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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 6. November 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 13, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/184.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/184

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 6, November 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 13, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/184.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 6
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File Name femin_201109_522f.jpg
Transcript Satellites: potential benefits for women By Karen Barrett A mind-boggling communications technology may come within our grasp very soon. On October 17, 1976, the National Space and Aeronautics Administration (NASA) sponsored a two-day conference, a "Public Service Communications Satellites User Requirements Workshop/' in Easton, Maryland. They invited 140 persons from both the public and private sectors to participate, in hopes of defining public service communications requirements. NASA intends to use information gathered from this workshop as a guide for the possible formation of a possible public service communications satellite system. The occasion of these discussions is a recent set of technological breakthroughs which will put a new breed of satellites in orbit - satellites capable of transmitting telephone, television, radio and telegraph signals directly to relatively small (three-foot diameter), inexpensive ($500 — $1500) antennae. A tantalizing prospect of large-scale communication facilities available to small groups and individuals at low cost is rapidly unfolding. As we have seen production costs drop on other technologies in the recent past, we may be able to look- forward to ground receivers for satellite communications which cost no more than television sets, or even pocket calculators! NASA's concern for employing these new satellites in the the fact that this new technology, unlike previous electronic communications technologies such as the radio or telephone, is the product of more than $80 billion worth of taxpayer-funded research. It might be conceived of as a return on twenty years' investment in the space program. Breakthrough editor Gertrude Barnstone, in her capacity as a member of KPFT Radio's Local Pacifica Advisory Board, was one of the few women invited to the Easton workshop. Other minorities were even more sparsely represented (one Black and one Indian were present). The possible applications of the new satellites were discussed from the standpoints of educators, environmentalists, librarians, physicians, consumer activists, religious leaders, and various other persons involved in information processing, community organizing, social services, and communications media, as well as a few people representing commercial interests. Barnstone was the only participant to visualize the benefits that satellite communications technology could bring to the women's movement. She proposed that it be employed for the promotion of social equality for women, through education and increased awareness, through enactment of new legislation and through enforcement of existing laws. Barnstone forsees two-way satellite communication as a public interest may be linked to Sivananda ^oga Center* a nonprofit society guided by Swami Vishnu-devananda O full instruction in Hatha & Raja Yoga classes at 2425 W. Ho/combe 667-3161 Teachers Training <SL Vacations in Quebec, the Bahamas, California tool with which to maximize the impact of local, regional and national groups through coordi nating their efforts in filing lawsuits and pressing for new legislation. Government representatives might be contacted directly. Women's groups all across the country could be kept current on each other's activities and could thus benefit from each other's experiences and avoid duplication of efforts. Women in remote areas who are without formal organization might be put in touch with individuals and groups who have faced the same problems. Satellites could open national meetings, important speeches and other significant exchanges of ideas to the response and participation of people who could not ordinarily afford to attend. Women across the country need to be made aware of the resources which exist to help them. They need to know their legal rights, their educational and vocational opportunities, the availability of day care facilities and havens for battered wives — where to seek advice and counseling on all aspects of their lives. Data collection and exchange on these vitally important issues, on all areas of women's status, would be facilitated by a public interest satellite system. Barnstone cites employment statistics as but one example of the type of information which might be processed better with the use of satellite technology. As an information source and an organizing tool, a public service satellite communication system presents a vast array of hopes and possibilities for women. Barnstone, a veteran of similar discussions of the high- minded uses to which cable television could be put, has her misgivings and hopes that this will not prove to be another instance of a technological breakthrough co-opted for strictly commercial use. Should NASA establish a public interest satellite system, we must be prepared to demand access to it, to do our best to see that it operates in our interest. GLENNA CLOUD of the Houston Women's Health Collective speaks to the Women's Group at First Unitarian Church. Sunday mornings at IQam Women's Group meets By Suzanne Gray "We are a group of feminist women engaged in the struggle toward self-transcendence and universal becoming. We feel that the liberation of language (to name the self, the world) is rooted in the liberation of ourselves." So Iris Sizemore interprets the philosophy of the Women's Group at the First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin. It's a vibrant, vital gathering which strives to meet the needs of women in a liberal atmosphere. The Group, which meets at 10 a.m. each Sunday, is not limited to members of the church. Ruth Leddy, one of the founding mothers, welcomes "friends of the church." Nor is it a rigidly structured organization. It began about a year ago with spontaneous, informal rap sessions around the fireplace and evolved into the planned programs which have attracted so many women. Dale Hill, a psychotherapist, will speak on November 7 about homophobia, or fear of our own sex. Dr. Hill says, "Since most of us are more comfortable with what we have always known to be familiar and acceptable, we develop fears and resistance with someone out of the norm - i.e. homophobia." This engagement was triggered by fear one woman expressed in associating with radicals and/or lesbians in the women's movement, ment. November 21, Virginia Davidson, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Baylor, and a private practitioner, will discuss the ethics, or lack of ethics, of the therapist-patient sex issue. She delivered a paper on this subject to the American Psychiatric Association in Miami this year. Dr. Davidson says, "The image of women as available sex objects for their physicians is a notion that permeates our popular culture, and our medical advertising as well." Leddy stresses the idea of "shared leadership from the group of women who come." Planning sessions are open to anyone with ideas for speakers or programs. The general plan is to alternate Sundays of prepared programs with Sundays of open discussion for follow-up. Past speakers have included Dr. Nikki Van Hightower, Houston Women's Advocate; Glenna Cloud, Women's Health Collective. Ann Harris, who is not a church member, spent three months seeking a consciousness-raising group. Eventually, she was referred to the group at the First Unitarian Church. Harris feels that no place else offers their broad spectrum of programs and speakers. She was impressed with the strong self concepts of the women involved and with the feeling of exploration and absence of "game playing." Sizemore has often been asked why the group accepts only women participants - if indeed this doesn't perpetuate the division of the sexes. She replies that the newness of women's identity, as individuals and as a group, warrants this exclusivity. "If women get together, tell the truth, even acknowledging our fears, we can find the common strength to be free." Page 6 Houston Breakthrough November 1976