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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 2. November 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 13, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/180.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1976). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 2. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/180

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976 - Page 2, November 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 13, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/199/show/180.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_522b.jpg
Transcript Editorials In Karen's memory On the evening of November 13, 1974, a white Honda car crashed into a concrete culvert wall on an Oklahoma highway and killed Karen Silkwood, a laboratory assistant at the Kerr-McGee plutonium plant near Oklahoma City. She had been gathering evidence to prove Kerr-McGee knowingly violated nuclear safety laws. She herself had been exposed to high levels of plutonium contamination. At the time of her death, Silkwood was on her way to deliver these documents to a New York Times reporter. The documents were never found. For two years her parents appealed to the government to study evidence of foul play after an accident investigator found her car was hit from behind and forced off the road. On the second anniversary of her mysterious death Merle and Bill Silkwood will file suit against Kerr-McGee, charging them with responsibility for their daughter's death, illegal anti-union activities and negligent enforcement of plant safety standards. House hearings last spring confirmed that the federal agencies and the Justice Department have failed to investigate this case thoroughly. Many questions remain unanswered: • How was Karen contaminated and killed? • What happened to her documents? • Why did FBI agents wait a year to interview witnesses at the scene of the accident? • Why did ERDA not penalize Kerr-McGee? • Why did the FBI take one of their agents off the Silkwood case when he was in the midst of pursuing the contamination question? A legal team has volunteered its services to Karen's parents but even so, the court battle with Kerr-McGee will cost about $100,000. Tax-deductible contributions may be sent to The National Emergency Civil Liberties Foundation (25 E. 26 St., New York City, N.Y. 10010). Supporters of Silkwood (SOS) and national NOW have declared November 13 Silkwood Memorial Day to preserve the memory of Karen and to bring nationwide attention to the need for a complete and public investigation into the circumstances of death of this courageous union sister. We hope the Houston community of women and men will observe this day in her memory. Karen died trying to expose the dangers in the nuclear power industry. She died for us. Breakthrough STAFF - THIS ISSUE Art— Gertrude Barnstone, Prairie Jackson, Mark Stinson Advertising— Ailene English, Mary-k Wilson Circulation— Michal Alaniz, Nancy Kern, Glenda Sherry, Cathy Snygg, Judy Swinney Production— Karen Barrett, Janice Blue, John Carter, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Barbara Hugetz, Sarah Lees, Cathy Snider Editors-Writers- Sam E.J. Akers, Karen Barrett, Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Barbara Hugetz Office— Janice Blue, Glenda Sherry Photography— Amos Barrow, Jim Caldwell, Marilyn Jones, Nancy Landau Typesetting— Barbara Hugetz, Mary-k Wilson EDITORIAL BOARD Gertrude Barnstone, Janice Blue Gabrielle Cosgriff, Barbara Hugetz Vol. 1, No. 9, November 1976. Houston Breakthrough is published monthly (with the exception of the June-July and the August- September issues) by the Breakthrough Publishing Company, 1708 Rosewood, Houston, Texas 77004, P. O. Box 88072, Houston, Texas 77004. Telephone (713) 526-6686. Subscriptions $5.00 a year. Newsstand 50 cents per copy. This publication is on file at the International Women's History Archive in the Special Collections Library, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60201. wanS^Tsee my A H\C,\4 SCHOOLLETTEH letters to breakthrough Page 2 Houston Breakthrough November 1976 I wish to thank and congratulate Breakthrough for its consistent, thorough and accurate reporting of the University of Texas System School of Nursing dissolution. It is heartening to realize that there is a Houston press, willing and "gutsy" enough to report news when and as it happens. There seems to be no single panacea for the health care delivery problems in this nation, including Texas. However, it is blatantly evident that professional nursing has the skills, knowledge and judgment capabilities for providing additional preventive and curative health care services needed by the American public. However, archaic state medical and nursing laws as well as special interest groups are denying an expanded care role for the professional nurse. Consequently, Texas citizens are denied a healthier tomorrow, perhaps even at an economic savings to the consumer. JOHN LEVIS BROWN Editor, Texas Nursing Austin. TX Attached is a copy of a letter I wrote to Jeff Millar of the Houston Chronicle. It is partly because of articles such as the one you wrote for the Oct. 3 Zest - making a total joke of women's liberation - that many people will continue to glory in their reactionary and disgusting prejudices against women. I gather from your previous columns that you fancy yourself somewhat of a liberal, independent thinking, progressive person. You even admire Kurt Vonnegut! Yet you, along with most every male columnist for the daily press, take glee in reducing the feminist cause to a petty, ridiculous obsession with language - which is exactly what it is NOT. You are poking fun at all women when you write such articles. The job of the women's advocate is to represent all women of the city. By making her every act ridiculous [in your fantasy story] you leave no doubt about your assessment of the mentality of those for whom she advocates. Racism is racism, and it can take the form of racist jokes, such as the recent "joke" by Earl Butz . . . Sexism is sexism, and when it comes, yet again, "humorously" from the pen of a young hypocrite like you it's especially insufferable. JANA PELLUSCH Editor's note: See "DeadPans" this issue, page 11. In reply to Lura Hirsch (October 1976 Breakthrough): It was not my intent, when I submitted the girlie photos from the Port Isabel Press for publication in the Aug-Sept issue of Breakthrough, to please your readers. It was my intent to expose the Press' policy of long standing which considers any issue a complete failure without at least one such photo. Often times there are more than one. I had hoped that your readers would, to some degree, become as incensed over such media policy as I do and feel compelled to issue a formal complaint to the newspaper . . . Readers might be interested to know that the editor of the Port Isabel Press is a woman! When I talked with her on the phone about these girlie pix, she admitted she had been instructed by her predecessor, a male, that Padre Island cheesecake was expected in the Press. She also suggested that I write her a letter to make a formal protest which she could present to the "powers that be". . .Her name is Martha MacClain; she is the editor of the Port Isabel Press, 302 Garcia, Port Isabel, Tx. 78578. Won't you please give me your assistance in eradicating this "long standing policy" by writing to Martha MacClain and register your formal protest? Perhaps then none of us will have to look at any irrelevant girlie photos in our daily newspapers anymore. Breakthrough would be doing its readers a real service if complete information is carried along with any "Dead Pans" exposure. For example, October's issue carried columnist Mike Royko's {Chicago Daily News) insensitive and coarse analysis of wife-beating. You stated this article also appeared in the Houston Chronicle of Sept. 28, 1976. Mike Royko will hear from me, but it would be a big help if complete information were also provided to help readers get right to their pens or typewriters while the wrath is still churning. IDA MORRIS Laguna Vista, TX PS. I thought Karen Barrett's coverage of the anti-abortion assembly was superb. If reprints could somehow be made available, perhaps they could be distributed by your readers to other concerned groups, legislators, etc.? (kHKK IS MY GOSH ARE You SIJLL o 09MRA1NING? / J=tjHuSo OF THE ASSEMBLY.. STATE ARE. ARE WOMEN. / AND OUCE WE EVEN' HAD A WOMAN TREASURER. / WELL. WOMEN SPEND AT LEAST HALF THE MoNf- ■■AND A HAJ.FD6ZEN OR So CiTiES IN CALlFORN/A HAVE WOMEN MAYORS. BUTALL ClTlES ARE FbPltfATEp EQUALLY BY WHAT IS IT *>UPB>PL£ WATfl"? / n* Courtesy, Equal Rights Moni