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Houston Breakthrough, October 1980
Page 11
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Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 11. October 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1572.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1980). Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1572

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Page 11, October 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1572.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, October 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_564i.jpg
Transcript sensitive to all the victims and all the survivors of the Holocaust." The ADL did not advocate a boycott, said Klein, "but if Vanessa has the right to play the part, then we have the right to object." The Jewish Herald Voice published the letter from the Wiesenthal Center, but made no editorial comment. "We almost didn't run the letter," said Samuels. "In fact, we sat on it for three weeks. We felt people should judge for themselves." Samuels was philosophical about whether Redgrave's sympathetic portrayal outweighed the offensiveness of her ideology. "She has been involved in the Palestinian cause and now in their eyes she is involved with the Jewish cause. You could argue that she's neutralized." The October 2 issue of the Jewish Herald Voice has what must be one of the shortest editorials on record. In its entirety, it reads: "Since we have heard that God does not listen to our prayers, it is mandatory that we try harder to be better." (This refers, of course, to the comments of Bailey Smith, president of the Southern Baptist convention [13.4 million members] who declared that God does not listen to the prayers of Jews.) The editorial is accompanied by a cartoon of a patriarchal, cloud-wreathed God with his fingers in his ears, while below him Moses holds the Ten Commandments and pleads vainly for his attention. The staff of Galveston In Between is taking over the magazine. No, they're not storming the port city's newsroom, they're raising funds to buy out publisher and major stockholder Joe Murphy, recently hired on as publisher of Houston City Magazine. It seems like a happy situation for all concerned."It's kind of fun,"says Murphy. "They're all pooling together, everybody in the place. They're buying a piece of the rock." Murphy says In Between grosses $160,000 a year and has a book value of around $60,000 ("That's what we'd be worth if we closed our doors tomorrow.") Because the buyers are staffers, and not somebody looking for a tax write-off, Murphy says he is "putting together a real small package, less than $50,000." The three major investors, who will own the controlling interest in the magazine, are editor Joel Barna, advertising manager Steve Long and art director Gayle Faget. Barna sees no drastic changes forthcoming for In Between. "We have an a- greed-upon idea of what the magazine should be," he says, "a balance of service articles and the hardest news we can get — that's where we want to keep it." Racism, cultural differences and the language barrier have all hindered the progress of the nation's Spanish-speaking minority," says Rudy Garcia, former executive editor of El Diario-La Prensa, a Spanish-language daily published in New York City (Houston Chronicle, Oct. 2). Another major factor that has severely retarded its political growth, claims Garcia, is "the absence of anything resembling a national Hispanic press." Garcia attributes much of the blame to Latinos themselves, to "fierce nationalist schisms that often lead Hispanics to work at cross-purposes," despite a common language and common roots. Cuban exiles in this country dominate the Spanish-language advertising industry here. Garcia maintains that they impose a form of censorship of Hispanic-oriented media by withholding, or threatening to withhold, advertisements unless news, editorial or program content is changed. So the Hispanic community, particularly a- long the Eastern Seaboard, is "consistently subjected to such ludicrous items as front-page pictures of Fidel Castro captioned 'the beast of the Caribbean.' " Cubans are not the only culprits, says Garcia. Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Mexicans and other Hispanic subgroups have pressured the Spanish-language news media by threats of boycotts or worse. The result, he feels, is that each publication or radio station has a nationalistic identity, and none serves the interests of the total Hispanic community in the United States. "The importance of this should not be overlooked," says Garcia. "The role of a national press in developing an ethnic conscience, forming a consensus of goals and strategies, and bringing potential leaders before the public is crucial to the progress of any American minority group." At least one group in Houston seems to appreciate the importance of the role of a national Hispanic press, and they are doing something about it. Leonel Castillo, former commissioner of the U. S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, and other investors have formed a national news service for Spanish-language newspapers. The Hispanic American Communications Agency (HACA) will link the United States to an already existing international network, the Madrid-based Spanish news service EFE. Castillo, a former City of Houston comptroller, resigned his post at INS last year to run unsuccessfully for mayor of Houston. HACA's goal, says Castillo, "is to link people and events in the United States to people and events throughout the world." The United States is "relatively untapped" in terms of Spanish-language news, says Castillo, even though it has the world's fifth-largest Spanish-speaking population. The association with EFE will provide immediate access to international events and to "the best syndicated Spanish-language columnists in the world." In turn, HACA will be able to feed to and receive from other U.S.cities, providing a national communications network. In Houston, the only newspaper which now receives the EFE news service is the weekly Spanish language La Voz, started six months ago by Armando Ordonez. Ordonez, a Cuban-American, also owns a radio station and is president of HACA. Former San Antonio newscaster Juan Jose Inurria is a HACA investor, Castillo is chairman of the board and EFE owns a third of the agency. Detached Patio Homes. From the $4o's ORIGINALITY. IT'S NOT ALWAYS EXPENSIVE. You want a home of your own. But thought you couldn't afford it. Maybe it's not a question of price, but of convenience. You want to spend your time pursuing your career or relaxing at the swimming pool and tennis courts, not doing maintenance chores. Marix has the answer. It's our Courtyard Home and it can be yours. And what a home you'll have! Completely detached, for privacy and security. Set on a compact homesite, for easy maintenance. With a charming front courtyard and private side and rear yards. And your own garage, for safety and convenience. Protect yourself Your Courtyard Home has all new construction, with a 10-year homeowner's protection plan known as HOW, at no extra cost. There are oversized wood-burning fireplaces. Dramatic vaulted ceilings. Elegant master suites. Beautifully equipped kitchens. Each design is original. A choice of one, two or three bedroom homes. Seven different floor- plans designed just for Marix and you. We call it originality. Because there's no other home like it. Enjoy yourself Life is more enjoyable. With your own community swimming pool and tennis courts. All for a monthly maintenance fee of only $13 to $15 per month. Life is easier. You're close to major highways, shopping facilities, entertainment centers. Your choice of three fine locations — Courtyard Homes in Alief and Spring Branch and Courtyard Glen in the near Northwest. All with excellent school systems. But don't take our word for it. After all, it's going to be your home. Send for the Marix Comparison Test. See if any other form of home ownership in our price range offers as much home for the money as Marix. As much quality for the money. As much originality for the money. All closing costs included with home price (except prepaids). We'll even include full yard fencing, full sodding of all yard areas and landscaping. Washer, dryer and refrigerator included in some plans. tij(&)! Alief Courtyard Homes between Beechnut and Bellaire on Cook. Phone 495-1128. Spring Branch Courtyard Homes on Clay Road just west of Gessner. Phone 460-9612. Courtyard Glen on Fairbanks-North Houston, off Highway 290. Opening in late fall. Marix. The most original courtyard home for the money* Special offering: Send for Marix Single Homebuyers Guide and Marix First-Time Home Buyers Guide. OCTOBER 1980