Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1976
Page 8
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1976 - Page 8. September 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 15, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1930/show/1927.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1976). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1976 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1930/show/1927

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1976 - Page 8, September 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 15, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1930/show/1927.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1976
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date September 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_353h.jpg
Transcript women nave made nistory; they simply have not been given credit for it" g m * Unsung Heroines in American History • EMMA LAZARUS wrote the poem which is inscribed on the Statue of Liberty: "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to brent he free." In the world of SCIENCE: . FLORENCE SABIN, while still a medical student in the 1890's, prepared the first model of the brain stem of a new-born child, a model so exact that it was used in medical schools everywhere. In her first assignment as a professional medical researcher, she cracked the mystery of the function of the lymphatics, a problem that had baffled medical science for 200 years. Invited in 1925 to head the new depart ment of cellular studies of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, Sabin coordinated the study of tuberculosis which laid the groundwork for the disease's control in the 1940s. She was the first woman elected to the prestigious National Academy of Science. In the field of EDUCATION: . MARY McLEOI) BETHUNE, born the first free person in her family, created Bethune-Cookman College and served as its president from 1904 to 1942. She started the college on a dumping ground called "Hells Hole" and raised the down- payment by selling ice cream and sweet potato pie. In time, the college expanded to 27 buildings, a faculty of more than 100, and acquired an "A" rating in the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. In 1933, FDR appointed Bethune to be Director of the Division of Negro Affairs of the National Youth Administration, the first black to hold high federal office. In the course of her life, Bethune never forgot her call to education: "For I am my mothers daughter and the drums of Africa still beat in my heart. They will not let me rest while there is still a single Negro boy or girl without a chance to prove his worth." In the world of POLITICS: • MARGARET BRENT, Maryland landowner, became the first woman in America to ask for the vote and the right to be seated in political office in 1647. She was ejected from a meeting of the colonial assembly for making these demands; she was refused a voice in the affairs of government since "it would set a bad example for ye wives of ye colon v." • 267 years later, JEANNETTE RANKIN, elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Montana, was the first woman to be elected to national office. On her first day in Congress, Woodrow Wilson asked the body to declare war on Germany; in the face of great opposition, Rankin cast her first vote in Congress: "I want to stand by my country but 1 cannot vote for war. 1 vote no/' Near the end of her term she guided the woman's suffrage amendment to victory in the House. In the world of MODERN BUSINESS. • MARY WELLS serves as founder of Wells, Rich, Greene, Inc., one of the country's largest advertising agencies. In April 1966, Wells formed her own agency; within the first six months of operation, the total billings amounted to about $30,000,000. The list is endless. In every field, in every decade,* formidable women have risen above discrimination and "woman's place" to achieve remarkable goals^ Yet despite individual achievement, for the most part the history books continue to recount the records of men. We may well wonder why. In The Women, Yes! (Hecht et al., 1973) several factors are suggested for the unfair treatment of women by the historians. Often women have had the initiative and imagination to found new institutions or to organize movements only to discover that this male-oriented society required that the women step back and give titular leadership to men. The U.S. Sanitary Commission is a case in point. It was organized and operated by women during the Civil WTar to care for wounded soldiers. Yet its first president was Henry W. Bellows, "a Unitarian clergyman who could provide the male prestige that was thought necessary/' _ A second factor is the fact that this country's formal history emphasizes war and military leaders. Therefore, "William T. Sherman, who burned his way through Georgia, is in the Hall of Fame: Clara Barton, who helped clean up the mess, is not." Finally, we must remember that most historians have been male. In every field, male authorities have been quoted and acclaimed; female authorities have been largely ignored. But we must not take thrs documentary omission for lack of action or lack of imagination on the part of our foremothers. As the authors of The Women, Yes! tell us, "Women have made history; they simply have not been given credit for it." As a result, part of the effort before us as we begin the third century as a nation is to discover our female heritage. Until we do, any history of the U.S. must remain misshapen and ill-informed. JOIN N.O.W.: Clip and mail with your check, to : Marjorie Randal, 1922 Redway, Houston 77062. I would like to "become a member of Bay Area N.O.W. and National N.O.W, ($15) I want to Join, but can only afford $ . I am not a member, but would like to receive the NEWSLETTER for a year. ($4) I would like to make a contribution of $ to N.O.W. As a N.O.W. member, I authorize my name and address to be published on chapter roster. NAME Home Phone Other Phone ADDRESS City and Zip Occupation and Employer Interests and/or skills which I can contribute to Bay Area N.O.W. projects: Criticism of Bay Area N.O.W.fs program, organization, goals: