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Houston Breakthrough, January 1980
Page 4
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Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 4. January 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 7, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2120.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1980). Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2120

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, January 1980 - Page 4, January 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 7, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/2148/show/2120.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, January 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date January 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_556ad.jpg
Transcript UimWiMMili PLUPERFECT *(ploo pur'fikt) adj. more than perfect Houston's newest and most exciting condominium home experience is ready and receiving home buyers. You are invited into a world of fine quality located amidst exceptional shops and restaurants in the Westheimer corridor. Come to River Stone. It's Fashionable . .. Prestigious.. . Contemporary... Casual ... Exciting Low 40's to mid-60's River Stone usHome 6u4 miles west of the Galleria on Westheimer, then left on Walnut Bend in the West Chase area. 781-8701 What Equal Housing Means to You RIVER STONE, IN COOPERATION WITH U. S. HOME MORTGAGE CO., IS LEADING THE WAY FOR CAREER WOMEN AND UNMARRIED COUPLES TO OWN THEIR OWN CONDOMINIUM HOMES. 95% FINANCING WITH $450 CLOSING COST IS AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED PURCHASERS REGARDLESS OF SEX. Serving the Greater Houston Community With Quality... LEISURE LEARNING UNLIMITED No Matter What's Your Bag: Dance, Drama, Music, Business, Sports of All Sorts, Languages, Art, Cooking or Personal Development. In our November-Qecember schedule, which you can receive by calling 721-7299. we offer a wide variety of classes. Some classes are free and registration is easy. Its all news to us! BY GABRIELLE COSGRIFF The first issue of Breakthrough came out in January of the bicentennial year. We couldn't tolerate celebrating 200 years of the nation's history without making the statement that women are news. Now, four years later, in the first month of a new decade, we want to build on that statement, and declare what we've known all along: women's news is everybody's news. In the last year, particularly, we've broadened our scope to include more political and environmental stories, more people issues. We feel it's time to acknowledge this growth, and to enter the 1980s as a general circulation newspaper. This will not lessen our commitment to women. As Don Gardner, co-founder of KPFT Radio, says in this issue: "Once you see, you cannot unsee." We want Breakthrough to be a newspaper that will speak to both women and men, that will affirm our common humanity. With this issue we welcome David Crossley as a new editor to Breakthrough. David has worked with us for over a year and is responsible for many of our design changes - he loves big pictures and feels, as we do, that photographs communicate as significantly as words. David is a former editor of Houston City Magazine and the co-author of the nuclear story that appeared in our June issue. He was a reporter-editor for Texas Monthly, and, 8 years ago, was manager of KPFT-Radio. We are also establishing an investigative reporter's fund, through the tax-exempt Breakthrough Foundation. In time, this will enable us to tackle important community stories that go unreported. We want to report on all the news. As our new logo says, "It's all news to us." Coming out of the 1970s reminds me of the exquisite cartoon by Max Beerbohm, "Lord Byron shaking the dust of England from his feet." With an elegant flick of the ankle, the foppish Byron departs for mmrns- a/o.'vo/svdp\t! turn it off/ i cant sear to watch anymore/ '■imm&i Italy's more civilized clime. His good- riddance-to-bad-rubbish sneer could well serve as a comment on the 70s, as we shake the dust of Nixon, Vietnam and Three Mile Island from our disco-weary feet. Or, as Texas Monthly put it, "There just had to be a better way to get from the 60s to the 80s." So how to document the decade? Ms. magazine gave us an impressive account of what had been happening to women. Time and Newsweek and TV gave us the highlights and lowlights on the national and international scene. Everybody had a 70s roundup, from Agnewto Zimbabwe. We preferred to look closer to home, and find out what Houstonians had been up to for the past 10 years. David Crossley (see photo) shot the cover picture of Gary and Pearl Chason and we set about asking the question, "Who were you 10 years ago?" We found some interesting answers — a jewel thief who went on to become a social activist, and a closed-circuit television producer who became a two-term mayor of Houston. A man who fled the city to settle on Goose Summer Farm in east Texas and a woman who found peace in an Indian ashram. Sixteen Houstonians, all of whom have changed their city and its future, make up our cover story. Not everybody we asked is represented. Some found it too painful to relive those years. Others didn't feel them worth remembering. Still others we never could contact. Lee Otis Johnson, for example, was a local cause celebre 10 years ago. He is now in the federal correctional fa cility in Tallahassee, Florida, sent there from Huntsville "for his own protection," we were told. Marvin Zindler went to the hospital for heart surgery the day after we talked to him. "The only difference with me is, 10 years ago, I was behind a badge, now I'm behind a TV camera," he told us. (In 1970, Zindler was with the Harris County Sheriff Department's consumer fraud division). "I don't put (wrongdoers) in jail now, I put them on TV. That's probably worse, anyway." 1970 was the most dramatic and least-remembered year of the decade retrospectives. David Crossley chronicled its key events spending several days at the downtown library. Liberty Hall was a 70s institution in Houston, as much a social experiment as a musical one. Janice Blue interviews its co-founder, Ryan Trimble, who has "played more famous people's guitars than anybody else in town." We introduce a new contributing editor from London, David Helton, a transplanted Texan. Unlike Lord Byron, Helton likes living in England. Houstonian Niami Hanson tells of her involvement in the march on the Seabrook, New Hampshire, nuclear plant last fall. It's interesting that the 70s began with the anti-war movement and ended with the anti-nuclear movement — maybe a sign that the 'me' ethos was not as pervasive as we thought. Anyway, if the 70s was really the 'me' decade, how come everybody was walking around with someone else's name on their jeans? HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH DECEMBER/JANUARY 1980