Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough, January 1980
Page 29
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 29. January 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2144.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1980). Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 29. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2144

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 29, January 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2144.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, January 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date January 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 29
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_556bb.jpg
Transcript MUSIC music could start a cult. people who pretend to be Indians and camp out in tee-pees, a woman from Southampton who has built a shrine to Jim Reeves and apparently prays to him, and of course an army of Presley- ites prepared to mourn forever more— he never came to England. I think they'd settle for his body, though. Now, why would a country that's not really so bad off (don't believe everything you read) fawn so shamelessly over another country's culture, especially when its own culture is so rich? Okay, Americans are a bit that way about Shakespeare and so on, but mostly because they feel obliged, because they learned about this stuff in school, and because, anyway, Shakespeare, being pre-1776, is as much a part of American culture as British. But what American knows anything about British traditional music, for example? For that matter, hardly any British know anything about it. There are a couple of societies that try to save it from extinction, and clubs here and there where the few traditional musicians who remain will perform for expenses and beer (I'm discounting the "folk" movement, which includes some festivals and the occasional good rock group like Steeleye Span, because that's just the hippies again), but I'll bet they're outnumbered by the Elvis Presley clones alone. When I've broached the subject here, the answer I usually get is that American music is just so much more alive. All right, but why? The first explanation, the easy one, is that the British class system killed the native popular music by not allowing it on the radio. When you mention class here, it's no Marxist abstraction (and anyway, don't forget where Marx lived while he was refining his world view;) the system has concrete effects. All during the twenties, thirties and forties, and even into the fifties, when radio was proliferating in the US, there were only two stations in all of Britain, both of them run by a Government corporation, the BBC, which was run by upper-middle-class bureaucrats who thought popular music was vulgar, as, by definition, it is ("vulgarity" only has a bad name because of the way the middle classes sneered when they said it). So they wouldn't broadcast it, British, American or any other kind. The most "popular" music on the radio was a Paul Whiteman imitator named Ted Heath, who had managed to find taints of Storeyville even in the aptly- named Whiteman's music and had refined them out. While in the States radio was fusing dozens of regional styles into broad popular sounds—Nashville, blues, bee-bop, Tin Pan Alley, swing, rhythm and blues, rock and roll—British traditional music, including its once-thriving Music Hall, was still in the boondocks, still depending on live audiences, most of whom weren't there any more because they were at American movies or listening to American records or tapping their toes to Ted Heath. A remaindered shipment of, say, San Antonio doo-wah music could easily start a cult, and a hard, expensive object like a phonograph record, if it's your only source of the sound, doesn't go out of fashion as easily as the momentary whims of a disc jockey. American popular music was rare and cherished and passed from hand to hand, a bit like modern literature in Moscow today—indeed, like popular music in Moscow today. (I might add that when the BBC put on two popular channels and began setting up local radio stations, one of the first results was the Beatles.) Another explanation, and this one's harder, is the national passion, common to all classes, for collecting things. Maybe this derives from their long history as a trading nation—who knows?—or because their mothers don't pay very much attention, or all of the above and more, but everybody I meet seems to be some kind of magpie—collecting everything from stamps, coins and matchboxes to steam engines, beer labels and the numerals on passing airplanes. Frazer, Darwin, Burton, Leakey—they could only have been British. But there is also a typically British disdain for the people who produce or otherwise live with the things that the British collect. A musicologist I know, who specializes in Deep South music, can't stand the States. He only goes there when he has to, because he finds the place culturally barren. By this he means that most Americans don't know what they've got. They sit around in their bars and honky-tonks getting on with drinking their lives away and being quite grateful that somebody's playing some music, but they don't even know that this is Deaf Boy Blue who was born in Yazoo, Mississippi, and used to play with Two-Toe Jackson when Jackson was still on one-string washtub, and in 1925 they cut three records on such-and- such a label, and do you want to know