a similar note, Holroyd and Brodsky have surveyed psychiatrists and found the sex-with-patient rate is roughly equivalent to that among psychologists. In addition, they surveyed male physicians in 1973 in the Los Angeles area and determined that rates of sexual intercourse with patients are even higher for surgeons, obstetrician-gynecologists, and general practitioners. Y.B.