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Houston Breakthrough, January 1980
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Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 17. January 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 10, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2132.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1980). Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 17. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2132

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 17, January 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 10, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2132.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, January 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date January 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 17
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File Name femin_201109_556ap.jpg
Transcript rime called it "a year to be well rid of." The Encyclopedia Bri- tannica's Yearbook titled its story "1970: A Year of Violence." All around the world, people lashed out at other people; thousands of Americans died in Vietnam; a federal judge in California was taken from his courtroom by black militants and killed in a convict escape attempt; a Manhattan townhouse thought to be a bomb factory of the Weathermen blew up; Nixon and Kissinger decided to invade Cambodia; National Guardsmen killed four student at Kent State University; police fired int a crowd at Jackson State and killed two more students; Arab commandoes hijacked airliners and killed people in airports; Cambodians massacred Vietnamese civilians; and decimated Bia- frans capitulated to Nigerian government forces after a million died in 30 months of their battle for independence. The violence was daily, it was everywhere. Hell's Angels finished off the Woodstock euphoria when they killed a black man 20 feet from Mick Jagger, who was singing Sympathy for the Devil. Jan is Joplin and Jimi Hendrix died of drug overdoses, and writer Yukio Mishima committed ritual suicide to protest Japan's "spinelessness." United Mine Workers official Joseph Yablonski, his wife and daughter were found murdered in their home and Tony Boyle, head of the union and Yablonski's opponent for its presidency, was later convicted of the killing. Murder charges were made against two U.S. soldiers in connection with a massacre at My Lai, South Vietnam, and five marines were charged with murdering 16 South Vietnamese women and children while on patrol south of Da Nang. Whites in Lamar, South Carolina, attacked and overturned two buses carrying black children to desegregated schools. Charles Manson went on trial for the murders of Sharon Tate Polanski and several other people. A Bolivian artist nearly stabbed Pope Paul VI in the Philippines. Neither was the earth itself peaceful. In Pakistan, a cyclone and tidal wave killed 200,000 people and destroyed 500,000 homes. Floods in central Rumania killed at least 130. Seventy-two people died in a mountain mudslide near Saint-Gervaise, France, and giant avalanches in France and the Swiss Alps buried 69 people. A massive earthquake struck the mountains of Peru. Rivers reached record flood levels in Yugoslavia, Rumania and Hungary. The largest brush A year that roared with hatred and violence, but went out like a lamb BY DAVID CROSSLEY fire in California history raged near the Mexican border. Hurricane Celia smashed into the coast at Corpus Christi, killing 31 people. No continent was without mayhem. The Irish fought each mother with guns, bombs, sticks, and stones. Throughout South America, coups toppled one leader after another. Portugal invaded Guinea. Poles rioted over food prices for a week. Basque guerrillas killed and were killed. The Middle East was the site of sporadic, general, undeclared war: Israel was attacked from Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, and the United Arab Republic (Egypt), and responded in kind. 4 II trace of civility vanished, especially in the United States, where students and other protestors referred to police and politicians as "pigs" and the President, Richard Nixon, called students "thugs and hoodlums." Vice President Spiro Agnew continued his effort to ignite civil war, railing weekly against students, leftists, intellectuals, teachers, the media, and all the great unwashed outside the imagined "Silent Majority." When he gave a speech in Houston, demonstrators chanted "Lee Harvey Oswald, where are you now that we need you?" It was the war in Vietnam that did it, that drove the world mad, and it was in 1970 that complete societal disintegration in the U.S. seemed imminent. In May of that year, the Brandeis University student strike center reported that 448 American universities and colleges were closed or on strike. But as the police and national guard became more and more violent, the student "unrest," as it was called, began to quiet, and by the end of the decade, the universities were calm. Never again did students against the war rally in significant numbers, although Vietnam went on until 1975. During 1970 the American split over a single issue was fractured into many issues and the age of "special interest groups" was born, soon to collapse in the final refuge of the Me Decade, which continues unabated as we begin the 1980s. In exactly 10 years we have come from a tumultuous time when war and blood were the central issues and thousands were impassioned enough to kill or be killed, to a time when oil and money are the central issues and American dissent is just a murmur. What happened to us in 1970? The Encyclopedia Britannica said, "In 1970 President Nixon managed to neutralize the war in Vietnam as a political issue." How? Was it the guns and bombs, the Nixon-Kissinger "toughness" and willingness to wreak any destruction on anybody anywhere to prove that toughness? Was it the absurdity of the same Nixon sneaking out of the White House in the middle of the night to go talk about football to camping protestors at the Washington Monument? Or was it the final split within the peace movement, when women finally wanted to be with women, and men with men, and blacks with blacks, and Chicanos with Chicanos, ultimately to find fault with each other? Was it the seeming collapse of the environment that in those pre-OPEC days was viewed as the number one calamity by nearly everyone, from the first Earth Day revelers to Henry Ford to Richard Nixon? And how has it come to pass that nearly all special interest groups are now willing to trade just about any ecological disaster for a few pages of legislation favoring their own cause, as though the environment was some "special interest" and not the concern of everyone on the planet? Or was humanity frightened by the pictures from space of the cold blue earth with no sign whatsoever of the long millenia of human activity? Were Quaaludes increasingly required because at last we could see that the earth was too small, too fragile to be saved? How