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NOW News Bay Area Chapter,Vol. 12, No. 7, July 1984
Page 2
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter,Vol. 12, No. 7, July 1984 - Page 2. July 1984. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 3, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2354/show/2342.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1984). NOW News Bay Area Chapter,Vol. 12, No. 7, July 1984 - Page 2. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2354/show/2342

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter,Vol. 12, No. 7, July 1984 - Page 2, July 1984, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 3, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2354/show/2342.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter,Vol. 12, No. 7, July 1984
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date July 1984
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 2
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File Name femin_201109_278b.jpg
Transcript DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: The following is from USA TODAY, Dec. 12, 1983. I urge each and every one of you who reads this article to attend the meeting this Thursday, July We are our sisters, keepers! 5, you 1984, Look closely at her. The clues are there. She can't quite conceal the chin and cheek discoloration with makeup. She often makes those unexpected, unexplained visits to the hospital emergency room. And there are the tearful, contrived phone calls canceling longplanned get-togethers. The evidence points clearly and tragically to a battered wife. She is one of six million American women trapped by domestic violence. Authorities predict that more than 2,000 of them will die from such beatings next year. Wife battering, by no means a new phenomenon, is a growing societal problem. For too long, household violence has been winked at by the law. Police, prosecutors and judges, mostly men. usually consider such cases" "family spats." They say tnere are more important crimes that must be dealt with. Those woman who are dependent on spouses for subsistence too often have taken the punishment in silence. Outside their homes, they have no place to hide. They want desperately to hold their families together. They have no confidence that courts will protect them. But society must find answers. The law enforcement establishment must be more responsive. This crime must be taken seriously-oy police, prosecutors and judges* In every community there must be a heightened sensitivity to the plight of battered women. Presently there are 700 shelters across the USA where they can hide and receive counseling. But many cities have none. The YWCA has more than 200 shelters- but the agency reports it is unable to accommodate 80% of the battered women who need help. More than a dozen states now fund programs to aid battered wives. But most state legislatures have failed even to acknowledge the problem. Many victims of the crime of wife battering report they feel disgraced by the experience. The disgrace is not theirs. It belongs to the society that fails to protect and help tnem. There are 695 shelter beds available in Texas at any one time. At least 2/3rds of these beds must be used by the children that accompany the mother, which means about 232 families can be sheltered at any one time. According to a 1983 survey of Texas women, at least 60,000 women are physically abused each week, which means there are 260 women in need for each shelter bed available in Texas. Eacn year in Texas, at least 318,000 women are physically abused by their husband or live-in partner. "Texas Council on Family Violence, July, 1983" In every neighborhood, among families of every social and economic class, an alarming number of women are beaten by their mates-frequently, savagely, and for prolonged periods of time-yet they are virtually powerless to act in their own defense. Almost invariably, they cannot run away because they lack the means to support themselves and their children. Instead, they are made to feel somehow responsible for what they have suffered, and hence can expect little help from the police, the courts, and social agencies. -Del Martin, Battered Wives (Glide Publications), 1976