Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough, October 1980
Page 19
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 19. October 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1579.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1980). Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 19. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1579

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 19, October 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1579.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, October 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 19
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_564p.jpg
Transcript CAM choreographers who danced downtown and through the tunnels. The dancing was structural improvisation, that is, the dancers used their surroundings to feed them movement phrases designed to interact with their environment, and ideally, their audience. This was an experiment that CAM choreographers hoped would reach the business community audience. Unfortunately, this didn't happen, as Farrel Dyde, once a CAM choreographer recalled, "We had to put out a tremendous amount of energy to compete with the buildings; it was a fatiguing and antagonistic experience because it was as though we were dancing against all of what these businessmen believed." The CAM choreographers failed to attract a less alienated modern dance audience, but it did lay down the foundation from which MDC would eventually spring —it briefly united Houston's contemporary dance artists. Farrel Dyde has fonder memories of that aspect, "It was very stimulating to present your work before your peers. There was an exchange of ideas, an interaction, I haven't seen since." CAM choreographers lasted for two years, and the list of the choreographers reads like the who's who of the Houston modern dance scene: James Clouser, Farrel Dyde, Mary Wolff, Sandra York, Polly Motley, and Roberta Stokes. The project's guest choreographers were Beverly Cook and Janis Simonds. MDC's schedule of coming events indicates their tactics of reaching an audience will differ from those attempted by the CAM. Working on one level of the problem, the alienation Houston modern dancers feel from each other, MDC will present an all-day improvisation session at the University of Houston at Clear Lake City on October 11. Roberta Stokes encourages local contemporary dance artists to surface for the event. In January MDC will sponsor a dance gathering open to the public which will provide the audience with a one day sweeping glimpse of several local modern dance groups. Concentrating on the education of an audience, MDC will present two evening shows at Rice Media Center in February. The first evening will consist of dance history films, with the second evening devoted to avant garde films and a lecture- demonstration. MDC's most impressive scheduled Roberta Stokes is one of the founders of the Modern Dance Council. zation for her or his fantasies. For example, seeing someone run in place for five minutes on stage does not appear to be a significant piece of art, even if the choreographer's intention was to exemplify the speed at which we move through modern life. Intention is not enough. Watching such a piece is boring and it seems trite. Usually, artists who have been told that few understand their art, respond as though they have transcended to the "BE-yond," and they have an elitist attitude regarding the abstract nature of their work. Clouser, the choreographer for Space/ Dance/Theater (S/D/T), on the other hand, is working on a unique grass roots level approach to attract a modern dance audience. Instead of insisting that his audience come to him, he's going to them—in gymnasiums, basketball courts, public Humphrey Foundation. But since there are no funds for a board of directors or administrator, the company handles these tasks cooperatively. When S/D/T began, its purpose was unclear, except, Clouser himself admits, as a vehicle for his art. However, since the birth of his son three years ago, Clouser began to think about Houston's future, "Houston is in danger of choking itself to death. The number of parks is not growing, there is more violence, and not enough free, safe, attractive, cultural enrichment. People are cut off from everything. Houston could be an open city." He continued, "We [in S/D/T] see ourselves as a service organization to get people to realize the vital things in this city." Clouser's realization that as an artist, he must also be an activist, is a far cry from the elitism in modern dance of previous years. His grass roots approach, (significantly used by social service organizations in the last 10 years, and much more recently in the arts), has never before been tried in Houston with such a full-force effort. In the end, for this outreach to be successful, the artists must offer something to the developing modern dance audience in return for time or money spent. The audience must leave a performance with a sense of enrichment, whether through shocking innovation or simply pleasure. These works should communicate and be relevant to an audience. And although the success of other forms of dance may indicate a ripe climate for modern dance in Houston, it still seems dancers will have to meet the public more than half-way. There are dances performed here that just can't be done in New York ... event will be a combination choreographers workshop and panel discussion held in the spring, open to the public. The discussion will be over the artists', critics', and audience's roles. MDC puts responsibility on the modern dancer to clarify and advocate his or her art form, and bring audience and artist closer together. James Clouser, former artistic director of the Houston Ballet, in explaining his journey from ballet to modern, remarked, "I rebel against modern dancers, too. They get so esoteric and self-conscious that they don't communicate to anybody. And audiences are small because of it." Audiences are frustrated, especially in these times, to pay to see a dance concert so esoteric and self-indulgent. They feel as though the artist is asking for subsidi- schools, parks, or any local facility easily accessible to people in their own community. Clouser wants to reach people who either won't or can't come into the theatre, and he plans to visit homes for the handicapped and aged, as well as 137 housing projects. Many of the pieces in S/D/T's repertory are designed to be performed in non-theatrical spaces. S/D/T will spend the fall making visits throughout the city, and use the summer for performances at Miller Theater. In recent years, the Miller Theater performances have been generously funded by the Cultural Arts Council of Houston, and S/D/T's past and present funding record looks good; it has also received support from the Moody Foundation, the Texas Commission on the Arts, and the SDT's James Clouser is working on a grass roots approach to attract a modern dance audience OCTOBER 1980 19