the serial numbers? The attitude can be irritating, but you'll have to admit that it's useful. It means that the rest of us can go on living and creating and neglecting, and there'll always be some Englishman to pick up what we've thrown away and put it where it won't get lost, broken or rained on, saving it as surely as the Karyatids were saved when they were stolen from the Parthenon. The British are always wondering if they have a role in the world any more. I think that they do and that it's the same as it always was: the British Museum. VIWMM Lynne Mutchler, editor Harris County Women's Political Caucus will sponsor a fundraiser for Congressman Mickey Leland on Saturday, January 19 at 8 p.m., at 1415 Indiana. Fund-raiser for Anne Wheeler, January 26, 7-11 p.m. $5 donation, cash bar. 306 Terrace. Houston: A Women's History is a series of free lectures exploring the contribution of Black, Anglo and Hispanic women to Houston's history, politics, business, and the changing status of women. The Learning Library Program of the Houston Public Library is presenting these lectures twice: at 2:30 p.m. on Sundays (January 20 to March 23) at the Jungman Branch, 5830 Westheimer; and at 7 p.m. on Thursdays (January 24 to March 27) at the Central Library, 500 McKinney. The first topics are: A Woman's Place in Houston, Carol Brown, HCC; The Women's Suffrage Movement: Its Birth in Houston, John Eudy, NHCC; Women in Houston Politics: 1950 to the Present, Eleanor Tinsley, Houston City Council; Black Women in Houston Politics, Marcelia Washington, HCC; The Changing Legal Status of Houston's Black Women, Myrtle McKenzie, Attorney; and Mexican American Women in Houston Politics, Olga Soliz, Business Consultant. For further information and the complete schedule, call 222-3268. Volunteers to work with residents of the shelter for abused women maintained by the Houston Area Women's Center will be trained on four consecutive Saturdays beginning January 5, 1980. Training will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and will include: an understanding of family violence, crisis intervention training, information on community resources and procedures at the shelter. For more information call the Houston Area Women's Center at 792-4403. Reel Women is a 10-week series of films offering an intensive opportunity to explore how films have perpetuated myths and stereotypes and reinforced beliefs of the proper "place" of women. The films will be shown free Saturday afternoons at 2 p.m. beginning January 12 in the auditorium of the Houston Public Library's Julia Ideson Building at 500 McKinney. Chronicling almost 50 years of social history, the films were chosen by Eric Gerber, film critic of the Houston Post, and Dr. Antoinette Boecker of TSU. Each film dramatically depicts a specific era in the changing role of American women and significantly reflected and influenced the values and beliefs of its first-release audience. January 12 Stella Dallas 1937 Barbara Stanwyck January 19 Mildred Pierce 1945 Joan Crawford January 26 Shanghai Express 1932 Marlene Dietrich February 2 Klute 1971 Jane Fonda February 9 His Girl Friday 1940 Rosalind Russell February 16 Some Like It Hot 1959 Marilyn Monroe February 23 A Woman Under the Influence 1974 Gena Rowlands March 1 Rachel, Rachel 1968 Joanne Woodward March 8 Looking for Mr. Goodbar 1977 Diane Keaton March 15 Girlfriends 1978 Melanie Mayron fWhat state elected the first woman governor in the United States W and inaugurated the nations's only all-woman Supreme Court—all f^m within the same year? ^r Texas, of course. ^ The year was 1925 when Miriam "Ma" Ferguson was sworn in as Texas' and the nation's first female governor. "Most Texans know about Ma Ferguson, but few have ever heard about the All Woman Supreme Court, appointed only 5 years after women won the right to vote," says Travis County Commissioner Ann Richards. Hortense Ward was appointed Chief Justice, Ruth Brazil and Hattie L. Henenburg were appointed associate Justices by the previous governor, Pat M. Neff. The women were appointed to hear a case involving Woodmen of the World, a fraternal organization whose members included all the male members of the Court as well as most of the male attorneys of the state, who might be charged with a conflict of interest in the case. These little-known facts of Texas history are being uncovered by the Texas Women's History project of the Texas Foundation for Women's Resources, an non-profit organization. The material is being gathered for a major exhibit about Texas women—and the role they had in shaping the state's history. The exhibit is tentatively scheduled to open at the Institute of Texas Cultures in San Antonio in 1981. A film, a traveling exhibit and several publications are also being planned. "We have had calls from all parts of Texas, with offers of information, materials and assistance to the project," sais Mary Beth Rogers, project director. More that 4,000 museums, historical organizations, libraries, universities and private individuals have been surveyed to identify artifacts, photographs, documents and other material to include in the exhibit. The project will soon publish a Guide to Sources on Women's History in Texas, compiled from the unprecedented survey of historical sources made for this project. Initial funding for the project has been provided by the Texas Committee for the Hu- HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 29 DECEMBER/JANUARY 1980