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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976
Page 3
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 3. November 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 13, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/181.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/181

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 3, November 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 13, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/181.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 3
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File Name femin_201109_522c.jpg
Transcript Carter grants interviews, Ford grants pardons Bv Sam E.|. Akers Is there a choice ? In the last full week of the campaign Gerald Ford could be heard calling for a new federal initiative on airport noise abatement. That says something about the campaign. As educational exercises, American presidential campaigns haven't done too well lately. Here was Jerry in his final whirlwind swing about the nation to cap the neck and neck mad dash for votes, and he was trying to woo votes with airport noise abatement. What a screwbali approach to vote-getting. But then who wouldn't turn a little flakey running the steeplechase to the presidency? J etting to five cities a day was not unusual for Ford and Carter. Ford scheduled a two-hour visit to Houston the Saturday before the election. It is no wonder that he thinks airport noise is a big problem. Campaigning is noisy. Campaigns are noisy, too. As has often been the case, the "issues" in this campaign reflected what Max Lerner calls "our prudent avoidance of ideological politics." When ideology is removed from politics we are left with things like personality. One burning issue of personality in this our historic Bicentennial election year was whether we wanted as president the type of guy who would grant an interview to Playboy. Jimmy Carter, you will recall, had confessed to having lascivious thoughts, used the word "screw" (both of which really shook some people up) and mentioned LBJ and Richard Nixon in the same breath, thus besmirching the name of St. Lyndon the Escolator. Carter's articulation of what seems to be a normal sexual orientation disturbed the insulation between politics and sex. It was, like Playboy boss Hugh Hefner said, "as though granting an interview to Playboy were equivalent to posing naked in the center of the magazine. Although a late September poll showed that a majority of Americans either had not heard about the interview or said it would have no bearing on their vote, Ford made it an issue. Ford said he, too, had been asked to do a Playboy interview but had turned it down. He said it often, too. Playboy said that Ford had never been asked for a full- fledged lengthy interview like should have granted the interview. Even more obliquely related to real issues of government was the consideration of the candidate's relatives' views. Republicans tried to capitalize on Betty Ford's outspokenness and appeal to feminists. The "elect Betty's husband" pitch was logical since polls consistently showed Betty to be more popular than Jerry. Voters who cast Republican ballots because of Betty Ford, and similarly those who went Democratic because of Carter's ebullient mother, Miss Lilian, were deceived. With personality the dominant theme of the campaign, Jimmy Carter's being an "unknown quantity" was a key issue. Fear of the unknown still strikes a responsive chord in American politics. Pollster Lou rrTfie polls show that the one who could do best against Carter is Betty Ford!" (Reprint Courtesy of Chicago Tribune) Carter's. He had been asked for shorter interviews for articles and his staff had been "cordial and cooperative," though in fact no interviews were consummated. After a satirical "I Am Jerry's Brain" ran in the magazine, the White House called to offer the author a chance to "see how the real Jerry Ford's brain works." Apparently the author had seen enough of how the presidential cranium functions, for he declined the invitation. For Carter's part, he finally gave in and declared he never But as syndicated columnist Ellen Goodman (carried by The Houston Post said, it was a trick. Jerry may be personally liberal to "let" his wife sound off in public, but that is the extent of his liberalism. Betty strongly supports the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) but cannot rouse Jerry from his benign neglect of the battle for ratification. "Where Betty favors legalized abortion when it is necessary medically," Goodman said, "Jerry opposes it when it is necessary politically." Harris said the electorate saw its choice as standing pat with a decidedly mediocre president or taking a risk on an inexperienced newcomer. lronically,the people who told us to keep Ford and to fear Carter were, by and large, the same people who had told us not to force Nixon from office for fear of what then Vice President Ford might do - or be unable to do - in the Oval Office. There was really nothing for those people to fear. President Ford proved to be largely a figurehead for the old Nixon administration. Somehow that did not come out as an issue. There was surprisingly little talk that Ford was a staunch defender and "cronie" of the pardoned president. Carter grants interviews, Ford grants pardons. Look who caught the flack. The "trauma of Watergate" was gone, but the Nixon gang wasn't. Two weeks before Nixon's resignation in disgrace, Ford said: "I've watched the (impeachment) proceedings unravel as they have, beginning in 1973. I've read the testimony. I've talked to people who are involved in the House Judiciary Committee. "I can say from the bottom of my heart the president of the United States is innocent. He is right." Once he succeeded to the presidency, Ford rewarded the Nixon stalwarts, the New York Times columnist William V. Shannon listed a few. Agriculture Secretary Earl Butz was kept on until he told one racist joke too many. Nixon aide Anne Armstrong was promoted to ambassador to Great Britain. Nixon chief of staff, key to much of the dirty work of "stonewalling," was made commander of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). CIA chief Richard Helms, whom Nixon made ambassador to Iran, was retained. The list went on: Dean Burch, William Timmons, Mel- vin Laird, Rogers Morton, Harry Dent, John Connally. All old Nixon fans. All welcomed into the Ford fold. "The ultimate expression of the old gang's arrogance," Shannon wrote, "was the selection of Sen. Bob Dole - Nixon's favorite hatchet man - for vice president." There he was, Gerald Ford, the known quantity. Yet that record of bad judgment never really became an issue. League organizes debate By Judy Vinson On October 4, Madeleine Appel received a phone call from Ruth Clusen, national president of the League of Women Voters, informing her that Houston was being considered as a site for the vice presidential debate. While they were still talking, the press began calling on her other line asking for confirmation. "The Yom Kippur service," Appel said later, "was the last moment of sanity I enjoyed until midnight, Friday the 15th, when the whole event was finally over." "Even though we were by no means sure that the debate would actually be held in Houston," Appel said, "the local board and I began making out invitation lists. At first we were told that we would have only 85 tickets to distribute, and these had to cover not only our local members and guests, but also all the Leagues in Texas, plus the state board." Eventually the LWV-H, which has a membership of around 700, was given 260 tickets to distribute. Official confirmation was not given until Thursday, October 7. But Appel said, "When I heard Walter Cronkite announce the location on Wednesday evening, I believed him." "The media weren't the only ones calling the League office," Kathy Watson and Rita Sallans, office staff members said. "The general public, League mem bers and everyone's long ,ost relatives and neighbors called asking for tickets. One man offered the League $500 for a ticket and informed them that he had many wealthy clients. His request for a ticket was turned down, but his name was kept for use during the future finance drive. "The main problem then became finding enough volunteers to assist the debate staff, without totally wiping out all other League activities," said Jeanette Vanderwater, local treasurer and coordinator of volunteers for the debate offices." Vanderwater coordinated the activities of the 20 League members who staffed the debate offices, while other Madeleine Appel, president of the League of Women Voters of Houston and League members Dorothy Lockwood, Jeanette Vanderwater, Becky Moon and Judy Vinson worked on the preparations for the Mondale-Dole vice presidential debates. Continued on page 15 November 1976 Houston Breakthrough Page 3