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Houston Breakthrough, January 1980
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Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 13. January 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 10, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2129.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1980). Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 13. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2129

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 13, January 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 10, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2129.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, January 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date January 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_556am.jpg
Transcript "Patricia O'Kane, an attorney who deals both privately and with ACLU in sex discrimination cases, says the Supreme Court Opinion on pregnancy benefits reinforces old sexist stereotypes that most women can afford to stay home with the children and not work . . ." Houston Chronicle, December 9, 1976 WHEN WE NEED FRIENDS OTHER WOMEN TELL US I HA VE TO SA VE THINGS FOR MYSELF BECAUSE IM NOT SURE YOU COULD SA VE ME IF OUR PLACES WERE REVERSED BECAUSE I SUSPECT YOU WONT EVEN BE AROUND TO SA VE ME WHEN I NEED YOU IM ALONE ON THE STREETS AT5 IN THE MORNING IM ALONE COOKING MY RICE "In the Matter of the Marriage of X Patricia A. O'Kane and X Michael T. Donahue X In the Court of Domestic Relations No. 2, Harris County, TEXAS" Harris County, Divorce records, May, 1977. SLOWLY WE BEGIN Gl VING BA CK WHA T WAS TA KEN AWAY OUR RIGHT TO THE CONTROL OF OUR BODIES KNOWLEDGE OF HOW TO FIGHT AND BUILD FOOD THAT NOURISHES MEDICINE THA T HE A LS SONGS THA T REMIND US OF OURSEL VES AND MAKE US WANT TO KEEP ON WITH WHA T MA ITERS TO US "It is incredible to me that this is the 10th year that women attorney, law students and legal workers have organized a national conference on Women and the Law I hope to be participating in the 30th conference that brings us all together to discuss legal issues affecting women." PAO'K, Tenth Annual Conference on Women and the Law, March, 1979, San Antonio. LETS COME OUT AGAIN JOINING WOMEN COMING OUT FOR THE FIRST TIME KNOWING THIS LOVE MAKES A GOOD DIFFERENCE IN US AFFIRMING A CONTINUING LIFE WITH WOMEN WE MUST BE LOVERS DOCTORS SOLDIERS ARTISTS MECHANICS FARMERS ALL OUR LIVES WA VES OF WOMEN TREMBLING WITH LOVE AND ANGER 'The National Women's Conference has overwhelmingly endorsed the rights of Lesbians to openly pursue a homosexual lifestyle. When the sexual preference issue came on the floor, several hundred promoters of the lesbian cause came into the hall, many carrying signs and balloons with slogans saying 'We are everywhere' " SINGING WE MUST RAGE "^^ ^^^ N°VGmber 21' 197?" KISSING, TURN AND BREAK THE OLD SOCIETY WITHOUT BECOMING THE NAMES IT PRAISES THE MINDS IT PAYS "Dear Ms O'Kane, It has been our pleasure to approve and place on record the Articles of Incorporation for the Houston Area Women's Center. We extend our best wishes for success in your new venture." r- ^ Secretary of State to PAO'K Octohpr 1Q77 EAT RICE HAVE FAITH IN WOMEN October 1977. WHA TI DO NT KNOW NOW I CAN STILL LEARN SLOWLY SLOWLY IF I LEARN I CAN TEACH OTHERS IF OTHERS LEARN FIRST I MUST BELIEVE THEY WILL COME BACK AND TEACH ME "An activist attorney has been named by Mayor Jim McConn to Houston's newly created Police Advisory Commission. Patricia O'Kane called her appointment 'a clear indication of the political clout of the gay community.' " U.THCEHAVE FA,THm WOMEN by P,„ „,„.„,. S^&tSSSS Loraine Elms Futurist and urban planner I regularly plan programs for the World Future Society's local gatherings, so this fl exercise—a retrospective piece on the past' rA decade—should prove a worthwhile one $| for a futurist. It might provide a wider perspective of my present, and offer an even better prospective on my own future. That noun, prospective, is one of my I favorite words and symbolic of my approach to urban/regional, corporate or other planning work that I do, for the word addresses conditions as they exist, yet envisions changes—ideally, in time to plan for necessary changes before crises occur. In Retrospect Towards the end of 1969 we lived on some Virginia acreage near Washington, D.C. where I spent about equal time wandering through the woods down towards the