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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976
Page 14
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 14. November 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 13, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/192.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 14. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/192

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 14, November 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 13, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/192.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_522n.jpg
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Shutters, bedspreads, wallpaper, etc. of big savings. HOLIDAY INTERIORS, INC. 3231 HILLCROFT at Richmond 780-7151 MANPOWER continued from page 1 Toward the end of the job descriptions was one for a security guard. The pay was over $700 per month and the only requirement was a high school diploma. I pointed it out, and the counselor laughed so loudly that every head in the office turned in our direction. "Be realistic," she said. After having spent several hours at the center, I had to leave to meet other obligations. I was told to return the next morning when, hopefully, they would set up interviews for some of those office jobs. After several queries about child care it was suggested I try to get on a waiting list for "Headstart." One counselor offered me some helpful advice. Since I hadn't any work experience it would probably help to impress my future boss by "fixing yourself up." (I was wearing a neat skirt at the time.) "Wear stockings, a nice dress, makeup -- you know what I mean." Gehrig Coleman, a Rice student, was curious too and offered to go through the program himself. His assumed background was similar: divorced father of two with no support; little job experience; two years in college. When he arrived at the Service Center, only one other applicant was waiting, which created a relaxed atmosphere. Coleman completed an application form immediately; the CETA program was fully described to him; and he was offered testing and training. In response to his question on child care, he was given the name of a nursery where he was told he would receive reduced rates. Saying that he preferred immediate placement, Coleman and a Texas Employment Commission counselor discussed jobs in labor, sales and management training. He told me later, "It's possible that because I'm a man and had some college experience I ended up being pointed to a management position." He was eventually offered an interview for a job as manager trainee earning about $700 per month. The practice of counselors earning points for every applicant placed in jobs encourages direct placement. However, the main ambition of CETA is to provide vocational training. Many CETA applicants receive training at the Skills Center, 1500 Louisiana. Although the center is a division of Houston Community College, the majority of the 466 students presently enrolled are CETA participants. Of these, 81% are Black, 14% are Mexican-American and 5% are White. Trainees are pre-tested for aptitude in a given vocation prior to enrollment at the center. During training each student is counseled regularly to ensure his or her satisfactory completion of the course. "We train competent employees ready to enter the local job market." Students can work at their own pace in one of the 17 courses available. Ernest Luna, director of the Skills Center, stresses "student accountability/' Two hundred women are enrolled in training programs, 90% of them in the "clerical cluster," which includes file clerk, steno I, and clerk typist training. One man is enrolled in tbis area. About 15 women are being trained for non-traditional jobs, and the ones I spoke to requested this training on their own initiative. Most of these named higher earnings as a prime incentive for their choice. They like the programs at the Skills Center and felt they've received the same treatment and training as their male counterparts. Janice Melton expects to find a good job as a machinist after graduation. But Theresa Chavez, a welder, thinks she'll be lucky to find a job as a trainee when she's through. She feels a man would not have any problem. The promise of CETA is realized in these few women. They exude determination, foresight and self-confidence. But for the majority of women, who do not already possess an awareness of the broad range of their alternatives when they enter the program, is CETA just another deadend street? In his new $4,500-per-month office at One Allen Center, CETA director Palmer Bowser outlined services one should expect to receive at one of four CETA Service Centers in the city. He was as cool and polished as the room he occupied. Standardized achievement tests, "hand-on" skills aptitude assessment and counseling are used to evaluate all clients, he said. A report is then made indicating four choices for that candidate and she or he is referred to such supportive centers as VGS, Inc., Houston Skills Center and the Urban League. General Education Development (GED) and English as a Second Language (ESL) programs are also offered. CETA received over 10,000 applicants in the past year. Of that number, 3,049 completed job training programs and found permanent, unsubsidized jobs. Bowser feels that this is a "good average," and explained that some participants enter college or the armed forces. Describing the CETA program as a "big success," Bowser sees these positive effects on our city: it benefits the economy, reduces welfare recipients, builds individuals' self- esteem and reduces crime. The majority of CETA participants are women. Not only are they accepted in every area of training, Bowser said, but counselors are urged to encourage their training in non-traditional fields. This view was repeated at UH's Center for Human Resources, which trains CETA counselors. Free day care centers are also provided. When informed of my experiences, Bowser replied, "I don't think it is indicative of the system as a whole." The CETA program is a study in contrasts. That women are not receiving true equality in guidance and training is a present reality. That they will is a promise that is long overdue. Page 14 Houston Breakthrough November 1976