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Houston Breakthrough, November 1979
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Houston Breakthrough, November 1979 - Page 28. November 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 26, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1660/show/1655.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1979). Houston Breakthrough, November 1979 - Page 28. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1660/show/1655

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, November 1979 - Page 28, November 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 26, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1660/show/1655.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, November 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 28
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_555ba.jpg
Transcript PLUPERFECT *(ploo pur'fikt) adj. more than perfect Houston's newest and most exciting condominium home experience is ready and receiving home buyers. You are invited into a world of fine quality located amidst exceptional shops and restaurants in the Westheimer corridor. Come to River Stone. It's Fashionable . . . Prestigious. . . Contemporary. . . Casual . . . Exciting Low 40's to mid-60's River Stone us-Home 6.4 miles west of the Galleria on Westheimer, then left on Walnut Bend in the West Chase area. 781-8701 What Equal Housing Means to You RIVER STONE, IN COOPERATION WITH U. S. HOME MORTGAGE CO., IS LEADING THE WAY FOR CAREER WOMEN AND UNMARRIED COUPLES TO OWN THEIR OWN CONDOMINIUM HOMES. 95% FINANCING WITH $450 CLOSING COST IS AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED PURCHASERS REGARDLESS OF SEX. Serving the Greater Houston Community With Quality... LEISURE LEARNING UNLIMITED No Matter What's Your Bag: Dance, Drama, Music, Business, Sports Of All Sorts, Languages, Art, Cooking or Personal Development. In our November-December schedule, which you can receive by calling 721-7299, we offer a wide variety of classes. Some classes are free and registration is easy. HKG: Didn't you think that the Harmonetics Society had a materialistic base? It really wasn't all that spiritual when you got right down to it. GH: But think of all the other cults. Let's take any cult that exists now that's fairly well known, est grows and grows. You pay $350 to go and be screamed at for a weekend. Now, let's say 80 people come in to be screamed at; think how much money is being collected. When you go into advanced est you pay $750. Then you go into 'hunger,' which is a new thing they've got, and you pay more money. And you go on and on. They never release you, because they can still get more money out of you. HKG: They've really got people out recruiting, too. GH: Yes, in the Hari Krishnas, in the Moonies, there are, just as in the Harmonetics Society, the missionaries on the street. They're soliciting money for whom? Not for themselves, but for the society, and does Dr. Moon give all that money away? HKG: You talk about 'cults.' I hear the term bandied about a lot. It seems to be the way people describe anything that's not the traditional, orthodox religion. GH: That is true in a certain way. 'Cult' has a pejorative meaning, because a leader can get rich from it. If a nun gives away all her worldly property, it doesn't go to make some bishop richer. But in a cult, the leader, or the leader and his disciples, may be living awfully well; and no one knows where the money is going. . . [Yet many people] follow a leader that many of us can see as not very charitable and fairly selfish. HKG: But aren't you talking about people who want easy answers? 'Follow these rules.' GH: That's true of most people. I ran into a friend who is extremely bright, who has been into Transcendental Meditation. Now he's into est, and so is his wife. He is clever, amusing, charming—and he's a believer. I have another friend who rushes over with every new book that offers answers. 'Is There Life After Death?' She rushes to give it to me. 'You have to read it,' she says, so I will find out, too. I don't think people will ever stop searching for those answers and [yet] very seldom is an answer permanent to them. HKG: The Harmonetics Investigation seems a very definite general audience suspense book. Are you a reader of thrillers? GH: I've read a lot of Agatha Christie. I don't like most of the suspense of today. Of the positive suspense novels there has only been one that has come out in the last few months that I've enjoyed and that has been Shibumi, with its Japanese background. I'm not a Robert Ludlum fan, and I'm not a James Bond fan, particularly. I do like suspense, yes, but I'd say most of it is too outlandish today. It's formula. HKG: When you set out to write this book, did you have any kind of model or a favorite author in mind? GH: Well, I like Doris Lessing, I like Marcel Proust and I like Tom Wolfe, but I didn't have an author in mind. No, I didn't write like any of them. I just thought I was going to write about a sect or cult. I knew my main characters; and I knew how it was going to start, how it was going to end, and some vivid scenes in the middle. I made the women in the book the major protagonists. It just happened that way. HKG: Speaking of your main character, how did you come up with the name Jade? It's a very unusual name. As a word it's been used as a sort of derogative epithet for women. GH: I never thought of that. A jade, but that's almost eighteenth century. I was thinking more like what a westside mother would name her daughter. HKG: That's where you got the name? GH: It could have been Kimberley. "Give sorrow words..." is a quotation from Macbeth, but the letters of Maryse Holder are from life. It was the life of an amatory spirit, adrift without the parental buoys of approval, self-reliance or self- esteem, reveling in pernicious desire, candor and charity foreign to survival in a land of live and take. She was a fragile lemming, marching to the suicidal, sexual seas of Mexico, a gringa who loved the tan bodies of Mexican men, suffering the abuse, but always directing her fatal march, cognizant, but unrestrained by the male culture. For Maryse Holder, death was a way of life. She was 36 when she was murdered in Mexico City. After a short distance into this posthumous publication one knows it will not end well and seeks cause. She was an intelligent and singular correspondent, dispatching installments of the self-destruction of a tragic and malnourished heart, an amanuensis of desire in search of the executioner. Perhaps, she approached sustenance for a time in Mexico and in her writing to confidant, Edith Jones, in New York. It is in the writing that the unattainable is given form. Here is the substance of an artistic movie. The disappointments, the discourtesy, the incredible lack of compassion, the insults to body and mind, the visceral and sexual stimulation are recorded here with an integrity that may not be palatable to some readers. These are not bucolic letters of the Mexican countryside, but sensuous and sexual epistles on the complexities of being. Here are ad libidum couplings with Miguel, Andres, Mario, Lucio, Ri- cardo, Emilio or whomever, seeking and teaching, loving and leaving, the mechanics of the piston and the ring, the expectation that one of them might care e- nough, the harsh realities of broken rendezvous, insatiate sex, unfulfilled promises, rejection and solitude, drinking, drugs, HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 28 NOVEMBER 1979