Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1976
Page 6
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1976 - Page 6. September 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 7, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1930/show/1925.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1976). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1976 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1930/show/1925

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1976 - Page 6, September 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 7, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1930/show/1925.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1976
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date September 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_353f.jpg
Transcript Interesting Reading...review by Becky Christman As I read Jo Freeman's book, The Politics of Women's Liberation, I began to see my own participation in the movement in a perspective not available to me before. Many questions I had were discussed and, for some, I even found answers! The subtitle, a. case study of an emerging; social movement and its relation to the policy process succinctly describes the scope of the book, originally a doctoral tnesis. ,s. Freeman was personally involved in tne women's movement from 1967-69. In the years between 1970-74, she followed the movement through friends, traveling, lecturing, and publications. So, she writes from the benefit of this double experience. After describing the dynamics which operated to originate the movement in the '60's, she goes on to tell about the various types of organizations, how they differ and how, in spite of differences, they or we work together. The history of NOW is presented and then the other smaller groups are described along with the important functions they have performed, and continue to carry out. The latter part of the book is devoted to the relationship of the movement zo public policy. Ms. Freeman notes with us that this aspect is complex and ongoing. She compares the women's movement to the civil rights movement and notes that in matters of equal opportunity for women the federal bureaucracy has moved more quickly than was the case regarding minorities. She sees the national women's organizations such as NOW as currently viable influences on public policy. It seems to me that this book is worthwhile reading tor all feminists because it is written by a feminist and gives us a view of our recent history and an all-important political analysis. At the end of the book there is an excellent bibliography entitled "publish women or perish," along with footnotes suggesting all kinds of additional reading. Author ell Rape Crisis Task Force Task Force sponsored training for rape victim advocates will begin in October. To inquire about schedule, call Help Line (488-7222) or Evie Whitsett (488-1777). The Task Force also provides opportunities for participants to do public education work on this subject, or to work on publicity. Interested people are invited to attend a Planning Meeting on September 22, at 8 pm. Check with Evie for location. Susan Brownmiller - Right Again In Brownmiller's Against Our Will: Men,.Women, and Rape, there is a chapter titled "The Myth of the Heroic Rapist" which examines the glorification of Jack the Ripper by male writers, reporters, and critics. "Jack the Ripper's grip on the masculine imagination is so,out of proportion to the case of an unknown man who stalked, mutilated and murdered five prostitutes in London's nast End in the autumn of 1888 that we must wonder precisely what his attraction holds," says Brownmiller. Her quote from Colin Wilson offers a clue: "The sexual act has a close affinity with murder...Murderer and victim are in the same sort of relation as the male penetrating the female." The item opposite (Houston Post, 7/25/76) was headlined "Author claims Victorian conspiracy in Jack the Ripper investigation" and offers an elaborate theory that Jack "was a conspiracy at a very high level, a sort of Victorian Watergate in which the cover-up succeeded." Note the lyrical joy in the opening lines. Chicago Tribune Service LONDON - Jack the Ripper, that midnight slasher of 19th Century prostitutes, long has been the world's most captivating killer. He has become the very epitome of the homicidal maniac, the untraceable murderer who killed for his own demented kind of fun, terrorizing the population and gleefully taunting the police with his successes. He has been made the subject of song, movies, prose, poetry and even children's rhymes. He was never caught, and despite hundreds of attempts he never has been convincingly identified. But now there is a new theory of Jack the Ripper, one that advances him from