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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 12, No. 9, September 1984
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 12, No. 9, September 1984 - Page 8. September 1984. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1700/show/1695.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1984). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 12, No. 9, September 1984 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1700/show/1695

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 12, No. 9, September 1984 - Page 8, September 1984, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1700/show/1695.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 12, No. 9, September 1984
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date September 1984
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 8
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File Name femin_201109_280h.jpg
Transcript CURING femininity By WRAY HERBERT SCIENCE NEWS, VOL. 124 SEPTEMBER 10,1983 Consider a psychological interview in which an adult male reports these personality traits: He puts work and career above personal relationships, travels a lot and works long hours; he makes career decisions (relocating, for example) without considering others' needs; he passively allows others to take responsibility for much of his social life because he is unable to express emotions. How would he be diagnosed? He might, according to Rutgers University psychologist Marcie Kaplan, be diagnosed as suffering from Independent Personality Disorder. He might, but he wouldn't, because there is no such thing as Independent Personality Disorder; instead, he would most likely be viewed as typically male and left undiagnosed. In contrast, Kaplan says, a healthy adult woman who shows up in the clinic with personality traits considered typically female would automatically earn a diagnosis — most likely Dependent Personality Disorder—and be labeled sick and in need of treatment. Writing in the July American Psychologist, Kaplan takes on an enduring question — why are more women than men treated for psychiatric*" disorders? — and she answers it by arguing that the very rules of diagnosis, as codified in the so- called DSM 111, the bible of psychiatric diagnosis, are stacked against women. The male-dominated committees that wrote the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, she says, have arbitrarily defined what is maladaptive, so that healthy feminine attitudes and behaviors (or what are stereo- typically viewed as feminine attitudes and behaviors) match those that are officially psychopathological. Several theories have been put forth to explain why women are more frequently diagnosed as mentally ill. It has been suggested that women are more willing than men to express symptoms, so that they are been suggested that there is indeed more mental illness among women — that because of their underprivileged position in society women are at greater risk for emotional disturbance. But the most convincing theory, Kaplan argues, is that women are diagnosed as mentally ill both for overconforming and for underconforming to female stereotypes. According to several studies of therapists' attitudes, Kaplan notes, most therapists have the same criteria for healthy men and for healthy adults, but they tend to use different criteria in defining healthy women; the typical psychologically healthy woman is more submissive, less independent, less aggressive, more emotional and more emotionally expressive, more excitable and more concerned about appearance. If a woman rejects this stereotype, she is an unhealthy woman; if she conforms to it, she is an unhealthy adult, as defined in several parts of the DSM HI. The part of the diagnostic manual most heavily stacked against women is the chapter on personality disorders, Kaplan claims. Histrionic Personality Disorder (what use to be called hysteria) is defined by the presence of self-dramatization, overreaction, irrational and angry outbursts, vanity and dependence — traits that, Kaplan notes, are not all that different from those of the female stereotype. Similarly, Dependent Personality Disorder is defined by characteristics that echo the clinicians' ideal of a healthy woman — passivity and a tendency to subordinate one's needs to the needs of others. Someone with this personality disorder, the DSM 111 says for example, might tolerate an abusive spouse. But the manual ignores the dependency of people —usually men, Kaplan argues — who rely on others to maintain their houses and raise their children, or of those people — again usually men — who remarry only to replace the original caretaker. "In short," Kaplan con cludes, "men's dependency, like women's dependency, exists and is supported and sanctioned by society; but men's dependency is not labeled as such, and men's dependency is not considered sick, whereas women's dependency is." To make her point, Kaplan invented two fictitious personality disorders based on stereotypically male traits: Independent Personality Disorder, described earlier, and Restricted Personality Disorder, which is defined by such traits as appearance of self-assurance, limited emotional expression, resistance to answering others' emotional needs and stoicism. Without these diagnostic categories, Kaplan says, a male with such traits — the counterparts of histrionics and dependency in women — would go undiagnosed and untreated. "Masculinity alone is not clinically suspect;" she concludes, "femininity alone is." REMEMBER, Your ad, business card, comments can be right here for all members and supporters to read. Check the program meeting for rates and details. Inexpensive and very worthwhile.