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Houston Breakthrough, October 1980
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Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 16. October 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1576.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1980). Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 16. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1576

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 16, October 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1576.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, October 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 16
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File Name femin_201109_564m.jpg
Transcript ^N. (c) New Yorker, 1980. program this fall is a staple diet of films by Hitchcock, Teshigahara, Eisenstein, Vertov, Blue, Vigo, Clair, Bresson, and Renoir. And you'll be glad to know, if you haven't been there lately, the director chairs have been replaced by ordinary theater seats except for the first six rows. So get there early. Experimental films make one lonely appearance on the Rice scene via Wille Varela, an independent Super 8 artist currently working in El Paso. He considers himself to be a "lover of film." Of his work he comments: "My films are there to help us see the world in a way we haven't seen before." Over at the Greenway you get everything from pasta to borscht. They show almost entirely foreign films which don't cessful because it had been nominated for an Academy Award and it had Ingrid Bergman." says Buck. The Tin Drum, nominated for best foreign film last year, just finished a 12-week run. "We had a film called Northern Lights, I thought it was a very good film. It was the true story of the formation of a labour progressive party in North Dakota. We had to pull it after one week," recalls Buck. "La Cage aux Folles has been running 48 weeks, so I'd say it's the most popular film we've ever had here. It touches people, it's a good cross between comedy and pathos. It's a very funny movie and people need something to laugh at nowadays. It really draws on holidays." "It is ridiculous that La Cage has been The museum film series is the most adventurous because it is the least commercially dependent."—Eric Gerber get a lot of exposure in Houston. Milburn hates going underground to see a film. "It's like exploring a cave," he says. But "our attendance has been incredible," boasts Steve Buck, manager of the Greenway. "I think it's a growth in taste. There was a time in Houston when foreign movies meant dirty movies, sex movies." How does Buck decide what films to order? "I have a well-used ouija board," he laughs. "What I book is based on how it opens in New York. If it's a smash hit in New York, then there's a good chance it will take off in Houston." Buck finds that the audience here is attracted to films with a pedigree. "Bergman's Autumn Sonata, a very heavy film, was suc- tying up one screen for 12 months. And since they have three screens," asks Mil- burn, "why not change one every day?" Buck has his reasons for the long haul: "We are doing so well with La Cage that economically we cannot justify taking it off. In our contract with the distributors we have a hold-over clause. If a film grosses such and such a figure we are obligated to continue running it. Success breeds this," he says matter-of-factly. "I feel a sense of responsibility as a contributor to film culture in Houston," says Buck. "And right now I can bring in what I want. We've built up a real trust with a group of regulars, and we have customers suggesting films for us to screen here," says Buck of the present-day situ ation at his theatre. "But," he continues, "We're getting to a point where the theatre is so profitable that we won't be able to afford to take risks with obscure films." "Houston is changing," says Gerber. "Years ago the Greenway was losing money. In desperation they decided to fill the gap left by the Alray, an avant- garde film house that had gone out of business. Their success was a surprise to everyone. But don't look to the Greenway 3 or River Oaks for adventurous programming. Thev've staked out their territory, they cater lo the aopetite of an established audience." "The first year the River Oaks was open I went there a lot," recalls Milburn. "But now they tend to repeat themselves and are not exploring any new horizons. Occasionally, they do, and when they do explore it is worthwhile, but they have found the formula to draw an audience and they follow it." For a large number of Houstonians the formula must work. Even on a Monday night the place is packed; the lobby crowded with chic T-shirted singles, and every movie seat filled. The film fare ranges from pure box office, Animal House, to serious inquiry, Our Hitler; from cult films like Pink Flamingoes, to classic works by Fellini, Bergman, Altman, Bunuel, Fassbinder. "The River Oaks usually runs double features and pairs them together in terms of directors, actors, and sequels, like Godfather 1 and 2," says Tom Packlick. He's an avid River Oaks fan and explains why: "I prefer spending my three dollars on double features, and the theatre is within walking distance of my house." A real problem with the programming is that most films run for only one day. It takes real devotion to rush across and see Bogie on Tuesday at 7:35 or Aguirre on Thursday at 9:40. Or is it the other vail poster <about way around? If you lose yb\, with the schedule on it, you're5] lost. The River Oaks doesn't adver?.^ the dailies (except for the listing o> today's show) and their information number is likely to be busy. So tape it securely on your refrigerator. Downtown Houston, like most commuter towns, is deserted at night. On any given summer evening the only people to be found downtown are perched in lonely offices, walled-in at the library, asleep on the sidewalk, or over at the Alley Theatre watching re-runs. "Our attendance was growing until the River Oaks moved in," says Bob Feingold, manager of the Summer Film Program at the Alley. "I hate to lead people," says Feingold. "We schedule films that people might want to see rather than films they should see. There's a camaraderie among audience members who have turned out to see a particular movie," says Feingold. "The Fred Astaire films are like that." The Alley can be counted on for refries. Says Feingold, "One year I ran an experimental short, along with Betty Boop cartoons. It was a lot of hassle, I don't think it added anything." The Alley film repertoire includes many old favorites. The "most well- attended films" according to Feingold have been: Women in Love, Rebecca, A Night at the Opera, The Big Sleep, Casablanca, Shanghai Express, and Flash Gordon's Trip to Mars. There's something in Houston for most everybody's taste buds. All except those craving a few experimental shorts every now or then. So, for those of you with well-worn copies of The Expanded Cinema at your bedside, keep reading. There's no place for seeing. But for the rest of you, see you at the movies. 16 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH