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Houston Breakthrough, January 1980
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Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 8. January 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 11, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2124.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1980). Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2124

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 8, January 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 11, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2124.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, January 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date January 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 8
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File Name femin_201109_556ah.jpg
Transcript WHO 10 What have you Deen doing? And who are you now? 0 • -*.-.. I guess it's all right now to say that more than once, LSD inspired us. — Don Gardner Don Gardner Co-founder of KPFT Radio For almost ten years Pam Murfin and I have lived on an isolated, worked-out Big Thicket farm. Our lives are so different now from what they were in 1970! It is delightful that I am remembered by some in Houston, and it's been fun trying to organize a few sentences that paint a picture of the last decade. 1970 was not just another year for me; on the contrary, it was filled with intense drama. Three events stand out and they are connected by the type of coincidence my friend Peyton Bryan calls luck or God. But let me digress to 1968, when Larry Lee talked me into leaving a job as a reporter at the San Antonio Light. With $4,000 donated by Jubal Parten, we opened a development office at 1200 Bissonnet for the Pacifica Foundation. We were the only employees for a year and a half as we gathered friends and volunteers around us and raised $86,000 for a people's radio station, a free and open voice, in the toughest city in the South. We thought we were doing the most important work in the world. My mind floods with memories of those difficult years. We were harassed by the KKK and government agent provocateurs every step of the way. At least three times Larry and I were faced with the decision of whether or not to give up: we no longer had money to pay ourselves, the project looked at deadends, and we were always tired. I guess it's all right now to say that, more than once, LSD sessions helped inspire us to the challenge. There were many who stuck with us, and fed us, and without them there would never have been a KPFT. My first dramatic event of 1970 occurred on March 1, at about 7:30 p.m. If you had your FM radio tuned to 90.1 you heard the Beatles' "Here Comes the Sun" vibrating from a previously silent channel. KPFT was born that night. One month later a woman I had never seen before walked into the station asking to see Don Gardner. She was one of Houston's first environmental activists and she had a story she couldn't get anyone else to listen to. We fell in love right there. Our lives were joined and surely no one could have imagined we would still be together, but we are. A couple of weeks after Pam and I met, KPFT's transmitter was dynamited and destroyed by the Klan. The first bombing (there were two) was a godsend. It gave us a chance to regroup. But there was more trouble. Internal bickerings, a severe ulcer, and fatigue were reason enough for me to split the scene once we were back on the air. I was also under felony indictment for refusing the draft and we were preparing to run from the Feds if necessary. Pam and I wanted to get out of the city, get out of politics, and try to build a simpler life together. After driving over the southern U.S. hunting "the right place," we found it one muggy August, 1970, day in San Jacinto County on the Trinity River. We now call it Goose Summer Farm and it is one of the most beautiful spots in southeast Texas. It is home, and, if I may borrow a label from the native Americans, we have come in touch with the Great Spirit here. One is not necessarily more sane because one lives in the country. For five years we lived somewhat like hermits. This kind of life requires that you look at yourself with unceasing honesty, again and again. There were some very dark times, but every breakthrough requires a preceding crisis. Out of nothingness was born a new faith in nature as God. A faith that nature is and always will be; acceptance that what is, is. Our particular development led us to Zen, an ancient philosophy close to our own. Currently raging within the Zen community in the U.S. is a debate over whether or not Zen Buddhists should be involved in politics, in public issues. We found we could not not get involved in certain issues that seem to affect us so directly. It boils down to accepting responsibility. We had had our time of looking inward and now we began to expand. Our search for the laws of nature led us to cast off our prejudices against children. After the tragic death of our first baby, we are now privileged to be caring for two beautiful daughters, three year old Dawn Rivamist and baby Aurora Leah. Both girls were born here on the farm. We have, in addition to raising children, become active in certain local issues, on one hand, and in certain planetary issues, on the other. I do not view politics as I did in 1970. I believe that hearts must change before minds will change. For us, whether or not to be involved in politics is not a matter of choice. A bell that has been rung cannot be unrung. Once you see, you cannot unsee. Four planetary issues immediately come to mind as important now and tomorrow: an end to the release of toxic/genetic chemicals into the environment, women's rights, feeding the world's hungry, and the complete dismantling of all nuclear technology. Life on a simple day to day, person to person level is so rich and full. I am, however, deeply concerned about this spectre of nuclear holocaust that hangs over our daily lives. I bumped into an old colleague in a Houston health food store recently and she wanted to know what I thought about the city after all these years. All I could think was, good luck to you all. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH DECEMBER/JANUARY 1980