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Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973
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Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973 - Page 7. July 1973. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2340/show/2338.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1973). Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2340/show/2338

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973 - Page 7, July 1973, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2340/show/2338.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date July 1973
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1439 .H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 7
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File Name femin_201109_075g.jpg
Transcript July 1973 BROADSIDE EVOLUTIONARY NOTES Page BOYCOTT OF SAFEWAY OF DIFFICULT BIRTHS AND THE SPIRIT OF WOMEN By Pippin Samuel Beckett characterized the times in which we now live with a bit of fictional Trusth that far exceeds the descriptive properties of factual expression when he wrote that "We are between a death and a difficult birth." It appears that we are now caught up in a whirlwind of unprecendented societal change. Words such as fragmented, schizoid, and paranoid have become common-place adjectives for characterizing the American conscience. Most of the orienting absolutes of past generations have either been refuted by a host of "new consciousnesses" or have been redefined so many times that they have become lost in a meaningless obii vi on . I believe the meaningless- ness of modern human existence can be attributed in a large degree to the rise of Rationalism. Since the Enlightenment, society has sought to define humanness by placing it/us on the Procrustean bed of intel- lectualism as defined by the Scientific Method. By the way of this process we have been cut off from our roots and set adrift into a vacuous sea of sterility. What we have forgotten is that the really meaningful times for us are rarely brought about by the logical precision of intellectual reasoning. Those times arise more from a feeling or intuitive level of experience. The Gods have never been rational and neither have we. We have only made it seem that way because We have had a philosophy that, due to our own insecurity and .lack of broadness of vision, , has made it so. Humankind is much more than the cold reasonings of a statistical profile would lead us to believe. Eash of us has a spirit which cannot be viewed under a microscope or found by a surgeon's knife; it exists nevertheless, and'is of great importance. Its voice supercedes all questions of relevance and speaks to the essence of our being. The few of you that have read this far are no doubt wondering what this bit of philosophical babbling has to do with the liberation of women. Alot--if you are cognizant of the fact that women are generally more in touch with themselves (which is to say that they are more aware of the level of human essence that I have been talking about) than men. It is unfortunate that it is for this reason that women have been oppressed and barred from many professions. This is not only a crime against women, it is possibly a greater crime against society as a whole. If we as a nation had been in touch with our inntermost sensitivities rather than our cool levels of rationalism, would we have stayed in Vietnam as long as we did? If we as a people would permit ourselves a little more liberty with that unscientific, irrational capacity known as love, would we permit people to starve to death in America? The crux of what I am saying is that in the fight for equality with men, women must continually be aware that they need not play by men's rules; for, unfortunately, that would often mean sacrificing what we need most these days--the abilities to feel compassion and live in addition to a capacity for intellectual reasoning. What I am saying was put beautifully by William Faulkner What I am saying was put beauti fully by Wi11iam Faulkner. Due to the sexism which pervades even our language, I have taken the liberty of replacing the words "man" and "he" with'we'. A number of NOW members have organized to picket the ■Safeway store at Weslayan and Westheimer in support of the United Farm Workers. Each Thursday, a group wearing signs saying "Don't shop Safeway" and distributing leaflets, picket the store from 7-9 p.m. asking people to shop elsewhere. By reducing Safeway's sal sales, the UFW hopes to convince management that the people are opposed to the store's attitude toward farm workers and will continue to boycott the stores until Safeway supports the workers' right to unionize for a living wage. Basically, the point of contention is that Safeway deals exclusively with growers (many of whom are on the Safeway Board of Directors) who refuse to allow the people who work in the" fields to select their own union. Instead, the growers have signed "sweetheart" contracts with the Teamster's Union. The Teamsters do not represent the farm workers. No elections were held and in some areas, workers are forbidden to attend union meetings. But, by signing contracts with the Teamsters, the growers are attempting to convince the public that this is a jurisdictional dispute between two unions and the public should not get involved. This is definitely not so. Both Safeway and ASP were selected as boycott targets since they are the largest chains. If they begin dealing with UFW, the other stores will follow suit. NOW has had some success in their first two picketing attempts. In a total of four hours, wer turned away 52 cars. Organizaers from Dallas report that sales are down dramatically in that city due to the boycott. If you are interested in supporting the farm workers and can give two hours of your time every two weeks, call Linda Feahr at 644-4861