Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough, January 1980
Page 9
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 9. January 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 10, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2125.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1980). Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 9. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2125

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 9, January 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 10, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2125.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, January 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date January 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_556ai.jpg
Transcript Gertrude Barnstone Artist, full-time activist and part-time welder Ten years ago was for me the end of much, which thank goodness, always means the beginning of much. It marked the end of a marriage, the end of a five-year term on the Houston School Board, and the end of not having to work for a living. There were personal high spots during the seventies, such as having a free hand to create and produce an "educational" children's program on Channel 2. There was work with Houston Breakthrough when it began; there's been a lot of time spent in Washington on a radio series A Texan in Washington. Then there was the unsuccessful race for a seat in the State Senate. Thankfully, there were jobs, though it became increasingly apparent that em-. ployers—and potential employees—are really scared of people who have wandered through the liberal area of the political forest. (I was active in the women's movement and the ACLU.) And to be considered controversial! Wow! There was the revelation about the Criminal Investigation Division of the Houston Police Department; surveilling and keeping records on thousands of noncriminal Houstonians. As one of the "surveyed" whose name was revealed (my file was under the category Subversive, Women's Liberation) I became a named Nice that time divides up into neat parcels — years, decades — so we can bundle them up, put them aside and start afresh. — Gertrude Barnstone plaintiff-with Larry Sauer and the Houston Chapter of the ACLU-in a $55 million suit against several police and city officials. That suit is still hanging fire. A really important element was added to my experiences when I got into transcendental meditation. At a very low point, a friend urged t.m. and suddenly my problems changed from huge mountains to gentle hills. Most important, and this fits right into my growing feminist awareness, I got a sense of myself that I'd not felt since childhood; not me the mother, the daughter, the wife, the lover, politician, media person—but the before-any- thing-else, me. At some point one asks—what is it that I really want—not what I think I should want, not what others think I should want, but what does the one inside of the me really want? That kind of thinking headed me back toward sculpture which had been my total involvement for years before the fight for civil rights and integration had swept everything else aside. In order to do the work I had wanted to do years before-work with fabric and with metal on a large scale, I went to Houston Community College and learned welding. It was a thrill to drape the large nylon piece over the lake in Hermann Park for Main Street '76—an idea set aside years before finally materialized! A most interesting thing happenened later that year when I nearly died of viral pneumonia. I can almost recommend it for what that did to clarify my thinking and sense of self. Suddenly, I knew exactly what I wanted and how I was going to do it: devote myself totally to sculpture and support myself with a part-time job welding. And that's exactly what I've done. Welding is a fascinating activity—people who have done it know what a great coordination of concentration and relaxation it can be. It has been described as a day-long mantra. Believe me, it beats an office job—nobody cares what your politics are; all that matters is that this job in hand is well done. And what a relief to have a job which doesn't depend on someone else; which has nothing to do with p.r., with image or pretense; it is either a good weld or a poor weld. It enables me to sculpt and I'll admit that I enjoy it as a political statement. Nice that time passes and helps one change. Looking back, I find that things which terrified me 10 years ago—like being alone—I now relish. Nice, too, that time divides up into neat parcels—years, decades—so we can bundle them up, put them aside and start afresh. !Mmttltf»*Mf^^ In 1970, I was in the closed circuit television business and produced the second Muhamed Ali comeback fight at Madison Square Garden. — Fred Hofheinz Fred Hofheinz Mayor of Houston, 1973-77 1970 was a watershed year for a lot of people in politics. The previous year was one in which the Houston school board majority was changed in a dramatic way. I had worked with Jonathan Day and Vic Samuels and others in the political upheaval that resulted in a new majority for the school board and the election, coincidentally, of two new members of the Houston City Council. It was obvious that there was a reform . attitude on the part of large numbers of Houstonians who riidn't share the establishment's view of the government, whether it was the school board or the city council. 1970 was, for me, a year of vigorous j business activity. I was involved in my personal and private affairs, greatly. In December 1970, I was in the closed circuit television business and produced the second of the Muhamed Ali comeback fights out of Madison Square Garden. [Earlier that year] I participated in the Ralph Yarborough election—I helped raise Ralph Yarborough money and had organized a major banquet for his U.S. Senate race. And when he was defeated by Lloyd Bentsen in the fall, I helped Lloyd in his race against George Bush. What was going on in the nation was going on locally. There was a great deal of reaction to abuse of power in government during the late 60's and early 70's. A tremendous amount. That is what politicized me and that is what, ultimately, elected me Mayor of Houston in 1973. We organized a dissent that was already .there. The dissent in Houston translated into an anti-Herman Short, anti-police department, anti-10-year-incumbent (Louie Welch) sentiment. We organized it beginning in January 1971. The election wasn't until the fall. We came within 15,000 votes of winning in November 1971 — which was considered very close. The rest is public record. As far as my personal involvement is concerned after 1971—everything I did was well-reported. Today, I'm deeply involved in personal business. I rarely give interviews. After serving as mayor of Houston for two terms, Fred Hofheinz chose not to run for a third. w**«w>*^^****^^ Ruth Milburn Chair of Texas Common Cause When the seventies began, I was a full- time homemaker with two small children, married to a college professor, active in the Parent Teacher Organization and the Faculty Wives Club. My hobbies were cooking, knitting, and bridge club once a week. At the end of that decade I am a geo- physicist and computer programmer. I am the principal breadwinner in my family; my husband is retired from teaching and is a free-lance writer and technical translator. I am active in grass roots politics, and currently chair the largest citizen's lobby group in Texas. I direct a volunteer chorus, and (some things stay the same) play bridge once a week. The women's movement is directly responsible for many of the changes which occurred in my life. The founding of the Harris County Women's Political Caucus set me on a course of active involvement with the political process. The many fine women I met and worked with in the caucus, the National Organization for Women and Women's Equity Action League provided me with support, confidence, and a resolve to become all that I can be. It is in the spirit of that resolve that I face the eighties with optimism and a belief that the changes have only begun. \y HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH DECEMBER/JA-NUARY 1980