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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976
Page 16
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 16. November 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 13, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/194.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 16. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/194

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 16, November 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 13, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/194.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 16
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_522p.jpg
Transcript stars HOUD4Y SUBSCRIPTIONS TO HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH give a gift to yourself or a friend name address. city state -zip- name address. city state -ZIP- gift card to read. $5.00 a year to Houston Breakthrough P.O. Box 88072, Houston 77004 UH continued from page 1 shall not, on the basis of sex, apply different rules or regulations, impose different fees or requirements, or offer different services or benefits related to housing . . ." Van Hightower said that since UH is a state university receiving federal funds the regulations "would deal with all university facilities" including the dormitories. "I think they have absolutely no business in trying to lock the women away. It's just the same old stereotype of women being protected/' Dr. Van Hightower added. "My own personal opinion is that we're dealing with human lives. Many girls have a certain satisfaction that it (UH dorm policy) comforts them from rape and other crimes such as theft," Thomas S. Pennet, UH Associate Director of Housing said. "We have had some incidents (of rape) in the past five years but none for two to three years now," he said. Pennet said that "things improved dramatically and there were no assaults" since around - the — clock security guards were added to the all- female tower of Moody Towers dormitory. The female students living there are required to complete a form giving a guest's name, phone and room number where they will be visiting. "My recollection is that there were two actual rapes in the bathroom areas of Moody Towers and one attempted rape about five years ago/' Pennet said. Yet Pennet said there was the same number of rapes in the UH Quadrangle dormitories, which include two co-ed dormitories where both women and men live on the same floor. Pennet also said there were "no incidents of rape in the Quad." in the past two to three years. He said that many female students desire the policy of limited visitation along with the parents of new students who "select this for their daughter." "I'm caught" Pennet said. "I'm in a position of you're damned if you do and damned if you don't. If we don't have some kind of guidelines we're going to catch all kinds of hell. "To be real frank with you, if they (students) don't like it they can go live somewhere else," Pennet said. A few women students verified that they felt safer with the security and visitation policy. But they were in the minority. In a recent poll of 80 dorm residents from all dorms on campus, 80 per cent of the students felt that signing a guest in and out infringed on their guest's privacy. A 70 per cent majority of students felt that their own privacy was invaded by the practice, and 79 per cent of the students disagreed with the policy of requiring females to sign male guests in and out. Ninety per cent of the women in Moody Towers wanted more visiting hours as compared to only 30 per cent of the Bates Hall residents. One hundred per cent of the men polled wanted to keep 24-hour visitation in the all-male dorms. Ironically, 76 per cent of the students thought females needed more protection than men. Sixty per cent of the males polled thought women were discriminated against in the UH dorms compared to 43 per cent of the women who felt they had been discriminated against. Beth Tudor, anthropology junior, said that many female students "commonly refer to Moody Towers as the 'virgin vault.' You feel like a virgin being jailed in an ivory tower," she added. "Security and the people at the desk were literally keeping tabs on who visited you." Tudor said she "had a bit of a run in" with one of the security guards who currently works in the security at the dormitory. She added that she would tease her about the male friends she had to her room. Tudor said that the security employee's friends that worked at the desk on other shifts kept track of her visitors and would also try to embarass her. "They've (desk personnel) given some women bad reputations. They are just like little sponges/' Tudor said. "The thing about locking women up is that it attracts the men and creates a mystique." The former Moody Towers resident now lives in a campus co-ed dorm. "If an SA (student advisor) wants to get in to visit his girlfriend, he can very easily -- and believe me they do," she said. Tudor said that she would not be afraid without the security personnel. "That's never bothered me. It seems to me if you are old enough to be in college, then you're old enough to take the precaution of locking your door and not letting any strangers in." Tudor added that a student would be confronted with the same situation when living off- campus after graduating. "Let's face it, there's going to be men in the world and risks. Even if it bothers you, you can't change that fact." There are other laws that might apply to discrimination in UH dorms. An attorney who considers himself "well-versed in the federal housing discrimination laws" said that he "is of the opinion that it (the UH policy for all-female dorms) violates these laws. The policy is obviously discriminatory," he said. The attorney has a private practice and also works in cooperation with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). He said "the only way to know for certain that the practices are illegal would be to try them in a court case." The attorney, who requested that his name be withheld, referred to Fair Housing section 3601 through 3631, including section 3604: ". . .it shall be unlawful. . .(b) To discriminate against any person in the terms, conditions, or privileges of sale or rental of a dwelling, or in the provision of services or facilities in connection therewith, because of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin." Another ACLU cooperating attorney, Patti O'Kane, said that it is a violation of Title IX. She also said if she were to prosecute a similar hypothetical case, she would refer to the state Equal Rights Amend-