pond, housewifing, and working as a research assistant. One morning, our 16-year-old daughter left her leaf-raking and invited her parents to join her in a march on Washington to protest Nixon's planned invasion of Cambodia. My husband's ailing heart kept him from going but I went with her. I marched, listened to earnest speeches, and still marvel at how 300,000 young f people from all across the country knew 3Jj to gather on the ellipse across from the W White House within 10 days despite their gf having no access to any major television & channels, nor to the larger newspapers. That was prelude to the seventies for me. The Vietnam War dragged on into it. A decade ago, with two daughters almost raised, I realized my husband was dying. I decided that if I must be alone I had to become a more interesting person for myself to be around. To that end, I enrolled in the graduate program in urban studies in the new town of Reston, Vir- ^^s^mmm iSss. ■■smK ginia, because it was the'most interdisciplinary course I could find. By mid-January 1974, John Elms was dead, buried in view of the mountain at Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada where he'd been a young ski instructor in a earlier day. He had been uncommonly handsome, so interesting, really good for bouncing ideas back and forth. I smile sometimes now to recall that he was the one who got me involved in the women's liberation movement, but dying seems going rather too far to prove the point, don't you agree? We had quite a few dark-humored jokes of that kind. I was working in Washington by this time, at the Public Affairs Council where I learned how larger corporations "interface" with cities and governments, their external environment. The work dovetailed with my courses in urban planning and I became increasingly fascinated with the ways these entities—companies, on the one hand, and cities, local, state and national and international governments on the other hand-become ever more symbiotic in their relations with one another. I loved my work, the people I worked with, but financially, I was falling behind. As a native Houstonian, letters from my mother, begging me to come live with her so she wouldn't have to move to a nursing home, letters explaining her impending blindness, her failing stamina, brought me to a decision to return after 25 years in the north. Mother died last spring. My daughters are in California and Virginia. My M.A. in Urban Studies, three years urban planning experience, and good friends; these are mine now. I find myself in pretty good shape to enter another decade-except financially. The Gray Panthers I plan to remedy the financial defi ciency by testing the claims of certain larger firms that they will hire well-qualified individuals in management positions without regard to age or sex. I have excellent background for being an issues management expert in a corporate setting. Until recently corporations seldom hired a 56-year-old woman for such a position. To combat that policy, born of stereotyping, I became one of the founding mothers (in 1976) of the Houston Chapter of the Gray Panthers, an organi- ation of both young and old citizens established to combat ageism, whether subtle or blatant. As one young Gray Panther member put it, "The average length of time spent with the larger corporation by management personnel is now seven years. My mother and my grandfather each has more good years than that to give to a company. Hiring older people, even for entry and mid-level positions in management makes good sense now." Indeed, corporations still follow an outmoded policy of hiring younger management on the assumption that, given the proper incentives, they will be with the firm another 30 years. Facts contradict this, but status-quo thinking dies hard. Last October 25, 500 concerned citizens including Maggie Kuhn and other Gray Panthers and religious leaders, shut down the Department of Energy in Washington for the whole afternoon. With no arrests and no violence to make it "newsworthy," this unprecedented obstruction of DOE operations by a wide cross-section of Americans went virtually unreported outside Washington, D.C. The Gray Panthers in Houston lies fallow as an organization these days. Lack of funds and office space rather than lack of interest, make me suspect this condition will correct itself in the early '80's. ^'Nwrf^*?^**^ *WWW*?SWi W< ^**wwa^aa^^ HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 13 DECEMBER/JANUARY 1980