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Houston Breakthrough, November 1979
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Houston Breakthrough, November 1979 - Page 29. November 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 26, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1660/show/1656.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1979). Houston Breakthrough, November 1979 - Page 29. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1660/show/1656

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, November 1979 - Page 29, November 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 26, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1660/show/1656.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, November 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 29
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_555bb.jpg
Transcript "Give sorrow words // SORROW WORDS, Man lillctt. Grove Pi Reviewed by Joseph Patrick Kenned) prison - the final variations of nada mas. It was a scenario that she enacted time and time again. Making the rounds in Zi- huatanejo, Acapulco, Oaxaca and Mexico City she found time for her letter to "E". Her very first in this volume sets the tone. "Had been going to write you ebullient sex letter intermixed with poetic episte- mological reflections on being reborn in the crater of civilization but I actually fucked him this afternoon and it was grubby and banal, as you always knew." For awhile, she enjoyed the distinction of the writer in Mexico, the freedom and cafe con leche status it afforded a woman sitting alone in those small cafes. She had published film and art criticism and had been an instructor in English before her termination. Her dismissal was the recurrent voice of rejection. It was off to Mexico. "Failure at work transmuted itself into sex and failure at sex transmutes into pain at failure at work." The letters of Part One were apparently written during the spring and summer of 1976 and are published in toto. Letters in Part Two are edited by Edith Jones from about 1000 pages sent to her by Maryse during her second stay in Mexico in 1977. Edith Jones provides a welcome insight (p. 177) into Maryse Holder's quixotic return to Mexico. It is the first time that Edith Jones seems tangible. Finally, in the epilogue of Selma Yampolsky, we have the testimony of friend and kindred spirit. The Epilogue is essential reading and should have been developed and a- dapted as an introduction. This book wold have been considerably improved by an extensive introduction by one who knew Maryse Holder. The introduction by Kate Millett appears as a commercial carrier here. The problems of Maryse Holder began shortly after she was born in France. When she was about two years old, her mother was taken from her forever, ap- ters froth S10.00. introduction bv parently murdered by the Nazis. Much of her young childhood and later life was spent longing for her mother. She and her Jewish father were fugitives from Nazi terror. Eventually, she came to the U- nited States. Perhaps, the most evident scar was a partial facial paralysis, the apparent result of surgical injury during the treatment, of mastoiditis. The latter was a devastating trauma. The illusion of personal beauty was destroyed. She was ugly, or so she thought. Perhaps, this affliction was an incipient nemesis of the sustaining self. As a literate being she found substance in the * writings of Jean Rhys, pleasure in the haunting characters of Tennessee Williams and more than color in The Yellow Wallpaper of Charlotte Perkins Gilman. She found temporary passage with Caste- nada, until he reduced it all to pure potency. It was, however, a book of Oscar Lewis' which she read and reread as she deciphered the heirs of The Children of Sanchez. She had wanted to write her dissertation on Flaubert. L Education sentiment ale was the only novel she respected. In my judgement, Maryse Holder belongs to no generic movement. Perhaps, she was a victim of the predatory male, a feminist martyr as suggested by Kate Millet. Perhaps, she was a victim of a self congenitally endowed for independent self-destruction in New York, Mexico or wherever, as her letters suggest. Some will see literary affinities with those who have dared - George Sand, Henry Miller, William Burroughs, Erica Jong and others. Her capacity for self-abuse was enormous, but whatever her achievements or imperfections, her letters to "E" are now letters to you and me - hopefully, compassionate respondents. Dr. Joseph Patrick Kennedy is a writer living in Houston. ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo Elect HERMAN LAUHOFF Voted for ERA and women's rights Three terms in the legislature Councilman, District H Paid for 1 campaign, S^vl^^f^^o^^rTYn^ Barthelme-Moore Associates Advertising and Marketing a full-service advertising agency since 1960 Helen Moore Barthelme Odell Pauline Moore 1110 Lovett Blvd., Suite 100 Houston, Texas 77006 713/521-9214 Toiletries Books Incense Bath salts Feast Nuts Herbs Fruit Cider •4> Natural Food Store and New Dell ' 'Create a personalized Christmas Basket 3827 Duniavy as an inexpensive gift!' 528-8905 NOVEMBER 1979' 29 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH