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Houston Breakthrough, October 1980
Page 17
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Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 17. October 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1577.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1980). Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 17. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1577

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 17, October 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1577.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, October 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 17
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_564n.jpg
Transcript SWAMP FEVER Breaking down the loneliness of the independent filmmaker. .BY JANE COLLINGS. When is a SWAMP not a swamp? When it's the South West Alternate Media Project. Southwest is a key word. It's part of a national network to develop media participation on a regional basis. Tom Sims, assistant director of SWAMP calls it "a spin-off from the Rice University Media Center." A conflict fermented within the Media Center in the late 70's over its future direction: was it to be a film program strictly for Rice University students or would it be a community media center. Or both? The resolution was to continue the community access program through SWAMP-and so it took its offices off campus, in the upstairs of a garage apartment across the street from the Rothko Chapel. It's an informal setting from which you can rent film- and video- making equipment cheap. Canon and GAF Super 8 cameras for $4 a day, tripods and light kits for $4 a day, mikes at $3 a day and % inch portable video production units at $3 an hour or $15 a day. You must pay an initial $10 membership fee. They also have 8 mm and 16 mm projectors and editing facilities. If you don't want to make films you could always just watch them. Carefully filed in a big wooden box is a collection of some important avant-garde works. Meshes of the Afternoon, by Maya Deren; Touching, by Paul Sharits; Window Water Baby Moving and others by Stan Brakhage are only a few. The public is invited to see these films on an informal basis (set up the projector and turn off the light). It's the only place in Houston for experimental films. SWAMP also has access to grant money. Applications are flooding in for a $30,000 production fund to be allocated this fall. Awards of varying amounts will be given to independent Southwest film and video makers. "We find people here are doing a kind of film we didn't even know about! And these people, the people who are really committed to the idea of making a film have something unusual to say," says Sims. SWAMP does not have satellite access facilities yet. However, they do show films made by southwest independents on Territory, a television program aired at 10:30 on Monday night on KUHT-TV. Says Sims: "On Territory there isn't a form or genre we haven't put on—documentary, narrative, experimental, animation—and even things that don't fit into any of those categories. The weekly program has been running for five years and represents a very rare opportunity for a regional film or video maker to broadcast to a mass audience. "The beauty of Houston," states Guillermo Pulido, an artist from California working here, "is that you can approach the people who make programming decisions and simply say, 'I want something put on the air,' and they do it." The existence of such public access demonstrates how wide-open the possibilities are in a developing center like SWAMP. "Texas film and video is less like-minded [than in other areas], exceptional when banded together," says Pulido. In the loosely-knit film world here there is room for fresh and original ideas to grow whereas cohesive groups tend to adopt one theory and ignore other possibilities, he feels. Some people, however, think that the Houston film community is too loosely knit. "Right now in Houston," says Helen Foley, a local filmmaker, "you work in absolute isolation." What seems to be lacking in the city are informal screenings of current local work. It would be an opportunity for filmmakers to get together, discuss each other's ideas—add fuel to the firel "We're training filmmakers to make films they watch themselves, then put away in the closet," says Ed Hugetz, the director of SWAMP. A filmmaker himself, Hugetz identifies with the "isolation" of the independent. "In our culture the ultimate test is facing people. It's no good to produce stuff if people don't see it, if you can't share with them what you believe and listen to their challenges. This is something we at SWAMP must work out or this whole business of independent media is a farce." All in the SWAMP family (seated) Fletcher Mackey, Don Quaintance, Tom Sims and (standing) Tina Brawner, John Techman, and Laurie McDonald. OCTOBER 1980 17