did we feel, the millions of us who learned for the first time that, regardless of our care, the earth was doomed to be swallowed up by the fire of the sun as it becomes a red giant in half a billion years, taking humanity with it? How hopeful can we be, now that we know even the earth must die, and for that matter the sun and the solar system and all of the universe? Is it because of this realization that so many in the last 10 years turned to seemingly mysterious eastern philosophies, looking for immortality, some trick that will take us through the blackest hole of all, the end of our universe and the creation of some new universe on the other side? Do we turn our attention to our souls and to their journey through time? And is the question of morality that always has surrounded the soul vanishing? We have always assumed that activity such as that we're watching in Iran will only earn the players a place in some special eternal hell; but now that they think we are doomed to that same hell— and we cannot see why they think so—do we soon have to reject forever as too confusing the very notion of hell? Or, as some suggest, should we reject forever the notion of souls and self and get used to the idea that we are nothing special, just part of the vast chemistry of time and space—with a function, to be sure, however minute—doomed to proceed antlike to our end? I don't think so. By 1970, we had learned about one important thing: consciousness. It has become a trite word, a buzz word, but it's meaning continues to hold truth. For all of our simple chemical connection to the rest of the universe and to eternity, we are special—we are aware. However much we may be like electrons in some giant model, however much society begins to resemble a computer circuit, there is one difference. We are aware of it, as individuals, and we can change the model from within. ^^ David Crossley is an editor of Breakthrough. 1970: A Chronology January 1 On the front page this New Year's Day of the new decade is this headline: "Gl War Toll Goes Over 40,000." The Agriculture Department announces a ban on paprika in most meat products because it can mask "undesirable qualities" from the consumer. The Dow Jones stands at 800.36. The city council and mayor okay pay raises for police and firefighters. A first year "patrolman" or "pipe and ladder- man" will earn $625 per month instead of $600. Elsewhere, receptionists jobs go for $375 to $400 each month. President Nixon okays Spanish-speaking and -surname headcount in the next census. Jimmy Hoffa, in jail, asks Nixon to commute his sentence. A contract is awarded to create Lake Conroe. Lloyd Bentsen is "seriously considering" a senate race against Ralph Yarborough. Boston scientist Bernard D. Davis, who was first to isolate a single gene, tells reporters that "test tube life is not in the near future." (Less than a year later, biologists at State University of New York in Buffalo report the first artificial synthesis of a living cell.) Delores Heller, of Norfolk, Virginia, shoots a boa constrictor in her kitchen. No one knows how it got into her kitchen, or to Norfolk, for that matter. CERTAIN DETAILS The U.S. "expressed regrets" to Cambodia for casualties caused during a battle on the South Vietnamese border. In London, news leaks of a U. S. Middle East plan that would let Egyptian president Nasser veto any settlement between Israel and Jordan. Israeli jets knock out the East Ghor Canal on the east bank of the Jordan River. The Office of Economic Opportunity says Texas has more low income citizens than any other state. There are 203 million people in the U.S. Nearly 60 percent of the people are optimistic about the 1970's. Newspaper editors select the Apollo 11 moon landing as the top news story of the previous year and decade. Dr. Ralph S. Ryback, speaking to the American Association for the Advancement of Science, says ethanol in alcohol affects the brain's memory for recent events. "As a result," he says, "participants at a cocktail party jump from one topic to another because they forget what they were talking about, where they were in the conversation, and what the other person said." Daily oil consumption in the U. S. is 13.5 billion barrels. The price of a barrel of oil is $2 to $3 Among the movies showing in Houston are Bob and Carol and Ted and Alice, Easy Rider, On Her Majesty's Secret Service, Viva Max, John and Mary, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Reivers and The Sterile Cuckoo. The University of Texas football team finishes the 1969 season number one in the nation, and on this day beats Notre Dame in the Cotton Bowl, 21-17. Henry Ford calls pollution "the most important problem." A new Buick Skylark with air conditioning costs $2795 at Al Parker Buick. A Ford Maverick can be bought for $1888. A top-of-the-line Chevrolet Monte Carlo costs $2586. There aren't many foreign cars for sale, but a Toyota costs $1790 and a new 1969 Peugeot is selling for $2369. There is a sales promotion manager's job advertised for $13,000 per year, and an assistant controller/chemicals can make $12,000 a year. Go-go dancers are paid $125 per week. A Dalmatian costs $50. Several houses are for sale in River Oaks for $40,000-$60,000. It is J. Edgar Hoover's seventy-fifth birthday. Mrs. Betty Crichton of Harlow, England, undergoes her second sterilization operation, the day after giving birth to her sixth child. Pope Paul VI prays forgiveness for "giant industries" prospering on their "diabolical capacity to produce arms" and for powerful nations basing their stability on "trading arms to poor nations lacking plows, schools and hospitals." In his plea for peace, he says, "Lord, it is true! We are not on the right path." Nixon signs the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, creating the Council on Environmental Quality. Israel threatens to take over a 19- mile section of Lebanon in the Gilead Mountain chain. B-52s resume bombing in Vietnam. Louie Welch is sworn in for his fourth term as mayor of Houston. A Chinese news report says Russia is preparing for war with China. 14 A Senate subcommittee opens hearings on the dangers of oral contraceptives. 16 Muammar el-Kaddafy becomes premier of Libya. ■bbmwwmjiwiiii i mi inn i ujjuij i 18 Israeli jets bomb military targets near Cairo. 19 Nixon nominates G. Harold Carswell to the U.S. Supreme Court. (The Senate had rejected Nixon's first nominee, Clement F. Haynesworth, Jr. It later does the same to Carswell, and Nixon is not pleased.) 22 The Boeing 747 begins commercial service with a flight from New York to London. 30 The U.S. command in Saigon announces U.S. jets bombed an anti-aircraft installation inside North Vietnam two days earlier. Also this month: The Agriculture Department proposes a ban on the use of animal lungs in hot dogs. Gina Lollobrigida is criticized for wearing a tiger skin coat. February 10 Arab terrorists kill one Israeli and wound 11 other people in a Munich airport. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 17 DECEMBER/JANUARY 1980