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Houston Breakthrough, October 1980
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Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 12. October 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1573.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1980). Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 12. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1573

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 12, October 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1573.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, October 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 12
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_564j.jpg
Transcript LITTLE THEATERS Here's the theater, here's the jokes, open the doors, where are the folks? -BY MORRIS EDELSON- More productions, more modern productions, and more premieres are in the immediate future for Houston's unconventional theatre groups. Some of them float like butterflies, others sting like bees, but all of them intend to gain a larger audience in the 1980-81 season not only for themselves, but for all lively arts. The problems for theater and especially small-stage production in Houston arise from the make-up of the city—its physical arrangement and its population, both segmented and open to random bombardment from business en terprise and business-related problems. Not only is zoning absent in the town, but so is any predominant orderliness and community of the mind. According to sociologist Ann Gordon Marketti, Houston "is a lot of little galaxies running away from each other. Equinox Theater's executive director Jody Olbrych is optimistic about modern theater in Houston Although it's large, there is little concentration of talent. The most concentrated thing in the city is money, which flows into institutions that support the beauty of money, the Tightness of money, and the interestingness of people who have money." Her hypothesis explains why Houston ranks somewhere below Cincinnati, Ohio in its support of the arts. "The Big Money sees no need for anything aside from professional athletics and corporation/Hollywood culture," according to Leonard T. Wagner, artistic director of Chocolate Bayou Theater. He says the problem in Houston is to create a climate for all the arts—the good thing in this sometimes hopeless endeavor is that arts organizations, especially the small ones, share a conspirators' bond. "We're not in competition with each other," says Wagner. "We want our houses to grow as well as all the other alternate theaters. But there is only small support. Compare Houston's Equinox, Chocolate Bayou, Main Street and Stages theaters and the few others to 150 small theaters in San Francisco, 20-25 in Chicago, 14 or 15 in Minneapolis." Ann Arbor, Michigan, population 100,000, sustains as much theater as Houston, population 2.2 million; more than 30 other cities in the country exceed Houston's play-going public, according to a National Endowment for the Arts survey, and the growth in the Houston audience at the smaller theaters has been very slight in the past five years. Limited Boom However, some of the little theaters are doing quite well by their own measurement. Anthony Mercado, theater dir- 12 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH