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Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1973
Page 4
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Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1973 - Page 4. June 1973. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1914/show/1909.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1973). Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1973 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1914/show/1909

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1973 - Page 4, June 1973, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1914/show/1909.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1973
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date June 1973
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1439 .H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Item Description
Title Page 4
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_076d.jpg
Transcript Page 4 BROADSIDE **** ************ LETTER/ TO *************** •**********•••* THE EDITOR ***** ******* As new members, we would like to point out a need for a welcoming of new members. We have sat by and observed at two meetings now, and have met no one. There is a cliquish and cool atmosphere, one not conducive to making sisters feel welcome. We both have enough confidence in ourselves not to let this deter us from the meetings. However, not all new members feel this way. Some are looking for sisterhood, enthusiasm, and support for their ideas. When one does not feel comfortable and accepted, one cannot express herself as freely. It appears that some changes could be made in this area. We do want to improve active membership. Don't we? Sincerely, Two Concerned Sisters, Peggy Kirkendall Peggy Chi 1 dress O I, as well as several other members I have talked to, resent the article entitled "Is Revolution N6W?" published in the April Broad- ■ side. I resent the title, the tone, and the implications of the article. The article is critical of NOW's emphasis on equality with men and on women's integration into the current society. This I consider to be one of NOW's most important attitudes, especially since this emphasis goes further than the article implies. We want more than jast integration and equality. NOW feels that no person should be stereotyped in any way because of her or his sex, any more than because of her or his race, color, national origin, or sexual preference. NOW wants every individual human, whether female or male, to have the opportunity to develop that person's full potential. Why should women want an "autonomous culture and politics"? The finest culture and society is that one which welcomes diversity and encourages the development of the individual talents of all the members of that society. Besides, what about our brothers who are also stereotyped? Many men are not allowed to develop freely. Do we turn our backs on almost half of the human race? The article criticizes NOW for working within the current political and legal system and especially criticizes Wilma Scott Heide for having the gall to point .out that NOW needs money to accomplish its goals. Well, what are we supposed to do? Take up guns and kill off the entire political and economic leadership of the United States? (And, I suppose, steal or borrow the guns -- we certainly shouldn't pay for them.) The article concedes that NOW "may" be able to accomplish more than the so-called "radical feminist" groups. NOW already has accomplished more. NOW, by working within the current system, is helping to change that system. NOW is helping to create a whole new society, and is using the tactics which will accomplish real and lasting change. However, to carry out court actions, to lobby, to publicize our causes in the mass media, to form women's centers, and even to gather and to print information which people want and need, we must have money, as well as time and energy. As KNOW, INC., points out, "Freedom isn't.free!" But the article's real criticism is that NOW will nU concentrate on the economic system. NOW will not say that all the problems of our society are derived form the United States' capitalist system. And the author (s?) is right. We won't. . Because sexism is NOT a resultof a specific type of economic system. Discrimination on the basis of sex is found in all industrialized and in most non-industrialized societies. Socialist, Communist, and Fascist states discriminate against women too. Political and economic leadership positions in aJN_ the industrialized countries are dominated o- verwhelmingly by men. Sexism is a cultural disease. All women in the United States are discriminated against; rich women, poor women, working class women, middle-class women, upper-class women, black women, white women, brown women, red women, yellow women. The direct results of that June 1973 discrimination vary from individual to individual, but the fight against sexism is NOT a "class struggle." To think that way is to think in a narrow, rigid manner which allows one to^- see and understand only a portion of the world. NOW is fomenting a revolution, in the Random House dictionary sense cf "a radical and pervasive change in society and the social structure." NOW is doing this through methods that work. "And NOW is flexible e- nough to develop new tactics and approaches when the old ones don't work. That is how one WINS a revolution; Betty A. Barnes PS: I object to the original article being published in the Broadside. For outsiders who apparently neither understand nor share NOW's goals to be given a large space in our newsletter to criticize us seems in very poor taste. Maybe next time the Broadside can publish an article by the "Right-to-Lifers" against abortion? Betty A. Barnes EDITOR'S NOTE: The original article was first printed in off our backs, April, 1973. The Broadside - welcomes articles presenting all points of view so that we may know what the other side thinks. I am not a member of NOW but have been receiving the Broadside as a follow-up to one of your meetings. I found the last issue particularly interesting, specifically the article by Ms. Moore, an extraordinarily lucid and well- reasoned treatment of this culture's peculiar attitudes toward lesbianism (and, I might add, homosexuality in general.) How much grief and confusion we might save our? selves if we could accept loving behavior simply as the way people behave when they love each other. Wendy Yingling