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Houston Breakthrough, October 1980
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Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 20. October 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1580.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1980). Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 20. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1580

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 20, October 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1580.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, October 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 20
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_564q.jpg
Transcript WHY ME? Battering happens to all classes of women at every level of society. ■ BY TOBY MYERS AND BURNET OLIVEROS - An interview with Lenore Walker by Toby Myers and Burnet Oliveros. Lenore Walker is associate professor of psychology at Colorado Women's College, director of the Domestic Violence Institute in Denver, author of The Battered Woman, and mother of a son and a daughter. Toby Myers is associate professor of child development and family living at Texas Woman's University Houston Center. Her interest in family violence stems from personal experience. She is one of the founders of the Houston . Area Women's Center Shelter and of the Texas Council on Family Violence. She is the mother of a daughter and two sons. Burnet Oliveros was a battered wife from the age of 19 until she was 29. She has been free for seven years. She is a mathematician and a geophysicist, p mother of three daughters, and a member of the board of directors of the Houston Area Women's Center. She has been working with their Shelter for Battered Women since its founding two years ago. Lenore Walker, author of The Battered Woman. Burnet Oliveros: You've been doing research on battered women; I'd like to hear about that first. Lenore Walker: We've collected information on 435 women over the last year and a half. Most of the women are from the Denver area. They are self-identified as battered women, but they have to meet certain criteria, (such as) they have to have been abused at least twice. When we're finished, we're going to be able to talk about characteristics-sociological, demographic and psychological characteristics of the women. Toby Myers: How did these women come to you? Walker: Many of the women are self-referred (which means they did the calling in); many are referred from other sources. In addition to newspapers, television shows and mental health centers, we put up notices in the bathrooms of companies and in the airport. Oliveros: Were these women still in a battering situation? Walker: No, as a matter of fact, only about a quarter of our women were still in at the time of the interview. Oliveros: What kinds of things are you learning? Walker: I can only tell you our preliminary findings-that battering occurs across all socioeconomic levels, all educational levels. We had a high percentage of professional women in our sample. Oliveros: Is there a particular type of person who is likely to be a battered woman? Intellectually, I reject the idea, and yet when I meet other women who have been battered, I feel an immediate closeness. I don't know if it's the same kind of thing fellow survivors of a hurricane feel or what it is. Walker: That's a question that's really hard to answer. I have to answer that question through my clinical impressions and not through the research data. Clinically, battered women change so quickly once they begin to regain a support system-once they begin to move back into the world and become free of the batterer- that it doesn't make clinical sense to say they have some kind of preexisting condition that made them more likely to get into a battering relationship. I'm not willing to say that totally, because there may be a vulnerability, a kind of conditioning that occurs in childhood for some women so that when they meet up with a batterer, probably accidently, they, then, are more vulnerable to the maintenance of the relationship. One thing battered women have that nobody's given them sufficient credit for, is the skill to stay alive. The more interviews I do, the more I wonder, how come they haven't died. I think that the woman recognized the fact that, yes, she's still getting beaten, and, yes, she can't control that, but she's not getting killed. Every battered woman always says: "Thank God, it's over. It could have been worse." No matter how bad it is, she always THE BOOKSTORE r 1^28 Bissonnet • Houston 77005 • Fine feminist books and magazines including Heresies, Chrysalis, Woman Spirit and Women Artists News /QU^sA^*^ tfy1 20 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH