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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976
Page 11
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 11. November 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 13, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/189.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/189

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 11, November 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 13, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/189.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_522k.jpg
Transcript Jeff Millar Dead Pans The future of women's advocacy Kxeorpls from A ttistorv M the Cilv of Houston, ;< 1984 BACK WHRN THE nffkf was first created, a woman's advocate for the city government Scorned like a good idea \o one was arguing with the fact that the female employes of the city needed someone who'd look out for their interests in the midst of a male dominated administration. Rut if the men who created the office thought I he office would he safely cosmetic, good PR designed to get the Feds and nutcase feminists off their backs, they had another think coming. The first indications that the woman's advocate had clout occured when she was able to get a whole city department renamed She determined that the title of the Manpower Division was "inappropriate." It was changed to "Comprehensive Employment Training Division'' over the objections of the City Controller's office that all correspondence from the newly-renamed division required two sheets of paper just to accomodate the letterhead. The woman's advocate then discovered an obscure paragraph in some title of some Federal municipal assistance program It was determined Woman writer barred from UT dressing room Austin (AP)—A female sportswriter for The Daily Texan says she tried to interview Longhorn players in the dress- ing room after Texas' 13-12 victory over SMU but was prevented from going in. "Naked football players scampering to and fro would not be a distraction," Laura Tuma insisted in the University of Texas student newspaper. "My only purpose," she said, "would be to listen and take notes. No one would even know I was there." A policeman noticed her, however, and barred her entrance. Tuma said she asked Coach Darrell Royal about visiting the dressing room after games. "No women and that's that," replied Royal. "Would you consider —?" "No," he said. "It might not bother you, but it would bother the boys." "Could you arrange some way for women to conduct postgame interviews?" "Well, I give interviews all the time, but not in my bedroom," she said Royal replied. Appeared in The Houston Chronicle October 27,1976 Submitted by J an Cunningham that the city could be denied towering piles of Federal matching sums if the city were caught engaging in vaugely defined "sexist behavior.'' With the considerable leverage of being able to blow the whistle to the Feds, the office of woman's advocate suddenly developed clout It quintupled its staff as the woman's advocate began her 'mandate to completely desexify city government." When It was learned that some male city officials jokingly referred to themselves as 'male chauvinist pig«," the OWA began a massive crackdown on jokes. "Humor is no defense," announced the woman's advocate sternly in a televised address "Sexism aside, city government is serious business. There's no room for joking. Jokes in city hall should be taken as seriously as those in airport departure lounges." Special agents of the OWA's Humor Squad began patrolling hallways. Men's rooms were equipped with hidden microphones. High level city officials were confronted with tape-recorded evidence of having said "tootsie," "cupcake" and the like Most resigned after a court test determined that a city employes' right to joke was •'limited to the privacy of his/her own home." In !977, OWA won its most dramatic victory to date, finally crushing its most truculent opponent, Public Works, with a stunning one-two punch. First, after a two year struggle. Public Works, following the other city divisions such as Real Estate and Legal, agreed to drop ''department" from its title. The OWA had determined that the last syllable of the word was sexist. When Public Works refused to change the word "manhole cover" to the OWA recommended "Subterranean Work Area Access Portal Closure Device." OWA succeeded in getting a Federal court injuction authorizing OWA to impound and remove all the offending objects. Public outrage over the disappearance of 14 children and their tricycles forced Public Works to comply. By 1979. the OWA's 5.240 employes had moved Into their own 23-story building in the Allen Center complex. More than 2.000 additional staf' Appeared in the Houston Chronicle (801 Texas, 77002) on October 3, 1976. were hired to begin what the woman's advocate called "the final thrust of civic desexification." OWA determined that "a suble sexism" existed in many of the city's street names OWA Nomenclature Alternization Specialists began the task of providing new names for streets which the woman's advocate promised "will be as close as possible to what residents are used to — without containing sexist syllables." Quitman St. was renamed Quitperson St ; Manchester St was renamed Running Among All the Ship Channel Industries St. despite the objections of residents of the area that the new street signs caused their yards to die from tack of light In 1984. OWA issued what it conceded would be Its most unpopular decision Saying that "sexism is sexism," more than 150 city employes were required to change unacceptable syllables in their names. Rather than lose their jobs, all those affected complied except one councilperson. who com plained that he would have to change his entire surname. When told of the couneilperson's reaction, the woman's advocate said; "Tough toenail." Submitted by J ana Pellusch Submitted by Dave Gibson Look at it this way: Your wife's spending $250 a month on meditation lessons to forget $12,000 worth of college education.] And you're still drinking ordinary scotch? November 1976 Houston Breakthrough Page 11